danielfurman634

New Venus Fly Trap!

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http://imgur.com/a/TwJJM

Well, on Thursday I went to the nearest garden centre due to needing some carnivorous plant soil (Lorbex Carnivorous Plant Compost) and just couldn't resist getting another plant. It's currently sitting in a plate of water, getting morning to late afternoon sun. Hopefully it'll actually stay alive for a while to come (rather than every single one that I've had dying on me, possibly due to growing them above the radiator)

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Hey Daniel, lovely plant (~8

The reasons why they die is usually either being given hard tap water, or being grown indoors during the winter.

They are actually hardy plants, and need to be grown outdoors in full sun if possible, sheltered from too much wind. http://www.growcarnivorousplants.com/Articles.asp?ID=257

Karsty.

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No, it's just a simple wide cylindrical vase, open at the top. The only purpose is to give shelter from the wind, and I guess it fractionally increases the humidity. I had trouble with some others suffering from being too wind blown, they just couldn't get going, and I reckon it keeps setting off the traps which can kill the plants when it's too often and not catching food.

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10 hours ago, Karsty said:

Hey Daniel, lovely plant (~8

The reasons why they die is usually either being given hard tap water, or being grown indoors during the winter.

They are actually hardy plants, and need to be grown outdoors in full sun if possible, sheltered from too much wind. http://www.growcarnivorousplants.com/Articles.asp?ID=257

Karsty.

Thanks :) I'm currently growing them on a south facing kitchen windowsill which is probably the only place I can keep it seeing as I can either keep the plant on the left of the house (avoids most of the morning sun) or in the right (where it gets the morning sun and some midday, but that's all) And I don't think I'd have something that could shelter it from the wind. Actually, would this be alright as a place to grow it? http://imgur.com/a/ALeq8

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It might be ok for the summer Daniel, but it needs a cold winter rest. Room temperatures through the winter spell certain death.

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5 minutes ago, Karsty said:

It might be ok for the summer Daniel, but it needs a cold winter rest. Room temperatures through the winter spell certain death.

Thanks again. Would you recommend I take it outside/in the shed sometime in October and if it'd still be alright with less direct sunlight/below -5 degree nights? I'm just worried if I leave it out when there's a frost, it'll die and not recover when spring comes.

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Well, in dormancy it can easily take -7°C, and they also experience the occasional drop to -12°C. Some people keep them in the fridge for the winter, although I've never tried that! Last winter I had 6 different clones live happily outside. The main thing is, stop thinking about it as a tropical sensitive plant! All it doesn't like is a lot of wind. They can tolerate lower light conditions in the winter, so from what you're saying you shed should be ok. But in the winter, frost will not kill them. Be brave!

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It seems the only word of caution here is there might be some danger if the freeze gets too far into the roots. When they grow in habitat they are in the ground, not in an isolated ball of soil, so the frost does not penetrate so easily down into the full extent of the roots. But if you check out the web page I linked to, they still seem to be much tougher than we think.

Edited by Karsty

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2 hours ago, Karsty said:

It seems the only word of caution here is there might be some danger if the freeze gets too far into the roots. When they grow in habitat they are in the ground, not in an isolated ball of soil, so the frost does not penetrate so easily down into the full extent of the roots. But if you check out the web page I linked to, they still seem to be much tougher than we think.

Finished reading the whole article and I think I might let it grow on the left side of my garden, where it'll likely get sun between 11am and sunset. Then I'll probably take it into the shed around the end of October (west-facing window, so it'll only get a couple hours of sunlight a day) Do you have any tips to protect them from the wind (apart from the vase as I kinda doubt my dad will have anything similar lying around)

Edited by danielfurman634

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3 hours ago, Karsty said:

It might be ok for the summer Daniel, but it needs a cold winter rest. Room temperatures through the winter spell certain death.

Sorry to contradict, but this assertion is misleading. Keeping VFTs on a sunny windowsill indoors over winter will not spell certain death. I've been keeping them successfully all year round on south-facing kitchen window sills (in 3 properties) for the past 31 years. In my experience, it's the shorter photoperiod during winter months that mainly influences dormancy.

I also have some VFTs that grow outside in plastic planters that have survived the past 7 winters unprotected.

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Wowzers!!! That's food for thought. I've only ever had them die indoors through winter, and most cultural instructions say they need a cool but frost free winter.

With such a vast variety of clones, is it possible that some do better in warm winters than others?

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9 hours ago, Karsty said:

 

With such a vast variety of clones, is it possible that some do better in warm winters than others?

I'm not a VFT collector so have only ever kept the natural form and a giant form (G16). Both types thrive on a south-facing windowsill throughout the year. I keep only the natural form outdoors.

I don't know how resilient the many VFT clones/cultivars/mutants are to conditions that are less than optimal.

From 1986 to 1994 I lived in a second floor flat and each spring had to throw away surplus plants when I repotted them. I can't understand why yours died overwintering indoors.

In my opinion, here in the UK, an unheated greenhouse is the best environment for VFTs but I've always found them to be surprisingly robust providing the basic specific requirements of Sphagnum peat substrate, soft water and direct sunlight are met.

 

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On 27-8-2017 at 9:53 AM, Karsty said:

With such a vast variety of clones, is it possible that some do better in warm winters than others?

It's technically possible, but unlikely, because the clones are always selected for their looks and not for their ability to handle unnatural growing conditions.

On 26-8-2017 at 10:45 PM, acheta said:

Sorry to contradict, but this assertion is misleading. Keeping VFTs on a sunny windowsill indoors over winter will not spell certain death. I've been keeping them successfully all year round on south-facing kitchen window sills (in 3 properties) for the past 31 years. In my experience, it's the shorter photoperiod during winter months that mainly influences dormancy.

I also have some VFTs that grow outside in plastic planters that have survived the past 7 winters unprotected.

What are your indoor temperatures?

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1 hour ago, carambola said:

What are your indoor temperatures?

There is no constant kitchen temperature. I estimate that in the winter the ambient room temperature varies between approximately18°C and 23°C. It fluctuates depending on whether the central heating's on, whether food's being cooked, whether the window's open and what the weather's like. The plants die back with the shortening day length and temperature's never given me any cause for concern.

Things may not be so straightforward in countries that have a different climate and day length though.

Here's a photo of my indoor VFTs (G16s) taken today. All of these plants were in only one pot until this spring when I divided them to fit into two pots.

indoorvft.jpg

For comparison, these are the G16s that reside in the greenhouse:

ghousevfts.jpg

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Interesting, thanks for the information and pictures. They seem greener, smaller and more stretched out than they would be outside, but they still look pretty good considering their abnormal growing conditions. I have a feeling this will be a new long term experiment for me.

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3 hours ago, carambola said:

Interesting, thanks for the information and pictures. They seem greener, smaller and more stretched out than they would be outside, but they still look pretty good considering their abnormal growing conditions. I have a feeling this will be a new long term experiment for me.

Yes, they grow differently inside the house. Even though they're in a south-facing window they receive less than 50% of available sunlight than they would if they were outside or in a greenhouse.

2 hours ago, Deg said:

Wow those plants look amazing. How old are they?

Thank you. All of the plants in the photos are descended from just one (giant) plant that I was given 7 years ago (in July 2010). They've been propagated by division each year. I've only had a greenhouse for the past four summers.

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