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  1. Here are the first photos of my greenhouse this year. I'll add to them as the season progresses. Mainly flavas on this side: Hybrids in the centre: Alata (not in shot), leucophylla, oreophila and sundry other plants on the right: As I've repotted nearly all my plants I have one or two divisions kept under the bench: And finally for now, here's a photo of my Goldie which fortunately has survived brown rhizome rot:
    3 points
  2. Something people from the East coast of North America probably see frequently, but for me it is very exciting to induce Utricularia inflata flowering at home, after a few years growing it (container with clean water obviously just for the photo). It is a very elegant plant, the peduncle ca. 15-20 cm long, and can get much longer. And the flowers are nicely scented.
    3 points
  3. Dirk Ventham’s Giant was not originally grown by Adrian Slack, this is misleading information. I should know as I raised it. Dirk Venthem.
    2 points
  4. From the album: JCZ's photos

    Utricularia subulata. Cleistogamous (left) and chasmogamous (right) flowers.
    1 point
  5. More favourable conditions (strong light, grown alone or at least with enough space, etc.) induce chasmogamous vs. cleistogamous flowers. Interestingly, I get chasmogamous flowers preferably in winter (indoor setup), and cleistogamous ones year round.
    1 point
  6. Very nice. I hope the one I bought from you last year will flower one day, it survived the winter so there is hope. Thanks for sharing.
    1 point
  7. Please see the Lowland form and Highland form of Pinguicula macroceras in the photos I posted. For over 40 years, I've been feeling a bit uncomfortable with these being called the same botanical name such as Pinguicula macroceras, but I don't know the terminology that points out what is taxonomically different. These two Pinguicula macroceras are conveniently called Highland form and Lowland form by hobbyists. The impression I get from the appearance of the Lowland form is similar to that of Pinguicula macroseras ssp. nortensis, but the way the flowers of the Highland form open is similar to t
    1 point
  8. There are no new photos. They are very old photos. Please be patient. After posting the photos, I will post my question. First of all, Pinguicula ramosa,
    1 point
  9. Pinguicula macroceras Highland form
    1 point
  10. Pinguicula macroceras Lowland form
    1 point
  11. hi Alexandre, welcome to the forum/ You have a nice setup there on the balcony.
    1 point
  12. Goodness, that water's amazingly low in hardness. Well, low in everything, actually! It's not tap water is it? If it is you're a lucky person. It'll be fine for Sarracenia. Have fun growing it. Guy
    1 point
  13. Ciao harro sto cercando un cephalotus squat mi hanno detto che tu puoi aiutarmi
    1 point
  14. Hello all, at this link of Italian CP Society website - https://www.aipcnet.it/carnivorous-docs/ - you can find and download, in addition to some interesting Pdf-English version of some articles published on our journal, the following "Special Issues", numbers of our newsletter completely devoted to one subject: - “The Mexican Pinguicula” - by Gabriele Basso - “The Drosera petiolaris complex” - by Maurizio Saroldi - “A tour of the Venezuelan Gran Sabana and some of its Tepuis” -by Andy Smith - “Carnivorous field trip in Abruzzo” – by Gabriele Basso - And the new
    1 point
  15. One of the early wet season Drosera, part of the Petiolaris Complex. Interestingly, in an area about 1 kilometre long by 100 metres wide (between canopied woodland forest and wet season inundated ground) it almost carpeted the ground and was the only Drosera present. Habitat: generally open area with very little or no canopy, soil a sandy loam with lateritic gravel sometimes with scattered larger lateritic rocks.
    1 point
  16. Hi, Continuing with the chronicle of my trip through the southeast of the USA, second location was Baldwin co. in Alabama, to pay a visit to the famous Splinter Hill Bog. It was the beginning of April and the bog although lacking the exuberance of summer or autumn, had the discreet charm of the first spring pitchers of which some of us are devoted, and of course flowers. Recent controlled burn.
    1 point
  17. Some pictures of Drosophyllum 'in-situ' Location: Portugal, Mata da Machada and Santiago do Cacém Date:29/12/2019 and 30/12/2019 New Pictures added from Santiago do Cacém, date: 05/01/2020. Best regards, Cumprimentos / best regards, Nelson José Luís Gaspar Associação Portuguesa de Plantas Carnívoras www.appcarnivoras.org forum.appcarnivoras.org twitter.com/appcarnivoras instagram.com/appcarnivoras facebook.com/appcarnivoras facebook.com/groups/appcarnivoras
    1 point
  18. Got this clone a few years ago from US as very small dying plant but it bounce back from the root. Clone from late Dennis Hastings collection...
    1 point
  19. Hello, thanks for the identification, Sean. I will update my pictures later :) Here is day 9 (of 19). After leaving the Cape Le Grand, our next stopp was planed to be Hopetoun in the eastern part of the Fitzgerald River NP. To go there we decided not take all the highway. Instead we wanted to take a smaller road for the last part of the drive to have the chance to see some carnivorous plants there. There are some lakes close to Esperance, that sometimes turn pink. This happens if the weather is right for a certain algae to grow. As this only happens very rarely, it was almo
    1 point
  20. Here is interesting comparison: left Cephalotus 'Bananito" ( Eden Black x self seed grown) vs its parent Cephalotus 'Eden Black' - right Cephalotus 'Bananito'
    1 point
  21. As a start to growing my own I found this pdf from a search. Thought it might be useful to others (if it has not already been posted). http://rbg-web2.rbge.org.uk/bbs/Resources/Fletcher.pdf
    1 point
  22. A few days ago it came to our attention that a CPUK member had stated they had a Sarracenia cultivar S. ‘Waccamaw’ (which happens to be a crossing between two S. flava var atropurpurea plants) illegally imported into Europe. This member was subsequently banned from CPUK. The reason for the ban was two-fold. Firstly, no Phytosanitary Certificate was obtained. Apart from being a legal requirement, these inspections are needed for international trading to prevent the spread of pests and diseases (such as the Sarracenia rhizome boring pest). Secondly, all Sarracenia species are pr
    1 point
  23. I had the opertunity to take a Malaysian friend "plant hunting" yesterday We explored a few sites within the New Forest snaps 1362 by elvis g, on Flickr snaps 1363 by elvis g, on Flickr snaps 1364 by elvis g, on Flickr snaps 1365 by elvis g, on Flickr snaps 1366 by elvis g, on Flickr snaps 1367 by elvis g, on Flickr snaps 1368 by elvis g, on Flickr snaps 1369 by elvis g, on Flickr snaps 1373 by elvis g, on Flickr snaps 1375 by elvis g, on Flickr snaps 1376 by elvis g, on Flickr
    1 point
  24. From the album: Utricularia

    U. dichotoma Habitat with D. spatulata in the background. (Cranbourne, Victoria)
    1 point
  25. From the album: Utricularia

    U. laterflora (Cranbourne, Victoria)
    1 point
  26. From the album: Utricularia

    U. laterflora (Cranbourne, Victoria)
    1 point
  27. From the album: Utricularia

    U. dichotoma (Langwarrin, Victoria)
    1 point