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'Microdentata'


Trev
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That's odd! What about Dentata, Dentate, Heterodoxa & Prostatus, are they not latin as well?

Who has told you this?

I remember reading this somewhere. I think it is briefly discussed at the ICPS Web site about registering cultivars.

http://www.carnivorousplants.org/cultivars/register.html

For an unregistered bogus name, you can call it anything, but there are rules about official registered names. Latin names are OK for Genus and species names, but I do not believe Dentata, Dentate, Heterodoxa & Prostatus are registered cultivar names.

Cultivar names consist of the name of the denomination class (Latin genus name) plus a cultivar epithet (in a modern language) in single quotation marks. The first letter of each word in a cultivar or cultivar-group epithet is capitalized.
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For an unregistered bogus name, you can call it anything, but there are rules about official registered names. Latin names are OK for Genus and species names, but I do not believe Dentata, Dentate, Heterodoxa & Prostatus are registered cultivar names.

Hi Bob,

I thought Dentate was one of the few VFT's people could agree upon as being an official registered cultivar ? :shock:

Edit: Dentate is in the list of registed dioneae cultivars on the ICPS site

http://www.carnivorousplants.org/cultivars/diocult.html

The list doesnt seem to have changed in at least 5 years.

Trev. :P

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Guest Aidan
What about Dentata, Dentate, Heterodoxa & Prostratus...

Dionaea 'Dentate Traps' is the only registered name. This is what it says under 'Dentate':

HC: the established name for the same cultivar is [Dionaea ' Dentate Traps ' {B.Meyers-Rice}]

Latin or pseudo-Latin names are not acceptable. This is taken from the Cultivar Registration form:

Cultivar names consist of the name of the denomination class (Latin genus name) plus a cultivar epithet (in a modern language) in single quotation marks. The first letter of each word in a cultivar or cultivar-group epithet is capitalized.
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2Lap,

Dentate Traps is actually a different form to Dentate, I grow both and Dentate Traps has fairly typical looking teeth in the spring growth and they get more dentate looking as the season goes on but are always a little longer in the tooth than Dentate. As I understand it, from what I have read, one was a TC mutation and the other was wild collected.

Trev. :lol:

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Guest Aidan
HC: the established name for the same cultivar is [Dionaea ' Dentate Traps ' {B.Meyers-Rice}]

Trev - You had better tell the ICPS that they are wrong.

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There are a number of dentate type VFTs that are registered as cultivars, such as 'Jaws' and 'Sawtooth'. The jb is to describe how a new cultivar differs from one already registered. For example, the ICPS database has this about 'Sawtooth'

"This [Dionaea muscipula {Soland. ex Ellis}] is of uncertain origin, but has been distributed without an established name. As such, the commonly used name [Dionaea ' Sawtooth ' {B.Meyers-Rice}] is being registered. [Dionaea ' Sawtooth ' {B.Meyers-Rice}] is a remarkable plant in the Dionaea Dentate Traps Group {B.Meyers-Rice}. Its marginal trap spines are reduced to small triangular teeth, as in [Dionaea ' Dentate Traps ' {B.Meyers-Rice}]. Unlike that latter cultivar, however, the teeth of [Dionaea ' Sawtooth ' {B.Meyers-Rice}] are frequently minutely divided into two or more tiny teethlets, so the trap has an almost fringed appearance. Late in the season, the interior of the traps may be deeply red, although this is not visible in young traps."

and 'Jaws'

"I crossed [Dionaea ' Dentate Traps ' {B.Meyers-Rice}], (...) with its marginal tentacles mutated into short teeth, with a plant we grow which is noteworthy for its consistently extra large, moderately red- colored traps. This plant was selected from the seedlings. The margins of the trap are dentate like the pollen parent. Like the seed parent, the traps are consistently large, with good coloration. The plant is vigorous and even though the traps do not have normal cilia, they do trap insects."
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