New carnivorous plant parent


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Hey everyone! This beginner has a few questions! As of Friday I have a few carnivorous plants.

 

My P. Tina and P. Weser are on a windowsill that's directly on the South. They get direct sunlight from approximately 10 am till 16 PM (give or take one hour) 

 

My N. Bloody Mary is on the northern windowsill. As I read it can burn and dry easily. It doesn't get any direct sunlight but it's on a bright place, it's next to the orchids. Is this bright enough for it or should I move it to the south window? And how often do I need to mist/spray it with water? Once a week? Daily? I'm in Europe by the way, the Netherlands to be exact. 

 

I also caved and ordered a Drosera Aliciae, it will be put on the South windowsill as well as I read it wants lots of light and water.

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Drosera Aliciae sounds good on a south facing windowsill. I only have the one ping but will buy four more this week. I keep the one I have by a shader window and so far so good but would be good to know if south is fine. The rest will join it.

 

The Nep may need more sun but I'll let the experts say so. Mine is also south but the sun is higher so doesn't get the full blast. I've never misted and have not had issues with my Nentrata long tom so far or in the past.

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okay! And how do you give them water? Atm I use the tray method and fill them when they're empty as they apparently like it wet but I read somewhere that you should or water from the top or let the tray dry up and wait 2-3 days between watering? 

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For the Drosera Aliciae, sit in water until the colder months and then keep damp. My Nep and Ping(s) I don't sit in water. My pings are small so I do water gently from above to the side of the post but once the leaves are too big to do so, for now I'll sit in water until the pot feels heavy and then pour the water away for use later in a container. Nep I do water from the top. I can do this twice a week at the moment, again feeling if the pot is lighter.

 

Another option to keep your plants damp which I'm looking into is this - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Moisture-Matting-Green-Metre-Capillary/dp/B08SKJV1RN/ref=pd_bxgy_img_2/260-0729130-3863108?pd_rd_w=qhFHx&pf_rd_p=c7ea61ca-7168-47e3-9c8b-d84748f5b23c&pf_rd_r=GHKF4BHYM18GKJ1APQXZ&pd_rd_r=6b9049d0-66f1-499c-ab81-af77c68d707e&pd_rd_wg=iAd38&pd_rd_i=B08SKJV1RN&psc=1

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Capillary matting is wonderful stuff!

I have five trays in a row.  There is capillary matting running in a continuous piece along all of them.

The three middle trays are lifted up by a couple of centimetres and contain various Pings, pygmy Drosera, a Cephalotus and a Heliamphora.  The outer trays contain other Drosera.  The middle trays contain plants which I don't think want to be soaking in water, the outer trays have plants which are quite happy to be in water 2-3 cm deep.  Don't know if I'm correct in my thinking, just going on experience and some stuff I've read.

The way it works is I fill the outer trays with water and the capillary matting takes the water to the three middle trays.  Because the three middle trays are elevated the two end trays can be filled with water, but the three middle trays never have more than a couple of millimetres of water in.  The plant pots sit on the capillary matting and draw up as much water as they need.

Seems to work really well.  By which I mean, the Cephalotus and Heliamphora are both putting out new pitchers.  I've kept a few of these in the tray system with 2-3cm of water and always managed to kill them.  I'm much more hopeful this year, since starting to use capillary matting.

Plus the Pings are looking really good, too.  So I'm hopeful this new (to me) technique will yield positive results in the long term.

Guy

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On 8/2/2021 at 2:30 PM, FenHarel said:

okay! And how do you give them water? Atm I use the tray method and fill them when they're empty as they apparently like it wet but I read somewhere that you should or water from the top or let the tray dry up and wait 2-3 days between watering? 

I should add that I currently have N Ventrata long tom and a Pinguicula Guatemala

Incoming this week are - 

Pinguicula agnata

  P.cyclosecta      
   P . x Tina      
   P. x Wesser

 

That is how I'm watering those. Other pings or neps may require different ways to water in terms of sitting in water etc.

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2 hours ago, Guy said:

Capillary matting is wonderful stuff!

I have five trays in a row.  There is capillary matting running in a continuous piece along all of them.

The three middle trays are lifted up by a couple of centimetres and contain various Pings, pygmy Drosera, a Cephalotus and a Heliamphora.  The outer trays contain other Drosera.  The middle trays contain plants which I don't think want to be soaking in water, the outer trays have plants which are quite happy to be in water 2-3 cm deep.  Don't know if I'm correct in my thinking, just going on experience and some stuff I've read.

The way it works is I fill the outer trays with water and the capillary matting takes the water to the three middle trays.  Because the three middle trays are elevated the two end trays can be filled with water, but the three middle trays never have more than a couple of millimetres of water in.  The plant pots sit on the capillary matting and draw up as much water as they need.

Seems to work really well.  By which I mean, the Cephalotus and Heliamphora are both putting out new pitchers.  I've kept a few of these in the tray system with 2-3cm of water and always managed to kill them.  I'm much more hopeful this year, since starting to use capillary matting.

Plus the Pings are looking really good, too.  So I'm hopeful this new (to me) technique will yield positive results in the long term.

Guy

Nice set up Guy. If only I had the room but I'm in a flat so I can't venture too far with plants.

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Thanks guys! 

 

I have another question.. my weser has damaged leaves. There's white lines (been there since I got them in the mail) and now a few leaves are broken. Is it due to transport or anything else? And do I let them be or take them off?

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Probably damaged in transport.  If they are completely broken then they will die and rot. I would cut them off.  The plant looks very healthy and will grow new leaves.

Guy

Edited by Guy
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