Which of these need to go dormant, and how do I do it??


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Hi, it's my first winter of many CPs approaching (I only had 1 VFT last year and I made it stay awake!), so I was wondering which of the following need to be sent to sleep, and how do I go about doing it....

Several flavours of VFT

D. Capansis and Aliciae and Spatulata

S. purpurea ssp purpurea

S. rubra ssp gulfensis

Ping. "Weser" (garden centre) (and a load of little teency plantlets about 2-3mm diameter!)

S psitticinia

Cephalotus.

Seeds for the Capensis and Aliciae and Ping.

Thanks for any advice you can give me!

Ken

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All of the Sarracenia require a dormant period and an unheated greenhouse, cold-frame or conservatory provides ideal conditions. The plants should be kept just damp during dormancy.

There is ongoing debate as to whether Cephalotus actually requires a dormant period. Some growers feel the plant benefits from a cool period and others not. Your choice, but I wouldn't let the plant experience temperatures below freezing for any significant length of time.

The Mexican Pinguicula should start to form a compact rosette of winter leaves and this is the sign to reduce watering and lower temperatures. Too much water when the plant is resting almost guarantees rot setting in.

All the sundews listed may be kept in growth.

Thread moved to CP Dormancy forum.

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It depends what species of sundewss you are talking about. I have had success with keeping D. binata and all varieties except 'extrema', capensis, aliciae, capillaris and filliformis. All these except capillaris died down to either roots or in the case of filliformis, a hibernacula.

other more tropical species wouldn't survive our temperatures in winter.

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Hi all can you please tell me witch of theirs need to go dormant

Darlingtonia californica: cobra lily

Sundew Drosera: intermedia - Maidendown Common

Sundew Drosera: Aliciae

Sundew Drosera: slackii

Sundew Drosera: CAPENSIS ALBA

Sundew Drosera: Capensis typical

Sundew Drosera: rotundiflolia - round leafed sundew

Sundew Drosera: binata - Fork Leaved Sundew

Sundew Drosera: scorpiodes

Sundew Drosera: filiformis

Pinguicula (butterworts)

Pinguicula: grandiflora

Pinguicula: wesser

It my first winter as a CP keeper!

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Some of the plants you've listed will definitely want to go dormant, some will tolerate cold conditions and other will need some sort of extra heat for the winter.

Pinguicula 'Wesser' is a hybrid of Mexican species and needs to be kept at a 5C minumum, but it will do okay at warmer temperatures (say indoors). Like most Mexican Pinguicula, this plant has a winter dormancy, when it produces smaller, non-carnivorous leaves. You should keep the plant bone dry until you see either new leaves or small adventitious roots in the spring.

Drosera scorpiodes is a winter grower from Australia and needs to be kept cool but frost free.

Drosera capensis, slackii, aliciae and binata will probably take freezing conditions; certainly my plants do. After the first frost the leaves will most likely die off but these species all produce thick fleshy roots from which new growth will emerge in the spring. You should only consider allowing these plants to freeze however, if they are well established. I prefer to experment with spares first. :)

The other drosera will all go dormant and will form a small resting bud called a hibernacula (plural hibernaculum). They will all take frozen condtions over a long period. The same applies to Pinguicula grandiflora. Keep these species wet while they are dormant. If you have Drosera filiformis var. tracyi (as opposed to var. filiformis) keep a watch on it over the winter as it is prone to fungal infections. I like to give the hibernacula a dusting with powdered sulphur, which helps to keep fungus spores at bay.

Hope this helps,

Phil

Hi all can you please tell me witch of theirs need to go dormant

Darlingtonia californica: cobra lily

Sundew Drosera: intermedia - Maidendown Common

Sundew Drosera: Aliciae

Sundew Drosera: slackii

Sundew Drosera: CAPENSIS ALBA

Sundew Drosera: Capensis typical

Sundew Drosera: rotundiflolia - round leafed sundew

Sundew Drosera: binata - Fork Leaved Sundew

Sundew Drosera: scorpiodes

Sundew Drosera: filiformis

Pinguicula (butterworts)

Pinguicula: grandiflora

Pinguicula: wesser

It my first winter as a CP keeper!

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so is it ok just to leave them in the unheated greenhouse ?

All the plants that need a cold dormancy can be left in an unheated greenhouse. The plants that I have noted can take frost but with a certain risk are probably better brought into the house, as are those that are definitely tender.

You could of course heat the greenhouse to a 5C minumum which will allow you to grow a far wider range of plants - just about everything except the tropicals.

Phil

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Personally I grow my D. capensis and cephalotus indoors on a windowsill during winter. The capensis slows down and loses most of its dew and the cephalotus grows non trapping leaves throughout the winter. They both go back in the greenhouse in spring.

