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  3. Nepenthesman

    Collecting pollen

    Hello I am not to sure but i don't think you can self pollinate heliamphoras. Please correct me if I am wrong.
  4. andyinsuffolk

    Collecting pollen

    You can get hold of tuning forks pretty easily on Flea-bay. I bought a "set" for £11 only. It contained 5 or 6 different frequencies. I started using the 250Hz fork but this didnt seem to work very well at all so I then switched to the 510Hz fork and the pollen flew out in huge quantities!! I have put the spare pollen in small open tubes, standing in a bed of dessicant beads, and then in a sealed tub, in the fridge. Stored like this the pollen remains viable for up to 12 months. Good luck all. Andy
  5. Last week
  6. Rogier vdg

    20190113_113546

    No, they are in a window sill and a couple of times a week under a day light lamp for a couple of hours. I was afraid it wasn't enough, but right now it is all I can do. The other things are either grass shoots and/or come from the spagnum.
  7. Loakesy

    New Carnivorous Plant Book

    Seems like quite an interesting and unusual angle, compared to your 'run-of-the-mill' carnivorous-plant-cultivation book (not that there's anything wrong with them, of course!!).
  8. meizwang

    BLACK Sarracenia

    thanks for sharing those details, Ada! Deltatango30-that's a beautiful plant, congratulations!
  9. Argo88

    Sundew with no dew

    Hi! My Drosera capensis giant too is growing always outside, minimum -5 C... it is still green and alive, with a very very little dew due to the frost... the most leaves are without dew... my friend that lives in mountain sent me photos of his capensis... they die every winter and grow again in spring... but he told me that a year ago, when he had -11 C and all the water an the peat was an ice cube, they all died definitively;-)
  10. ada

    20190113_113546

    are they under lights? it looks very leggy for a sarracenia seedling. what are the others? weeds?
  11. JoeLo

    Sundew with no dew

    Thank you! In April once the snow is gone I plan to take it back outside. I wasn’t sure if sundews had a dormant period or anything where they stopped producing dew or if they rested in the winter.
  12. RobH

    Sundew with no dew

    I just took a look at my plants which are outside. We can get down to about -5 Celsius, occasionally lower, but snow is rare. Many of the leaves are blackened from the frost which is to be expected. Those that are not blackened are not showing any dew because the plant is essentially resting in the colder weather. Based on previous experience, they will revive quickly in the Spring, so it may simply be your plant is resting for the winter. Looking at your photo, your plant looks healthier than mine because of my blackened leaves! I don't think you have anything to worry about at present. Just keep it ticking over, not too wet but humid, and move it back outside as soon as is practical to take advantage of the lengthening daylight and temperatures. Rob
  13. JoeLo

    Sundew with no dew

    Unfortunately in winter it gets down to 15-20 degrees Fahrenheit so outside is not doable in a snowy climate. Nice in summer but prob couldn’t survive now.
  14. RobH

    Sundew with no dew

    I don't know how cold winter is with you, but D. capensis is frost hardy although it will get knocked back by frost and then regrow in the Spring. Only thing is I would not trust it in really cold weather outside. Rob
  15. JoeLo

    Sundew with no dew

    Do not think it is a light issue. It’s actually right under a grow light in the pic. Usually when capes don’t have sufficient light you get the red/ black effect. Mine is bright green with small growth. Was wondering if the no dew was due to low humidity. My house is extremely dry. I brought the sundew indoors when the cold weather hit. Which is when I noticed the dew disappearing.
  16. RobH

    Sundew with no dew

    It is Drosera capensis and normally easy to grow. I agree with Nepenthesman it looks like it needs more light but otherwise it does not look too bad. Any chance of putting it on a windowsill in good light? Rob
  17. Rogier vdg

    20190113_113546

    S. Psittacina, in the centre a couple of days old still with the husk January 13th
  18. Nepenthesman

    Sundew with no dew

    I think the plant needs a bit more light as it is not as vibrant as it normally is.
  19. JoeLo

    Sundew with no dew

    Yes thanks. Here’s a current picture. Hoping humidity helps it out.
  20. RobH

    Sundew with no dew

    What species of sundew or what does the label say? Any chance of a photo? These would help us give you a good answer as some species take a winter dormancy period. Rob
  21. Nepenthesman

    Sundew with no dew

    High humidity not to much airflow for a while and bright light.
  22. JoeLo

    Sundew with no dew

    Hi, im currently growing a sundew. Had it since June and was flourishing and healthy. Moved indoors in November and dew faded and now completely dry. Hasn’t ate since moved indoors either but still green. I have it next to a humidifier and under a grow light because keep hearing no dew is lack of humidity. Is there a way to get my sundew healthy again? I water it the same, twice a day and have it under the grow light for 8-10 hours a day. Any recommendations for something else? Should I put it in under a cover? Thanks in advance all! Joey
  23. Nepenthesman

    Post your nepenthes.

