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Benurmanii

P. chilensis (with a flower)

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My P. chilensis have done very well this spring, despite being set back during the winter by freezing winds (will do better to keep them from drying next winter). The flower looks white in the photo, but the colors are inaccurate due to the fluorescent lighting (my temperate Pinguicula are moved in towards the end of spring to protect against hot temps during summer). In reality, the color is a very light lilac.

EDpVswj.jpg

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Bonjour

very nice success :wub: you grow them in pure sphagnum ?

jeff

 

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Thank you! These are in lfs mixed with some perlite, although I have better success getting the seeds to grow faster on 1:1 peat/pumice mix. I think they like to have fairly dense soil around their roots, and if the lfs is not well chopped or ground, the small roots of the seedlings hit pockets of air and they do not do well. The larger, already established plants do well transplanted into un-chopped lfs, which is how I received mine originally.

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14 minutes ago, Benurmanii said:

Thank you! These are in lfs mixed with some perlite, although I have better success getting the seeds to grow faster on 1:1 peat/pumice mix. I think they like to have fairly dense soil around their roots, and if the lfs is not well chopped or ground, the small roots of the seedlings hit pockets of air and they do not do well. The larger, already established plants do well transplanted into un-chopped lfs, which is how I received mine originally.

You have beautiful plants!!!!

Can I ask You a question? I've got a lot of seed-grown p. chilensis, boarn fron seeds of my death plants... I'm growing them in peat-sand soil, quite wet... a lot of them tourn yellow-brown the down leaves, than the growing point and die... do you think it is due to the extremely dense soil around the roots? thanks a lot

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Argo, do you give them a winter rest? This sounds like what happened to one of my plants that did not receive a winter cold/freezing period. They seem to only be able to skip just one winter.

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Thanks a lot!! Here in south Italy there are never colder temperatures than 4 C...so ir is possible that it is like You Tell!!! I'm agree with You

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I noticed the effect of yellowing and short life-span on the second chilensis that was beginning to be effected went away after being moved to conditions where day temps were consistently around 10-12 celsius, and nights cooler than that. I am not sure exactly how cold they need to be for proper winter rest, but since they essentially stop growing when temps near freezing, I am curious to know if fridge dormancy may work for them, even though they do not form hibernacula.

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14 minutes ago, Benurmanii said:

I noticed the effect of yellowing and short life-span on the second chilensis that was beginning to be effected went away after being moved to conditions where day temps were consistently around 10-12 celsius, and nights cooler than that. I am not sure exactly how cold they need to be for proper winter rest, but since they essentially stop growing when temps near freezing, I am curious to know if fridge dormancy may work for them, even though they do not form hibernacula.

I also will try it!

in my experience, my two adulte plants (now dead) Made 5 flowers each one... They always self pollinated like lusitanica... After flowering The plants has divided: each one Made two divisions, that grew and after about a month flowered... After that here in South Italy the climate is too hot and dry, and they slowly died

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Yes, they also seem to dislike hot temps when there is low air humidity. Mine can handle temps up to 30 °C no problem, but the humidity is always at least 55%.

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I actually moved mine in during March. They for sure will not be able to handle our summers, but I discovered that even the winds we get during our wet springs dry the plants out too much. Any days that were cloudless was accompanied by sub 50% RH conditions, not good for these plants that lost their roots during winter dry-freezing.

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I agree... Now I'm growing them outside, in shadow, covered with the upper part of a buttle without tap...so i make a little higer humidity

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Bonjour

these plant in situ grow between 1400 to 2300m always in wet condition  an for may to november even under the snow

jeff

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