Nepenthes air-layering photo guide


gardenofeden
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Hi there,

This all looks very interesting and I am soaking all this information up, but one thing I am not clear on (being a newbie & all). When the roots show and you say 'you can cut it off', do you mean just the little bit that sticks out where you made the cut? I ask because in the instructions in the other link provided, the picture appears as though the whole stem is being sliced below the layer.

Obviously you didn't mean that because you said you layer near the bottom, but I'm just unclear on where you actually chop it off?

TIA

Edited by Rez
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...but one thing I am not clear on (being a newbie & all). When the roots show and you say 'you can cut it off', do you mean just the little bit that sticks out where you made the cut? I ask because in the instructions in the other link provided, the picture appears as though the whole stem is being sliced below the layer.

Obviously you didn't mean that because you said you layer near the bottom, but I'm just unclear on where you actually chop it off?

It means you cut right through the stem below the layer and repot this section. The old stem base will resprout. You then have 2 plants

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I'm used to chop my N.ventrata every year and I put the pieces that I've cut in pots with pure perlite...they always start to produce roots in a few weeks...I don't know if this method works also with more difficult nepenthes species.

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It means you cut right through the stem below the layer and repot this section. The old stem base will resprout. You then have 2 plants

Oh right, so the little picture I saw on the link was right.

Thanks for clearing that up for me, much appreciated. :biggrin:

My next question is, how easy and successful is this? Would it be something that I (captain noob) could do?

Thanks again for your great help. :D

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I'm used to chop my N.ventrata every year and I put the pieces that I've cut in pots with pure perlite...they always start to produce roots in a few weeks...I don't know if this method works also with more difficult nepenthes species.

Do you mean you literally just chop it? Without the air layer method mentioned here? Where do you chop it?

TIA

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Do you mean you literally just chop it? Without the air layer method mentioned here? Where do you chop it?

TIA

Usually I cut more or less a 40 cm long piece of the growing point (between two leaves)...nothing particular...and I place it in a pot filled with pure perlite. Then I keep the potted cutting in a shaded place always keeping the perlite moist.

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Usually I cut more or less a 40 cm long piece of the growing point (between two leaves)...nothing particular...and I place it in a pot filled with pure perlite. Then I keep the potted cutting in a shaded place always keeping the perlite moist.

Thank you for the information. Plenty for me to consider. :tu:

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  • 3 months later...
Guest Pedro Batalha

Great method! But I have one question... Is it possible to proceed this method more than once in the same stem, at the same time??? If so, then it is really superior then cutting, but if not, I suppose cutting is still the best way to reproduce neps (having many plants in mind for trading, for example)...

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Guest MPandini
... Several weeks later, you may see roots growing under the plastic, ...

Hello, from Brazil!

How many weeks to see the roots?

I will try it just here... It's springtime in Brazil!

Thank you for sharing!

Edited by MPandini
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  • 1 month later...
  • 4 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I dont know if it was covered or not, but some things that may help...

Im not sure how big the leaves are, but if you dont remove the leaf, it should root faster.

If there is a substantial 'new' plant above where the roots come its unecessary.

Also, if you were to imagine the circumfrence of the stem to be someones back, it would be

best to scratch the hell of out them with your fingernails.

Thats supposed to be a visual for a good way of air-layering, borrowed from air-layering tree's

basically, you have a few scored area's and a few 'bridges' of the cambian layer to supply the

top part of the plant.

Edited by Gold3nku5h
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  • 2 years later...

I’ve been successful with air layering on other types of plant. A split match or cocktail stick is good for keeping the cut open.

If using hormone rooting powder, only apply it to the cut and make sure it doesn’t get onto the leaf joint where the roots will grow from. It helps plants to root but will kill the roots if they come into contact with it. This rule applies to all other plants so I can’t see that it will not apply to Nepenthes too.

With other types of plant, air-layering is usually done in spring/summer, does this apply to Nepenthes too or are they not fussy?

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 5 months later...

I followed this procedure & air-layered my N. jamban that had started to vine. Not long after starting this procedure, the plant started two new basal shoots - originating from the potted root mass. After 4-5 weeks, I noticed that the main vine (the one I was air-layering) was completely black for the 1st 4-5" (even though it had added at least 3-4 new leaves following the procedure). The plant just up & aborted the primary vine after I started to work on it. I checked & there were no developing roots in the air-layered LFS.

Lets hope the N. hamata, done at the same time, has more success....

=========

13.06.12 edit - the N. hamata developed roots after ~5 months.

Edited by RL7836
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  • 3 weeks later...

This is fantastic! I'm always looking for new methods of propagation. It seems like it would be more successful than cuttings as well. I've never tried this technique on anything other than woody trees, but nepenthes seems well suited for this. Thanks for the step-by-step guide, I'll be putting it into practice for sure.

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