ham

pinguicula accuminata care

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Hello all so i got a pinguicula accuminata as a free plant around 2month ago but the plant has never done well for me, the other plant i got was p.crassifolia which died :V. I grow my pinguiculas under a 6 watt led white light around 30cm above the plants. Medium is is equal parts of crushed coral, peat vocanic sand, volcanic rock, vermiculite and perlite. My temperature during the day ranges from 28-32 and night goes to 21-23 degree celcius. The plant is always dewless and doesnt have any of those tentacles ? I do not have a picture of it yet as i am away but i will post it as soon as i get home. Humidity is around 70% most of the time. 

Can any pinguicula experts enlighten me on why how to keep this plant and does any one keep pinguicula crassifolia?

 

 

Edited by ham

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Could be too hot, this plant comes from very high altitudes, im not sure coral sand is a good idea either...

Edited by manders

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What medium would you recommend? I heard crushed coral helps with alkalinity so im not sure if thats a problem. Ill try reducing temperature by placing the LED further from the plants see if it helps. Currently i also have a gypsicola which is also dewless, u believe it to be temperature related as well.

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I don't know for sure its only a guess on my part, but it does come from very high altitudes, average temp about 15C.  Could be its also going dormant for winter and not producing carnivorous leaves.

I had a gypsicola in coral sand and it died.  Can't prove it was the coral sand but i read somewhere else it was a bad idea as well. Gaz (on CPUK) mentioned gypsum for Gypsicola and it has worked well for me so far.

All mine are out in the greenhouse getting around 10C at this time of year.

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What is your watering regime?   How big is the plant?  Have you tried digging it up and seeing what the roots are doing?

I use a mostly inorganic medium too, I don't use vermiculite and have never tried crushed coral

Minimum temp in my greenhouse has been 7C during the last couple of nights.  Reducing the temperature might help but if you're in the tropics somewhere then this might be difficult.  I have found that new Mexican Pings can sometimes sulk for long periods when they first arrive especially if they're very small, most recover and grow well but unfortunately some just decline until they die.

Try to post a photo if you can.

Good luck with it.

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i see...Yes i do reside in the tropics and its almost impossible for me to reduce the temperature to even 18C and if i do, my electric bill would probably sky rocket. I checked with David Sarc, his the one who sent me the plants and  his pinguiculas are grown in 20-25C. I cant really find any gypsum in my country and the the medium i use is just a mix of as much different organic/inorganic i can find.

I dont think it is going dormant as it doesnt seem to be forming any winter leafs

I water probably once to twice a week once and whenever i see the medium starts to dry i water using the tray method.

Yes, i repotted the plant and the roots seem healthy, it actually is one of the few pinguiculas with larger and long root system

Here are some other pinguiculas which i keep in the same condition and are doing well to okay

- p.debbertiana, p.tina, p. esseriana, p. heterophylla, p. agnata x potosiensis , p. gigantea, p. gracilis , p. cyclosecta and pinguicula macrophylla

ill post a photo probably tomorrow once i go reach home.

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Most inorganic composts are fine, perlite/vermiculite/recycled glass growstones all work fine either mixed with peat or on their own, just not convinced about coral sand...

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I see...i used crushed coral for all my pings and hence i cant see any i help it does. What puts you off from crushed coral? I used quite a lot of it on p. crassifolia when i repotted it and it died in a week...I guess that could be the cause for its death

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What is your source of water?  If it's tap water do you know the ph.  Are you trying to raise the ph with the crushed coral?  I have occasionally added dolomitic lime to a few Pings but never saw any meaningful evidence that it grew stronger plants so I stopped bothering and just used a "mostly inorganic" mix with, like yours, a little peat.  Whatever the answer to all these questions you obviously grow other Pings successfully so the real question is must be what's different about these 2 plants?  Like I mentioned before could just be they didn't settle in and for reasons unknown decided to decline/die.

Sad when it happens but we just keep trying.

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https://imgur.com/a/etSTA

Heres a picture of the plant. I use tap water for all my pings and ph ranges from 7-8. Yes i am trying to create a more alkaline mix for the mexican pings. My guess is just that they are one of the more difficult pings to cultivate. Yes i dont really see any difference when i added crushed coral to the plants...However i just kept using it for a more "diverse mix" . Have you tried using eggshells? I heard from growers that they work, however , if i do experiment with eggshells do you have to remove the layer or "skin" under the egg shell?

Anyway heres a bonus , just saw p.cyclosecta flowering today

https://imgur.com/a/9sTpd

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Nope, i dont use them, i just got an idea to reduce the temperature for the plant, i placed an ice bottle beside the plant. I only placed it there for a few hours and i already saw some positive effects on my p.tina, it got became even dewier :0. 

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I experimented lime powder with this plant, it killed the plant in a week (ping gypsicola as well) and all other pinguiculas who i also tried with lime powder hated it. I believe my temperature is way too high for growing this species, just found out on ping org that they grow in a temperature range of 12-16 degree celsius but i will try growing this species again.

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If you really mean lime (calcium oxide) or slaked like Lime (calcium hydroxide) yes, it will kill most things.  Not a good choice.

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You should be able to get gypsum or at least powdered calcium carbonate (reptile keepers often use it as a feed supplement for example).

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Amazon sells gypsum, that's were I got my gypsum from.

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Thanks for the replies, i already bought powdered caco3 and gypsum from my local nursery :D but it was too late for my ping.gypsicola and accuminata, i made the fatal mistake of adding powdered lime... T_T

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6 watts is a miniscule amount of light, and at 30 cm away from the plants, is nowhere near enough light for them to survive. It shouldn’t have to do with a lack of calcium in the soil, I grow my gypsicola and acuminata in neutral media with no Ca, and they do just fine (calcium carbonate is referred to as lime and my local nursery, I suppose this is why common names are not useful in reality!)

Edited by Benurmanii

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