Psittacina advice, please


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A little while ago I bought this S.psittacina from Hampshire Carnivorous Plants.

As you can see, it's got lots of dead leaves.  Should I leave them there or trim them all off?

Thanks.

Guy

P1010095

 

Edited by Guy
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Dead leaves can be completely removed although it can be fiddly to do.  This species (along with purpurea and hybrids of the two) retain their leaves longer than other Sarracnia and therefore shouldn't have an annual 'haircut'.  Just remove as they die off like you do with Darlingtonia.  This species also likes to be very wet.  Mike King and myself grow them in trays of water and live sphagnum just floating bare root in there.  They seem to like it, although the Sphagnum quite often needs trimming back to stop it smothering the pstitts.  

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27 minutes ago, Guy said:

Thanks Richard

The idea of growing it in a tray of water and sphagnum is intriguing.  What depth trays do you use?

Guy

Cat litter trays. I keep it full of water in the growing season and let it go down naturally to about halfway during the winter.  One of them I also keep some aquatic Utricularia in there also, U. gibba I think off the top of my head.  

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I think the trays are around 8-10cm deep.  I don't think it matters if it's deeper. I recall Adrian Slack saying to submerge the plants in a bucket in the winter.  

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Thanks again, Richard

There just happens to be a cat litter tray in the shed--weird coincidence!

Once it's filled with water and moss should I just take the psittacina out of its pot and put it in the tray?  Or should all the compost be washed off it first?  I also have a much smaller psittacina which can go into the tray as well.

Guy

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1 hour ago, Guy said:

Thanks again, Richard

There just happens to be a cat litter tray in the shed--weird coincidence!

Once it's filled with water and moss should I just take the psittacina out of its pot and put it in the tray?  Or should all the compost be washed off it first?  I also have a much smaller psittacina which can go into the tray as well.

Guy

Bare root among the moss.

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A floating S.psittacina!

Thanks for the advice. This isn't the plant in the earlier photo, but one I bought yesterday from a local garden centre.  No idea of its provenance, but it looked healthy and worth trying in this new (to me) set up.

It's planted at one end of the tray so another couple of these can be fitted in.

Guy

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Oh, right.  Didn't realise that.  A larger tray will be procured tomorrow.

Any thoughts on what could be planted in this smaller tray full of sphagnum?  Now I've got it I might as well use it--cost me £5!!!

Thanks again.

Guy

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Well, you could use the Sphagnum in the other tray. You don't need very much of it. It should be more water than anything else.  BTW, I may use live sphagnum but I as of about 5 minutes ago do feel the plants tend to get rather suffocated from it.  

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44 minutes ago, Richard Bunn said:

Well, you could use the Sphagnum in the other tray. You don't need very much of it. It should be more water than anything else.  BTW, I may use live sphagnum but I as of about 5 minutes ago do feel the plants tend to get rather suffocated from it.  

Oh, what happened 5 minutes ago to make you change your mind?

Guy

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Thanks for starting this thread Guy. The info from Richard is excellent and just what I needed to improve the lot of my psittacina, although they appear to be happy a la' Sarracenia treatment.

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One thing I would say is to be careful in the way you label them. Maybe a bit of fishing line or something literally tieing the label across the plant and hiding it underneath. I didn't do that. I just placed the label under each plant. Trouble is things grow! Including the Sphagnum. So I have a funny feeling that I'm not going to be able to properly pass on my divisions, when that time comes, as a particular clone as it'll be extremely hard for me to discern which is which.  Lesson learned.  

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2 hours ago, Richard Bunn said:

One thing I would say is to be careful in the way you label them. Maybe a bit of fishing line or something literally tieing the label across the plant and hiding it underneath. I didn't do that. I just placed the label under each plant. Trouble is things grow! Including the Sphagnum. So I have a funny feeling that I'm not going to be able to properly pass on my divisions, when that time comes, as a particular clone as it'll be extremely hard for me to discern which is which.  Lesson learned.  

Yes, this has always been a concern for me... I currently keep my psits in individual deep trays of water but thought about chucking them all into a very large water trough, but never decided on a way to easily keep them uniquely identifable.

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2 hours ago, Richard Bunn said:

One thing I've just noticed in your second photo @Guy , is that a D. madagascariensis you have there to the left of the tray?

Amazingly well spotted!

Yes, it's a D. madagascariensis.  And it's looking very sickly.  It was in a tray with various other Drosera which went all floppy and smothered it.  So I've moved it out to give it some breathing space.  It's in the compost it arrived in when I bought it from Hampshire CPs.

Not sure it's going to survive, so any tips you have would be much appreciated.

Guy

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2 hours ago, Richard Bunn said:

One thing I've just noticed in your second photo @Guy , is that a D. madagascariensis you have there to the left of the tray?

Amazingly well spotted!

Yes, it's a D. madagascariensis.  And it's looking very sickly.  It was in a tray with various other Drosera which went all floppy and smothered it.  So I've moved it out to give it some breathing space.  It's in the compost it arrived in when I bought it from Hampshire CPs.

Not sure it's going to survive, so any tips you have would be much appreciated.

Guy

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Just make sure it's getting good light.  It's a slightly scrambling species anyway.  Mine always seem to die down to the roots in the winter and occasionally I lose one. This is because it's a tropical species. This year it's being moved indoors where it should continue to grow a bit (hopefully).

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