Sign in to follow this  
Hayley5

how to propagate sarracenias

Recommended Posts

Hello everyone

A few months ago I bought two sarracenias that you can see on the photos I attached. However, I would like to propagate them.

Can you tell me how to do it? I am not so good in this subject and I don't want to damage them.

Waiting for your ideas.

37588616_1734177089964082_6424074561351843840_n.jpg

37624216_1734177229964068_1387123210809507840_n.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's usually just done by division Hayley.  If you can see separate growth points then you could tip out of the medium, clean up the rhizome and see if one or more of the growth points can be broken of, ideally keeping a decent bit of rhizome with roots, then just pot it on.  Unrooted rhizomes will usually take too but is more of a risk.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Firstly, don't do any dividing at this time of year when in full growth... they'll suffer unnecessary stress and set back quite a bit!

As Chris said, division is the easiest, fastest and best way of obtaining new plants quickly. Look at the rhizome for natural growth points and if you have two or more, you can split it. You really want to make sure each division has some roots on it.

Some cut the rhizome with a sharp knife but I prefer to snap them with my hands, as it allows you to feel how readily the plant is willing to be divided. 

Then it's simply a case of potting each piece in fresh media (equal parts peat & perlite) with the top half of the rhizome just proud of the surface and water in well.

Best advice I can give is check out some youtube tutorials

..and/or pick up some good books on the subject, such as Savage Garden by Peter D'Amato or Carnivorous plants by Nigel Hewitt-Cooper

Edited by Stu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have venus fly traps then you'll know what to look for when the rhizome splits. Its best done over winter if it needs it, during its resting season. Don't get too eager and damage your plants, they'll look after themselves for the most part. If anything, keep an eye out for more plants rather than touching these, perhaps some drosera, then you'll have a little range of different things happening at once and can do drosera leaf or flower stalk cuttings in the meanwhile.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks tissue cultured. It'll be a bit difficult to divide yet because it'll be a mass of pitchers on a small piece of rhizome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this