Over killer price on carnivorous plants


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Everyone has a top price they can afford to pay.  Someone will always pay a bit extra to be one of the first to own/grow a new plant.

This will never change no matter what is for sale.

People forget the time and extra effort some of these plants take to grow from seed or cuttings to get to a decent size.

Don't complain about what others can afford,just wait a while,have patience it will get cheaper in a few years.

or save £1 or 1euro every week while you wait,then you wont miss a big some of money when the plant is available again.

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It is not the point. It is not difficult to grow carnivorous plants and you can multiply them very easily in a short time. I would personally not sell just to earn money on the plants I need to sell but would rather spread this hobby out to everyone who wants to try these exciting plants. It's just my opinion. Good growth on this fantastic forum. [emoji39][emoji39][emoji106][emoji106]

Sendt fra min EVA-L09 med Tapatalk

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The way I look at it is that for £150 I can buy quite a lot of plants I like but, as Ada says, everyone has a top price they are prepared to pay and different budgets to keep to. I must admit that my own upper price limit has crept up over the years.

I still couldn't afford over £100 per plant just in case I was 1) careless enough to kill it or 2) my wife found out I spent that much on a plant.  Even so I don't seem to be able to stop that upper limit rising year on year.

Just buy the plants you can afford and enjoy growing them, I still get as much satisfaction from growing a new Ping for a couple of pounds as I do from a new Ariocarpus (cactus) for nearly 20.

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I still get a kick out of growing a Drosera capensis and cheap plants are great.  On the other hand would I pay over 100£ for an N. Edwardsiana the size of gnats eyeball, well yes, if i could just figure out a way to smuggle it into the greenouse and pretend its an odd looking maxima when 'she who must be obeyed' spots it. 

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42 minutes ago, manders said:

I still get a kick out of growing a Drosera capensis and cheap plants are great.  On the other hand would I pay over 100£ for an N. Edwardsiana the size of gnats eyeball, well yes, if i could just figure out a way to smuggle it into the greenouse and pretend its an odd looking maxima when 'she who must be obeyed' spots it. 

:biggrin:

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The seller will most likely of had to purchase their ' mother plant ' at some point and will most likely have paid a fair sum, if they are lucky enough the plant will grow well and be able to be divided and sold to recover the original cost, any further divisions are a bonus. 

Seed grown Cephs can take an age to grow , add to that a sought after clone and you have something that's in demand. 

I have a couple of sought after clones that I had planned to do this with but 2 years on and they haven't grown enough to be divided, I haven't been successful in any leaf pullings either with them so it is still a gamble.

 

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Some are sky high - yes, but others can be found at better prices if you shop around, buy young plants, ones that need some rehabilitation, sow seeds or wait until you find it at a price you can afford.  I generally get much more pleasure growing young tiny plants and watching them develop or rehabilitating rather than buying much more mature healthy ones.  

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Can't speak for sky high prices, but commerce drives the spread of plants.  If sellers aren't rewarded for their sale, there's less incentive to get their product out into circulation.   Less reward=less incentive and higher reward=higher incentive.

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yea, it is a give an take. 

supply/demand determines market value.

Cp's as a whole I believe are priced well, for the most part they are priced low enough to be attainable but still enough margin to encourage market growth.

But some species are more expensive than others however the biggest hurdle isn't pricing but instead look into the root cause which is distribution. If there were more in circulation then the prices would be lower overall. 

Personally, I find the potential market prospects exciting! Even during my short time in the hobby; it has grown steadily and almost to a point where it is no longer considered a niche. Without this demand, the many varieties we enjoy simply would not exist. I believe that such demand is necessary to "grow" the market as a whole and compensation for efforts is for the most part fair I believe.

Think of what you are getting in the amount of time you save. They spend a lot of time not only acquiring a variety of plants but some spend even more time growing and creating new varieties as well. Without our strong vendor support, imagine what all of our prized collections would look like? We would have to spend countless hours trudging around and looking for every plant discouraging a great many of us from even becoming interested in them. 

IMHO vendors as a whole really make cp's and the community what it is.

Edited by cpbobby
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I will say I was very shocked at seeing a plant go for this much - http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Cephalotus-follicular-is-Tank-2-Mature-plant-/232080433860?hash=item36091262c4:g:lBsAAOSwFdtX1xxs

Thinking of getting a cephalotus as something different from dionaea but certainly not for that!, 

I don't really understand why some would cost so much surely the only difference is colour and size?

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