CP's with names that end with two ii


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Good question. I know 'ii in Latin is pronounced 'ee-i'

 

So readii is 'read-ee-eye'

 

But moorei is pronounced 'moor-ree-eye' but only has one i.

 

Is harperi 'har-per-rye' or 'har-perry-eye' though? I've always stuck with the first.

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I think it might just be random e.g. nepenthes attenboroughii after David Attenborough, but sarracenia moorei after David Moore (which was originally called mooreana!)

 

Sarracenia catesbaei was originally called catesbyi as well.

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Being italian and having studied latin in high school , i can assure you that - ii  is pronounced  "ee-ee "
So , mooreii is "moore - ee - ee " , chelsonii chelson- ee - ee , slackii  slack -ee - ee etc 
Harperi is pronounced simply " harper- ee " , but with a short " ee " 
I've never heard of "ee - i " pronunciation in latin , but I can't tell for sure it is wrong; it just doesn't sound latin though ..

Hope this can be of some help :) 

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I was always told nobody for sure know exactly how Latin sounded or was pronounced, for obvious reasons!

 

Presumably every speaker adds the influence of their modern day language to Latin pronunciations.

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It could be ,but for sure, I don't think it could ever been read with a pronounce  similar to english. If you would like to try a pronunciation similar to latin you should try with a spanish or italian way to read , I think ..
Truth be told, though , even French reads in a different way vowels .. so .. who knows D: 

 

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I thought I would check this out with Kew this is what they said

Plant names ending in -i or -ii are usually named after people. According to the official rules of Plant Nomenclature, in order to turn a person's name into a Latin form (since plant names are traditionally in Latin or Latinized) you must add an -i ending to names that end in a vowel or a y and -ii to names that don't end in er or a vowel. Names ending in er would end -eri and names ending in an a have an -e added to the end of them.

For example, a plant named after someone called Cooper would be Latinized as cooperi, after Terry would be terryi and after Smith would be smithii. Of course sometimes there are errors where this rule is not followed and the names smithi and smithii might appear for the same species, but these errors should be corrected to the appropriate ending.

For detailed discussion of plant name spelling you can look at Article 60 of the Code of Nomenclature available online at: http://www.iapt-taxon.org/nomen/main.php?page=art60

Edited by Deltatango301
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I was always told nobody for sure know exactly how Latin sounded or was pronounced, for obvious reasons!

 

Presumably every speaker adds the influence of their modern day language to Latin pronunciations.

Umm... Could be. You just say it the way its spelled with Latin pronunciations. You don't use English because it is a misfit. I simply do not pronounce the second "ee". So I say "Nepenthes lowy" I have no idea why they do this weird thing.

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  • 2 months later...

In Latin the "i" and "ii" at the end is the "genitive" and it means that a plant is discovered or created from a person... e.g: "Slackii" is discovered from Slack... Poldini is the sourname of an italian teacher... when he discovered that a pinguicula was a new specie, he called it "pinguicula Poldinii"...,  in Latin is like English form "'s"...(e.g.: Poldini's pinguicula) 

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