Terrestrial Utrics - how the smeg do you tell them apart?


lesthegringo
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Ok, Reniformis is easy, Longifolia not so difficult, but let's face it without a flower it is bloody difficult to tell most of the little terrestrials apart! I have three or four types in my various Sarra, Nepenthes, Dionaea and other pots, and I have no idea what they are.

 

All I can do is describe the leaf, such as - 1mm wide, green, strap shaped, up to 15mm long. Really helpful when one of the other is 1mm wide, green, strap shaped, up to 10mm long.

 

So what's the way to tell them apart when there are no flowers?

 

Cheers

 

Les

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Some have very distinctive leaves, others are very similar. In order to ID without flowers would probably involve scrutinising the plant under a microscope as the traps are very distinctive. Probably beyond the realms of an amateur

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I take it your talking about U subulata? The weedy form seems to produce mainly cleistogamous flowers. I do not know why as I have had a form with normal flowers behave properly.

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If that is the only species that does so, perhaps that answers the ID question, however there is a lot of variability between the lengths of the leaves between the different pots they are in. Each pot seems to be covered with lots of leaves of similar sizes, but they do differ significantly from pot to pot, which is why I assumed (wrongly?) that they were different SSP's

 

Les

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