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Fernando Rivadavia

Drosera flexicaulis in Zambia

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Hi guys,

Here are more pics of yet another amazing Drosera species from Zambia. Andreas F. & I saw this species at a few locations in N Zambia, growing in wet seepages among grasses, sympatric with several other Drosera spp, Genlisea spp., & Utricularia spp. D.flexicaulis was in the past was synonimized to D.affinis -- wrongly in our opinion.

The most amazing feature of this species is that it seems to start out growing a long stem, like an erect tuberous Drosera. But it then forms a rosette similar to a D.intermedia at the top. From this rosette grows another long stem and then another rosette. And so on, see below.

Best Wishes,

Fernando Rivadavia

Several D.flexicaulis among the grasses (can you see stems & rosettes?):

D-10.jpg

A size comparison (look at the stem growing from a rosette):

D-7.jpg

A young plant of D.flexicaulis:

D-5.jpg

A young plant of D.flexicaulis with a small G.margaretae:

D-8.jpg

Rosette & stem of D.flexicaulis (and a flower of the purple form of U.welwitschii):

D-9.jpg

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Once again, thanks for sharing such excellent photos of such a rarity. Have you ever considered going tropical Byblis hunting Down Under?

Cheers,

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Thanks Greg!

Yes I have!! N Australia is on my top 5 list. And now that you mentioned it, you're right! There sure are few pics of northern Byblis on the web, huh?

Best Wishes,

Fernando Rivadavia

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Very nice AGAIN :D

The D. elongata (in the other post) looks great, but I have to say that D. flexicaulis tops it (in my opinion). That is a very attractive species.

Regards,

Christer

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Wonderful photos!

And yes, those are exactly what are in Miyamoto's photos!

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I agree with Christer. The D. elongata are great looking plants but these D. flexicaulis are fantastic! I love the strange growth habit.

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I wonder is it safe in travelling to Zambia as there are alot of fierce animals :?

we are luckily indeed to see such wonderful plants at home. :tu:

Thanks so much to both of you!

rex

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What a fantastic plant! Thanks a lot for these pic's!

You guys really have some nice experiences ;)

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The most amazing feature of this species is that it seems to start out growing a long stem, like an erect tuberous Drosera. But it then forms a rosette similar to a D.intermedia at the top. From this rosette grows another long stem and then another rosette. And so on, see below.

do you think that may be an environmental response? eg slowing down or going dormant when dry then resuming growth from a bud, hence the rosette type growth?

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Yes I have!! N Australia is on my top 5 list. And now that you mentioned it, you're right! There sure are few pics of northern Byblis on the web, huh?

I can't wait! I wouldn't be at all surprised if there were more Byblis species lurking in those tropical regions.

Cheers,

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Hi guys,

do you think that may be an environmental response? eg slowing down or going dormant when dry then resuming growth from a bud, hence the rosette type growth?

Yes we thought of this, but the plants seemed to be growing in permanently wet seepages. We were there at the height of the dry season and it was still pretty wet where D.flexicaulis grew...

I wonder is it safe in travelling to Zambia as there are alot of fierce animals

Actually, it was surprisingly safe in Zambia! As for wild animals, they're all in game parks in Africa now. None of them seem to be truly wild anymore...

That is really a interesting species. What plants are in the background of the 3rd pic? Looks like moss.

I always forget if this is called Lycopodium or Selaginella... I think the former! (Ask me about CPs, I know zip about non-carnivores, hahaha!).

Best Wishes,

Fernando Rivadavia

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Hello!

The plant in the 3rd photo is a lycopod, Lycopodiella caroliniana (the "slender clubmoss" oder "Carolina-Moorbärlapp" wenn du so willst ;)). As many of the extant relict species of Lycopods, it's rather widespread. I found it growing on top of Kukenan and Roraima tepui in Venezuela, on the granitic mountains in Thailand as well as in Sarracenia habitats in the south eastern USA. And here we found it again growing with D. flexicaulis in Zambia.

BTW, the Genlisea in the 4th photo looks more like G. glandulosissima than G. margareata to me. The problem: Both species are often growing together, and hybrids betwenn them are well reported (cf. Barthlott, Fischer, Porembski, 2000).

All the best,

Andreas

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Hey Andreas!

Thanks for the input! I'll leave it up to you to describe to everyone the differences between the 2 Genlisea species! :) They were both very similar to me and I had a hard time naming my Genlisea pics! I remember G.glandulosissima having more flower scapes per rosette, and the scapes being mroe yellowish. But that's about it (I'm away from home and can't even check the important morphological characters...).

Best Wishes,

Fernando Rivadavia

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wow. this flexicaulis growth habits bizarre! i dont think its likely, but is it possible that the grasses there grow on some kind of cycle and that theyre shifting their growth form in parallel to that cycle, maybe growing stem when the surrounding vegetation is growing its fastest??? eh, maybe not...

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better yet, i think its a lot more reasonable to think that this plant forms a long stem, goes dormant and resumes growth like intermedia at first and then forms a stem again. it doesnt seem from the pics that the are any live leaves under the intermedia type rosettes - did you guys see any on any of the plants there?

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Hi Matt,

I don't think there was a complete stop in growth, but a slowing down -- which is when the rosettes are formed. However I couldn't find any live leaves below rosette leaves in my pics.

Take Care,

Fernando Rivadavia

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hi fernando

so then i think my 2nd theory may be correct... that this intermedia like rosette is the first growth stage after dormancy. why do you say you dont think there was a complete stop in growth if you don't see any live leaves below these rosettes? whats the longest distance of active growth you measured? maybe andreas has some input? i see the pic of the plant coming directly from the ground without a "basal rosette", but perhaps this came up from a root rather than a seed? it will be interesting to see if seedlings definitely skip the rosette phase. what were the roots of flex and elongata like?

do any of the australian tuberous Drosera resume growth from the last point or do they all start over from the base?

matt

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To all of you who wants seeds of Zambian CPs:

I DID NOT COLLECT ANY, OK? :):) So no use writing to me, I have nothing for trade!

Best Wishes,

Fernando Rivadavia

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better yet, i think its a lot more reasonable to think that this plant forms a long stem, goes dormant and resumes growth like intermedia at first and then forms a stem again. it doesnt seem from the pics that the are any live leaves under the intermedia type rosettes - did you guys see any on any of the plants there?

is that not what I said? :?

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