Silesian Bog Garden


Cephalotus
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Hello everyone,

I wish to share with you some photos of a bog garden I made in my parents-in-law's garden. It is located in south center Poland. Hardiness zone 6B. Last autumn there was -15°C (5°F). Basically all plants lived through that including D. arcturi. That peat bog is in its third year after building. In some places it is too wet and Sarracenia produce phyllodia more than pitchers, so the soil humidity is the key factor for nice pitchers. Of course direct sunlight is also super important. I am experimenting with species, that might be hardy like U. dichotoma and U. monanthos and proved to be hardy. Darlingtonia califormica also lived well, but I think, that too much Seramis in previous mix might have caused its regress, so now it will have regular Sphagnum:perlite mixture. I hope it will improve now. I suspect D. regia could be also hardy, which I will check on the second peat bog made last year.

This peat bog proved me that even in center Poland Sarracenia can look as good as in a glass house. I take basically no care of it. I visit it from time to time. I also don't have to water it, since it has around 600l water reservoir built inside it, so it keeps enough moisture to live through the most hottest days. Only when the Sphagnum dries too much I water it or refill the water reservoir a bit, because I don't want the Sphagnum to look unattractive. I should make a third acidic beat bog for Sphagnum carpet specifically, so it would keep loads of moisture, but there are not that many attractive plants I could plant there... and there is no space for it.

I hope that below photos will inspire some of you to create one in your own garden if you have a possibility to. Hope you enjoy!

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S. 'Carnilandia'

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Sarracenia oreophila x S. alata 'black tube'

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Sarracenia flava var. ornata x S. oreophila "De Kalb" clone B

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Sarracenia flava var. ornata (Giardino Carnivoro)

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In front: Sarracenia leucophylla x S. flava var. rugelii X S. x moorei 'Adrian Slack' clone 1

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Sarracenia leucophylla Very white, thin red veins. Meeting Mira

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S. Leucophylla L30 Red & White

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Sarracenia 'Dino Almacolle' H126

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Sarracenia flava var. rubricorpora F102

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Sarracenia flava red tube x S. alata red H26

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Sarracenia flava var. rubricorpora F161

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L: Sarracenia flava var. ornata F47, R: Sarracenia flava var. rubricorpora F161 (Mike King)

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S. 'Tygo'

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Sarracenia x excellens Eddie Bates H152

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Od lewej: S. flava var. flava, Anthocyanin free. Shallotte, S. 'Goldie', S. 'Leah Wiklerson' z prawej: S. 'Leah Wilkerson' x S. 'Adrian Slack'

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Sarracenia flava var. atropurpurea clone F130G

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S. oreophila O22

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From left: S. flava var. flava, Anthocyanin free. Shallotte, S. 'Goldie', S. 'Leah Wiklerson', on the right: S. 'Leah Wilkerson' x S. 'Adrian Slack'

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Front plain: S. 'Judith Soper', back plain: S. leucophylla L31A x ‘A Porais’

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S. alata var. ornata Heavy vein A16

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Calopogon tuberosus

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D. fuschii var. alba

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D. fuschii var. alba

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Eleorchis japonica

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Eleorchis japonica var. alba

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Pogonia ophioglossoides

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Carex pulicaris

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Drosera binata - does very well grows to its full potential and flowers very well too. There are many on the peat bog, but it is hard to take a good picture of them.

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D. intermedia

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D. intermedia x filiformis

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Dionaea muscipula region with D. filiformis

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D. muscipula 'Red Dragon'

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D. muscipula 'Kronos'

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D. muscipula 'Kayan'

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D. muscipula 'Warewolf'

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Possibly D. muscipula 'Pink Venus' but it might also be 'Red Dragon'

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Anoplius cf. viaticus  - poor spider. :/ I saw the whole thing how the wasp stung chased, stunged, dragged and burried the spider on the peat bog. :/

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Thymelicus spp. on S. oreophila

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Edited by Cephalotus
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3 hours ago, Paul O'Keeffe said:

Think you maybe short of one more plant:D

Which one do you have in mind?

I am happy you like it, I leaned a lot with it too.

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Thank you for showing these pictures. You have made a great setup. I grow many sarracenia and and sundews outside here in Central Denmark but many won't be a tall as yours because of our cooler summers. Anyways do you have a picture of your arcturi and what clone of binata have you used that are hardy?

 

Martin

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Posted (edited)

Hi Martin,

I think, that the way Sarracenia are growing is related to the soil humidity and cleaning treatments. If the soil humidity is too high the plants will go into phyllodia instead of pitchers. That problem doesn't reffer to S. oreophila and its hybrids, but this species is also very prone to rottong during the winter, so from the beginning it landed in the highest point with lowers humidity.

This year I am moving some of the Sarracenia up to lower humidity, because they are all made of phyllodia. Also I learned, that if you clean the plants out of the old leaves too much, that would also effect them in a bad way. In first spring I cleaned them to the ground and that didn't end well. This year I left like 1/2-2/3 of the old leaves so the plants gad better start and that worked like a charm.

Here is D. arcturi. This summer I planted rest of mine out.

Turion:

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About a month ago:

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Drosera binata I planted a few forms and I already don't know which ones are where exactly. I planted regular one, which is not self pollinating, typ small (which produces selfpollinated seeds) and var. dichotoma (not self pollinating). All of them live. They loose the above the ground parts, but grow back every year. The Fastest growing is thr one covered with sphagnum. Their first flowers just oppened, but I haven't taken their pictures yet.

Here is one photo from last year (from this year is above).

 

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Edited by Cephalotus
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Sounds like I should experiment with some of my many binata forms.

About sarracenia I've had many outside for over ten years. Soil humidity is certainly a real important factor in the growing of these. Purpurea and some of its hybrids can easily take water up to and even slightly above the rhizome where many others needs it more dry. This goes for flava and oreophila. Oreophila should in my experience have at least ten cm from the rhizome down to the water level.

Minor, leucophylla and alata are not hardy outside here as our growth season is too short for them to develop and store enough energy for the winter. This also goes for some but not all of the hybrids made with these species.

I can follow your experience with cleaning up the leaves.

Did you made any experience with southern hemisphere utricularia?

Martin

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I measured the maximum water level in different places. In the lowest part, where I have tall Sarracenia like S. leucophylla and some hybrids, the highest water water level is 11 cm below the soil surface. The soil was soaked wet after rain refill and the plants produced short root system. Plants had large phyllodia. They were planted same long ago as other plants. Those plants I replanted higher. Because I moved some plants to new bog garden, I also had a chance to compare roots of a plant from higher region where the water level was 21 cm below the surface. The root system was almost twice as long and there were much more side roots. I should have thought of taking a comparison photo. :/ According to my knowledge the better developed root system, the better pitchers.

I already tried U. monanthos and U. dichotoma. Both lived through the winter without a problem. I don't know which other I could try. The first one is flowering (and it is setting seeds without a problem), the second one will flower this year! I can't wait to see that. I already know, that both Utricularia like to grow in wet conditions. The water level should be near the soil surface, but they don't need to be submerged. They grow fine up to water level 10 cm below the surface. The wetter, the better they grow, and in drier conditions they will thrive, but won't flower. They need loads of sun, so open space not covered with higher plants. In partial shade they won't flower, just grow super slowly.

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