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  1. Another shots of different Heliamphora exappendiculata clones - M. Schach clone being more compact, and A. Wistuba clone with slender, taller leaves. Heliamphora ceracea x hispida - nice hybrid that naturally occurs on Cerro Neblina Massif. Rather compact and easily clumping. Heliamphora neblinae AW clone Vir2 - very tall and vigorous clone which under proper light forms red stripe through the center of its' leaves as seen on the picture.
    2 points
  2. Hello. Some years ago I had a topic on CPUK with my pictures of Heliamphora. I'd like to resume posting photographs of my plants here but this time with other CP genera as well. First I'll go with 2 very closely related species, coming from the same Tepui - Amuri. My personal take on these is that the H. exappendiculata from Amuri are more or less hybridized with H. uncinata, mostly because they bear nectar glands on the back of their pitchers which is typical feature for H. uncinata but nonexistent when it comes to H. exappendiculata.
    1 point
  3. Just recently described species (March 2024) - Heliamphora electrum, formerly known as H. spec. Venamo and H. collina (Cerro Venamo).
    1 point
  4. I have some VFTs with lots of small offsets forming that I want to bring on. Do they grow to adult size faster if I leave them on the mother plant until they are full size before dividing, or take them off now and pot them up? Or does it make no difference?
    1 point
  5. I normally dont respond to these threads, and prefer people to make their own minds up from first hand experience.... however.... ITS NOT SUPPOSED TO BE BLACK!!!! Black does not exist in the plant kingdom! The name ALLUDES to a darker-than-normal-colour! In my garden for example I grow Agastache 'Black Adder', Aeonium 'Swartkop', Buddleia 'Black Knight', Penstemon 'Blackbird', Heuchera 'Obsidian'… none of these are black, they are a mixture of blues, browns and purples. if you blast any normal Ceph plant with LED or high intensity lights you can get good colour, but this will not last in average greenhouse conditions. I don't use supplementary lighting, and the sun levels in Yorkshire are not that good.. agreed, natural sunlight is the best way, and of course colour (and size) is relative in Cephalotus, you have to grow them in the same conditions to be able to compare them, i.e. you cannot compare wild plants with cultivated, I have also had some clones which never colour up such as the clone grown under the name "Phil Mann" here in the UK. I partly agree, certainly not as much variation as you would get say in Sarracenia, but after about 30 years of growing Cephalotus I do strongly feel that many traits are consistent and repeatably achievable in cultivation. Not all the time, not every year, though, sometimes plants will decide they're going to throw up some odd pitchers for a season, or the colour is going to be a bit different (last year for example my Eden Blacks were all rubbish colour wise), but overall, over a few years the traits are generally consistent. I have trouble getting some Sarracenia to show their cultivar characteristics, particularly Adrian Slack, as in my greenhouse it never gets the really white lid, or the red mouth, however in second-generation plants from Miroslav I do get much better colour. Sarracenia Hummers Hammerhead also does not do brilliantly, it stays quite green with not much venation. I don't think these cultivars are rubbish, I just don't think that they do well under my conditions, I don't get enough sun. Not every plant will perform well for everybody. You cannot compare traits of wild plants to cultivated, unless you remove wild plants and grow them in controlled conditions, to be able to assess whether those traits will persist long-term in cultivation. Personally, I am not interested in wild location Cephalotus, what I want is large, strongly coloured plants which do well in cultivation, in this particular instance I am a horticulturalist and only interested in the growing qualities, selecting for colour, size and vigour, and plants that will do well under UK greenhouse conditions with their cold wet winters. Any plants that do not perform well for me get thrown out, so in effect I'm selecting for plants better adapted to UK horticulture. I've never claimed that Eden Black is the only dark plant around. With the advent of the Internet, people are sharing information about plants a lot more than they used to, remember that Eden Black is about 30 years old now and in those days to see interesting plants it was only first-hand seeing other people's collections or the odd journal! I sat on the cultivar for about 15 years before deciding that the colour was indeed consistent and significant, and worthy of publishing as a cultivar, but only time will tell whether I was right or not. Occasionally other plants in my collection throw up dark pitchers, yes sometimes even darker than Eden Black, but these do not persist. Eden Black is the only plant in my collection which consistently has much darker colour. One thing that does bother me significantly (and I do mean significantly, like a knife in the guts) is that some people do not seem to be able to get a significantly darker growth out of Eden Black, in comparison to other Cephalotus. I don't know the exact answer to this, but my main suspicion is lack of cool nights. We know that the anthocyanins in Cephalotus are produced more during hot days, and broken down during hot nights, but it is the cool nights which makes the pitchers go steadily darker. We don't have much sun up in Yorkshire, but still I manage to get good colour, which I put down to cool nights. I'm all up for open and honest discussions on this topic, but please, please don't make rash comments based on hearsay, or an incomplete understanding of all the facts. First-hand observations and comments are always best.
    1 point
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