    Quick update of a few random things.First germination of amp albino peristome on left and my pot of Rafflesiana long neck from albermarlesounds that has not germinated unlike the other pot of it.Left gracilis from Equine Park and right Albomarginata from Penang hill.random nep seedlings of eustachya,many raffs,gracilis,mirabilis and ampsHorrible nepenthes coccinea?Raff Johor has a huge leaf jumpStuff including D.Paradoxa and burmanii I bought from a mall and bunch of mirabilis and gracilis and it’s hybrid as well as 1 amp. Thank you please post Neps and criticise my growing conditions.
  24. Christian

    Western Australia 2018

    Hello, we left the hotel early and had breakfast in a local bakery. There we got the tip to check out a larger granite rock outcrop close to Pingelly. As it is always worth to follow hints of locals we drove there. The way was a good gravel road. Roads like that are very common in that area. When we arrived at the granite outcrop it took only a few minutes until we found the first plants. One of the most prominent plants there were U. multifida. On this location we could find one of the rarer white flowered forms of this species. There have also been some Drosera. No new species, but it was always nice to find something! Besides the carnivorous plants, there have also been other nice things to see. Here is a picture of the habitat. We drove back to the Brookton Highway and then further east to Hyden. In Corrigin we stoped to refill the car and to buy some food and drinks. Whenever possible, we stoped around noon at Roadhouses like this as they most often offer something to eat and drink. A few kilometer before Hyden we stoped and there we could find the first yellow flowered Drosera of our trip. This one is D. subhirtella The location: This night we wanted to stay in Hyden. We had luck and could get a nice Apartment at the Caravan Park. As we arrived a bit early we decided to go first to the Wave Rock, for which Hyden is known. That's one of the best known touristic places in south Western Australia. In contrast to the days before we have not been alone there. The iconic Rock Around this Rock you can find many carnivorous plants. We saw D. bulbosa, macrantha, glanduligera, yilgarnensis and stricticaulis there. The landscape above the "Wave" is also very interesting and worth to see! It was early afternoon as we checked in to our Apartment. At about 16 o'clock we started again to see another location in the south of Hyden. There were still about 2 hours until sunset, so we had not too much time. As we wanted to drive further east the next day we would not have time the next day for this, so we decided to take the chance and see if we can still see something when we arrive. We arrived when the sun was already starting to go down. The location is really nice and you can probably spend a whole day there. We had roughly one hour and so we did not waste much time. The first Drosera we found were some D. rupicola Another new species for this trip was D. graniticola. On the last picture you can as well see D. yilgarnensis. We were very happy to see D. lowriei at this location The day ended with some nice D. macrantha in the back light. Regards, Christian
  25. Nepenthesman

    Western Australia 2018

    Stunning photos.
  26. Nepenthesman

    Best wishes from the tropics!

    Great nepenthes seedlings.
  27. Marcel van den Broek

    New Carnivorous Plant Book

    A CP book by a Cactus grower....
  28. Christian

    Western Australia 2018

    Hello, in the afternoon we wanted to drive to Brookton to stay in the local caravan park for that night. On the way we wanted to see some locations along the Brookton Highway. We made several stops where we found the following plants D. menziesii, rosulata and glanduligera have not been new. We found them on several different places. Auf dieser Strecke hatten wir eigentlich die Hoffnung schöne Drosera gigantea zu finden. 2011 hatten wir dort einige sehr schöne Stellen mit dieser Art gesehen. Dieses Jahr waren sie leider noch nicht so weit: We were hoping to find Drosera gigantea in that area. We have seen some nice plants in 2011. This year, they have not yet been so far. We could only find one plant which was already in flower. Another common plant in that area is Drosera stolonifera. At the end of the day we saw a very nice population of Drosera zonaria. Interestingly, we have been on that place in 2011 already but have not seen them. There have been so many of them, that i hardly can't believe we have not seen them last time. Of course, there have also been some pygmy Drosera. We could find D. hyperostigma and D. nitidula as well as one plant, that i can't identify. On one of the locations we have seen some U. multifida. The plant we most wanted to see was Byblis gigantea. We have known this location from our last trip, so we knew where to look for them. Unfortunately, the plants are just beginning to grow in September. As they have almost the same color as the surrounding vegetation it was not so easy to find them. Our plan was to stay that night in Brookton. I tried to call them from the afternoon on, but had no luck. As we arrived there we had to find out, that they don't have any cabins, just some sites for Caravans. So we had to look for an alternative. Brookton is, as most of the towns in that area, not too large. There was just one other hotel, which was unfortunately already full. The nice people from that hotel helped us a lot and tried to phone the hotel in Pingelly, which is only about 15km (so just around the corner for that part of the world) away. We could get some rooms there. The people from Brookton asked us several time if it is ok for us, as this hotel is quite old. It was already late and we did not want to drive any further, so we booked the rooms there. In Pingelly we fastly checked in. The hotel is really old and the rooms had not much more than a bed and a couch. That was it. It was in fact old and some renovations would really be needed. We did not really feel comfortable. The food was ok and they also had some drinks. We left early the next morning and we probably will try to avoid this place in case we will be in that area again in the future. Regards, Christian
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