tropicbreeze

Carnivores in the backyard

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The wet season brings out lots of carnivores on my place, it's a natural habitat for many of them. Getting photos of CPs can be a daunting task, often on  knees and elbows in water and/or mud. Where there's no surface water I'm often on my belly on wet ground. Anyway, that's my excuse for some of the photos being poor quality. This is what I've managed to find here this past wet season.

Byblis aquatica, which is fairly common.

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The first CPs to come up early in the wet season are Drosera fulva. Wasn't able to take photos earlier on so none of plants flowering.

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D. fulva winding down for the season.
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Still find it a bit difficult pinpointing the difference between Drosera dilitatopetiolaris and D. petiolaris. But fairly sure mine are dilitatopetiolaris.

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Drosera burmannii is probably the least wide spread Drosera on my place. Being so small they tend to get sand particles splashed onto them.

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Of the Indica Complex Drosera D. nana is the most common and earliest grower. The first one has what looks like a Setocoris insect on it. They manage to rob food from the plants without getting caught themselves.

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Drosera aquatica, also very widspread on my place, even coming up in lawns in some parts.

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Drosera fragrans, the last species of Drosera to get going in the wet season. Widespread, but not as common as the other two.

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There's more Utric species here than other CPs. Most widespread (also one of the most inconspicuous) is Utricularia nivea. they seem to come up everywhere except in standing water.

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Far less common and about the same size are Utricularia minutissima.

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Utricularia leptoplectra is very common but only in wet swampy areas.

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Utricularia leptorhyncha occupies less wet areas than leptoplectra but seems to need sub-surface seepage.

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There's one large patch of Utricularia odorata, a smaller patch seems to have disappeared.

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Utricularia chrysantha also seems to prefer wet soil but no surface water. It's a later starter and keeps going after most other Utrics have disappeared.

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First time I found Utricularia foveolata on my place was this last wet season. initially didn't know which species it was, but when finally getting around to identifying it I realised it was rare. Going back to try and get more photos I wasn't able to locate any more plants. So unfortunately there's only this one fairly poor photo.

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Thanks for the great pictures.! Always wanted to go to Australia to see them. Did you have to go far to find them? 

Edited by mark funnell

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Thanks for posting mate, great pics. Stunning Colour and shape with U. leptoplectra. Good bit of growing info as well...Keep 'em comming :D

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Thank you for your contribution!

Australia´s carnivorous plants are really unique and fascinating.

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Thanks for the comments fellas, much appreciated.

Mark, quite literally as it says in the title, all these photos were taken on my property. Admittedly, my property isn't your average suburban block. So far I've found 14 species of CP that grow naturally on my place. An additional one, U. gibba, I don't count as I suspect it came in on some water plants I bought.

I also have more photos taken in other localities around the place. When they're sorted I'll put them up on separate threads. This area is rich in CP species, but only Utricularia, Drosera, Byblis and Aldrovanda (also Stylidium, as a pseudo-carnivore).

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Really amazing to have such a great selection of plants in such a close proximity to your house. Would love that myself. 

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Would love to see some Stylidium photos too!

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Mark, it's a definite advantage for me. "Mother Nature" does all the work looking after the plants. No effort (and especially no frustrations) on my part trying to grow them, but still the enjoyment of them being "mine".

Werds, there's only 2 Stylidiums I've IDed on my place but have photos of others in the area as well. May be worth another thread just for them.

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This is great Tropicbreeze! Thank you for posting all this, and those bits of information about native habitat conditions are like gold dust!

Off topic for this sub-forum, but still on weird plants, have you ever tried growing Platycerium quadridichotomum? It grows in nature with a completely dry season and preserves its tissues like Xerophyta and some Selaginella, them "resurrects" itself when rain returns. It looks completely dead in the dry season.

Edited by Karsty

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Great to have so many in your backyard! Guess it's not a suburban size?  I'll be in Darwin in a months time - any recommendations of where to go to see a few plants?

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Thanks for that Karsty, I've replied on your Platycerium thread.

Dunc, very definitely not your average suburban size backyard. I'd say if you're coming to Darwin and particularly wanted to see CPs then you should have made it during March/April. But May or June can be good (depending on where exactly you're prepared to go) if the wet season drags out. This year we got exceptionally high rainfall in January (at my place 1068mm for the month), but after that the rain died. Everything is drying out fast. Closer to Darwin the Howard Sand Plains would be your best bet. There are other areas but it depends on what your travel agenda is. This is the link to a thread I put up for a guide to the plants of the Howard Sand Plains, you should find it interesting.

http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?/topic/60112-field-guide-to-plants-of-darwin-sandsheet-heath/

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Looking around the past day there's lots of Drosera burmanni flowering. Seeing as I didn't post any flower photos of them before I'll add this one here.

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Other CPs I saw still flowering despite the dry weather were Drosera aquatica, D. fragrans, Utricularia chrysantha, plus only one U. nivea.

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On ‎5‎/‎27‎/‎2018 at 8:52 AM, tropicbreeze said:

Thanks for that Karsty, I've replied on your Platycerium thread.

Dunc, very definitely not your average suburban size backyard. I'd say if you're coming to Darwin and particularly wanted to see CPs then you should have made it during March/April. But May or June can be good (depending on where exactly you're prepared to go) if the wet season drags out. This year we got exceptionally high rainfall in January (at my place 1068mm for the month), but after that the rain died. Everything is drying out fast. Closer to Darwin the Howard Sand Plains would be your best bet. There are other areas but it depends on what your travel agenda is. This is the link to a thread I put up for a guide to the plants of the Howard Sand Plains, you should find it interesting.

http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?/topic/60112-field-guide-to-plants-of-darwin-sandsheet-heath/

Many thanks for the info and links - can't really choose when I travel so has to be what it is.  Will be in Darwin for a few days with a car so aim to get out and about and see some of the sights.  Just not planned on what yet!  I'd like to see some of the CPs but my wife won't take kindly to full days trekking to see a 'few weeds' so will have to fit it in with whatever else we aim to see ;-p  Is there a visitors centre at Howards Sand or any suggestion (GPS?) or where to head to?

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