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domi

What soil for european temperate pinguicula?

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What soil can I use for european temperate pinguicula like p. alpina and p.vulgaris?
Do they need rain water?

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Any type of 'standard' carnivorous mix will suffice - peat & perlite, peat & sand etc.

Only water with rain water which is low in dissolved minerals. 

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i grow alpina and vulgaris in a peat /perlite mix with a bit of crushed lime stone added

But not all temperate pings like lime added to the mixture

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Thank you both

Another question, can you help me recognize them? p. alpina and p. vulgaris?

 

Edited by domi

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the top photo could be p.alpina but they should be dormant now and in the hibernacula stage.

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On 1/11/2016 at 6:53 PM, ada said:

the top photo could be p.alpina but they should be dormant now and in the hibernacula stage.

He told me that most of his plants are dormant, but this one is still awake.

Any idea for the other one? 

Edited by domi

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Too small to tell yet,even when bigger we need a flower to be sure.

try a search on here,i have posted lots of ping pictures,some on fb too

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I'm also starting with European Pinguicula.  Do you think the peat based media, which has fairly low pH, works with species growing in calcareous/alkaline soil?  For example, Pinguicula dertosensis, P. longifolia subsp. causensis, P. poldinii etc.  This page  ([url=http://www.pinguicula.org/pages/plantes/pinguicula_dertosensis.htm]link[/url]) suggests fairly complicated, mineral based substrate.  But I can't find those in the US.  So I'm wondering if some of you might have tried something simpler, and worked.

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Bonjour

you can use cat litter ( Non-agglomerating and perfumed) with river sand for all the calcareous ( mexican,temperate,cuban).

jeff

 

 

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On Tuesday, April 18, 2017 at 8:19 AM, jeff 1 said:

Bonjour

you can use cat litter ( Non-agglomerating and perfumed) with river sand for all the calcareous ( mexican,temperate,cuban).

jeff

 

 

Hello Jeff, I did not know the Cuban Pinguicula grew in calcareous soils. Could this be a reason for my P. cubensis growing very pale leaves? Interestingly, the ones I grew in peat seemed to lack this condition, but they did not do well longterm as it would rot their roots off. I figured it was some sort of nitrogen defficiency, as feeding them with foliar fertilizer helped make the next leaf greener, but the old leaves would not dew back up even after a very light feeding.

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for cuban species some one grow in calcareous soils , but others on serpentin rock , others on  tree trunk , other in white sand but rich in organic matter below

you grow them in shade or full sun ? have you  used, fish glitter, rather than a leaf fertilizer ?

P.cubensis grow on serpentine rock always wet then with a big air hygromety sometimes in full sun,always also in 20-28 °c , According to some authors it would be annual 'in situ', and may be triannual in culture.

I think that people more competent than me on these species will be able to better answer you.

jeff

 

 

 

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I have only encountered one other person growing P. cubensis who has great success with it in peat.

I also talked to Paul Temple, who suggested high humidity for them, which helped quicken the pace of growth for some. It is possible that much plants never got fully established after receiving them from BCP due to not giving them high humidity (they arrived without roots). I keep them in the temp range you display under two T5HO bulbs, in a tank with my petiolaris Drosera, always sitting in water, RH always around 80%, probably higher at night. I will get pics of the setup when I get home.

When Ifeed them, I used maxsea spray, 1/4 tsp per gallon.

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I can show next signs for exterminating P. alpina and P. vulgaris if they are not in flowering time: http://www2.arnes.si/~sopjslat/mesojedke/mesojedk.htm (it is not in English but you will understand the pictures anyway ;).

You can see the roots of P. alpina (the left one), which are strong, yellow, with one redish main root. They are present at wintertime also. The plant on the right is P. vulgaris, the roots are pale white tufted roots, absent in winter.

When the plants stop flowering, you still can recognize P. alpina, its flower stalk is rough and in P. vulgaris is rounded.

It seems they don't care much about the soil type. They grow on sphagnum or silica sand or limestone equally. I prefer one exposition on travertine stone, which is always in water and is covered with mosses. This seems to be just right one as evaporation of water lower temperature in summertime. They get sunshine only to 10 o'clock in the morning, later they are in shadow. The main trouble are blackbirds (Tordus merula), they use the plants for nests or maybe they eat winter hibernacula.

 

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yes  for P.alpina  and P.vulgaris  'in situ' we find them both on limestone and acidic soils .

But for other temperates rather on acidic soils or on many others , limestone soil

jeff

 

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