Drosera filiformis Virginia


Nord Ravn
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi Martin,

those D.filformis in VA are not native but naturalised. I'm not sure where they originally came from. There are also naturalised populations in WV, OH, PA, MD, CA and other states. Most of them originate from the NJ pine barrens, but who knows for sure. Some were planted illegally so there are no records, some were planted on private property. So you would have to ask the owners.

Eric

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

It is introduced according to this: http://www.efloras.org/browse.aspx?flora_id=1

"Drosera filiformis is disjunct in the outer Coastal Plain, from Nova Scotia and Connecticut to Maryland, southeastern North Carolina, and Bay and Washington counties, Florida. The species has been reported from South Carolina, but no specimens from there have been seen. It is introduced in Caroline County, Virginia, and Preston County, West Virginia, and possibly other localities peripheral to its range."

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Christian,

I could be wrong and there is always that "bird migration argument" that is used to connect the disjunct populations and could also be used to explain temporary populations in between. But presently I'm pretty sure that there are no native populations of D.filformis in VA. Do you have any good reason to believe there are any? There are no historical records for D.filiformis in VA, but many cases of deliberate introductions of non-native CPs in that state.  It is known that D.filiformis was naturalised in Prince George’s Co., MD already before 1947. Another population was found much later in Charles Co., MD, and it is assumed that it may also be introduced or spread from the former site. This is close to the VA border. There are reports Rafinesque found D.filiformis in Sussex Co., Delaware in 1804 (type + Glocester Co., NJ), but presently no known native populations. No other native populations are nearbye. Of course there are many native sites in NJ and a few in Southeastern NC.

Eric

 

Edited by Podunk
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Hi,

interesting, i did not know that and was under the impression, that there are natural populations of D. filiformis in Virginia. Especially as i have plants with "Virginia" as location in my collection since many years.

Christian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Christian,

I don't doubt your label, but it does not say whether those filiformis are native or naturalised. There are herbarium sheets dated 1928 stating D.filiformis was introduced to Prince George’s Co., MD. So some introductions are old, some were gone some time later again, others may still exist. I know Phil S. introduced D.filiformis to Caroline Co., VA around 1982. Did you get your plants earlier than that?

Eric

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Eric,

thanks! I got my plants sometime around 2000 i think. I did definitely not know what a carnivorous plant is in 1982 :) And of course, the label doesn't say that natural populations exist and i do not have any reason to assume, there are natural populations in VA. I just never got aware of the disjunct distribution and was surprised to hear about that. Is there any explanation as to why there are no plants in VA? This somehow doesn't really make sense. I have seen D. filiformis in NC, but have never been more north than VA. Are the northern forms different from those in the south?

Christian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share