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Guest Sheila
so is it ok just to leave them in the unheated greenhouse ?

I should have mentioned that although I keep all the plants you have lised in the greenhouse for the winter,( except the P. weser) I keep them frost free at a minimum of 2C. They all survive well and the slackii and aliciaes don't die back, they just stop growing. If you want to make sure they make it through you may be best to invest in a frost free parrafin heater. I used parrafin for several years before investing in an electric heater, it doesn't harm the plants.

I don't keep my wesers bone dry indoors, but keep them damp. It has never done them any harm so long as they are not soggy. They will produce narrower winter leaves and you will find that your one plant will divide into several by spring.

The other drosera will all go dormant and will form a small resting bud called a hibernacula (plural hibernaculum).

I think you have that the wrong way round Phil, single is hibernaculum and plural hibernacula :D

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I used parrafin for several years before investing in an electric heater, it doesn't harm the plants.

Yes. parrafin heaters are cheap to run, cheap to buy and are easy to set up. I used to use one as well when I started growing these plants. The main disadvantage is they do not have any sort of thermost control so you have to watch them during periods when the weather is liable to change. You also have to keep a watch on the fuel levels with a few containers of parrafin in reserve to top up the tank every few days. I seem to remember as well, that parrafin was getting harder to find at filling stations.

I don't keep my wesers bone dry indoors, but keep them damp. It has never done them any harm so long as they are not soggy. They will produce narrower winter leaves and you will find that your one plant will divide into several by spring.

Yes, I guess P. 'Wesser' is one of the tougher Pinguicula hybrids. You could probably grow it in pure John Innes and still get good plants!!

I think you have that the wrong way round Phil, single is hibernaculum and plural hibernacula :wink:

Opps! You are right. :oops: I guess it shows I didn't go to the right sort of school - we didn't have to learn Latin.... :D

Phil

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I seem to remember as well, that parrafin was getting harder to find at filling stations.

If you have a good small hardware store near you, they often sell parrafin. That's where I buy mine when I need it.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi all!

I've been quiet for a while (though not domant! :D )

It's my first winter with CPs, and (other than my Nepenthes, which I know are tropical), they're all the kind that have been mentioned in this thread as needing dormancy - some VFTs, drosera and Sarracenia.

At the moment they're on a bright sunny windowsill in an unheated room. Some of them (especially the VFTs) seem to be dying back (I'm cutting off the dead/blackened leaves), but I wondered if I should put them outside, and if so where?

Potential problem - although it's not too cold yet, I'm in Scotland and they'll need to be able to survive quite a bit of frost and freezing! And I haven't got any kind of coldframe/ greenhouse etc.

Help please! :D

Thanks!

Carina

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If your room is unheated you should have no problems with dormancy. The fact that your VFT is showing distinct signs of dying back implies that everything is fine.

Just remember to reduce the watering. Over winter, don't stand the pots in water. If the room is unheated you probably won't need to water at all, but check the pots every few weeks and if the soil looks dry, give them enough water to wet the soil but remove any that drains into the tray or saucer you have the pots in.

Phil

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Thanks - that's what I wanted to hear! And I didn't know about the watering, so I'll definitely cut back on that now :)

Still one concern, though... Although the VFTs are definitely dying back (black traps etc), the drosera and Sarracenia are still going strong!

I think the room might still be a bit warm - I put a thermometer in there yesterday, and it's about 15-17 C, which is warmer than I'd expected!

Is this keeping the Drosera and Sarracenia 'awake' when they shouldn't be, and if so, what should I do?

Thanks again

Carina

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It depends which plants you are talking about.

Some Drosera may not go truly dormant at that temperature but growth will slow.

I still have S. alata, S. leucophylla and S. rubra in growth in unheated conditions.

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Hi, and thanks!

The CP's I've got, other than the VFTs, are:

D adelae

D capensis 'red'

D capensis 'giant'

D intermedia x brevifolia

D binata

S. Leucophylla x rubra

S. minor

One that I think is S purpurea ssp venosa

and a big hybrid I got from Hampshire Carnivorous plants - S sv Juthatip Soper

Actually, the only ones that are showing any signs of dying back are the D adelae (which I thought was tropical), and the S minor (well, two of the traps are really big and strong, but the rest have dried up and died, which might just be because they came to the end of their lifespan).

So, what should I be doing? :)

Thanks again

Carina

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  • 16 years later...

Goodness, 16 1/2 years later!  Hopefully kenmc has sorted winter dormancy out by now.

And, by the way, I don't think he was saying all the plants in his list at the top of the thread were VFTs.

Guy

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