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I am running short of water because it hasn't rained for ages. I have a couple of de-humidifiers that produce suitable water for carnivorous plants but they need to be working for several hours a day to produce sufficient water. I don't really want to keep them running.

I have seen several advertisments for domestic water filters - these claim to remove total dissolved solids and other impurities. Is water from these suitable? I live in a hard-water area.

Terry.

 

 

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Not sure what you mean by a "domestic water filter".  A further explanation would be useful to know what sort it is.

Quite a few people, including me, use a Reverse Osmosis unit as a "spare" in case of rain water shortage.  You can also use them for producing "pure" drinking water.  The water that comes out of my RO unit is <20 ppm as measured by my TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) Meter - you can buy them on Amazon - and I live in a hard water area.

It is generally regarded as important to use water with <50 ppm TDS for carnivorous plants, so if your "domestic water filter" does that, then it should be OK.

Kind regards,  Rob

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Or contact your local aquatic shop and ask how much they charge for RO water.  Mine charges 70p for 5 litres. Less for larger quantities.

Guy

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I use the water from our two dehumidifiers which are on 24 hours a day (obviously they only run when the humidity gets above a set limit as we live in a bungalow.) I use it occasionally when we haven't had rain for a while and my stock of rain water is running out. I check the toss every time I do this and it has always been 20ppm

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13 hours ago, pirks said:

I use the water from our two dehumidifiers which are on 24 hours a day (obviously they only run when the humidity gets above a set limit as we live in a bungalow.) I use it occasionally when we haven't had rain for a while and my stock of rain water is running out. I check the toss every time I do this and it has always been 20ppm

 

Then is should be fine to use that.  Better get storing it for a "non-rainy" period!

Kind regards,  Rob

Edited by RobH
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Thanks for your comments. The 'domestic water filter' I have in mind is one of those plastic jugs with a filter that you can get for £20-£30. Some have a TDS meter and say to change the filter when the reading gets above 006ppm.

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