Sign in to follow this  
Daveth

Hose Mountain Expedition, September 2015

Recommended Posts

This is a selection of pictures from the recent Redfern expedition to Hose Mountain, in central Borneo, with an additional ascent of Trus Madi, the second highest peak after Kinabalu at 2,642 metres. Aware that Vincent posted many pictures from Trus Madi, I have tried to complement his picture set. I have kept the picture sizes small so as not to dis-advantage viewers with poor internet connections. If anyone wants an original, please ask.

 

Trus Madi

 

image.jpg

 

This is a distant shot of the Trus Madi ridge, with the double peak to the right, the summit being on the far right. The notch between the two peaks holds a lovely mossy forest. After a lot of recent expenditure, the reserve has a new entrance gateway, accommodation block and boardwalk on the lower mountain reaches

 

image.jpg

 

Beyond the boardwalk it is a clear trail up, though there are a few roped sections and the odd bit of metalwork to assist.

image.jpg

 

 There are some lovely mossy forest sections on the way up

image.jpg

 

already rich in orchids, though few were in flower at the time. After much ascent, and sort of being convinced that Nepenthes were entirely absent, I rounded a bend in the trail and suddenly came upon stands of N.lowii.

 

image.jpg

 

The habitat is worth showing as it does give a better appreciation of the conditions this species prefers.

 

image.jpg

 

The "trees" in the mossy forest are short (perhaps 4-6m) and the vines scramble through them in the more open sections. Pretty much everything that is fixed down is moss covered, and the branches can be "wrung out" if you squeeze the moss.

 

P1030429.jpg

 

Pitchers hang at various heights and the path passes underneath some, whilst others rest on the mossy floor.

 

P1030403.jpg

 

This species is "famous" for being a loo for shrews, and i am pretty sure this is what fills this pitcher

 

image.jpg

 

whilst Stewart pointed out a pitcher with an infaunal community of mosquito larvae which call lowii pitchers their "nursery".

 

image.jpg

 

This is, of course, cloud forest and moving higher and beyond the main lowii stands meant that visibility often dropped off

 

image.jpg

 

with James here ascending via ropes and ladders up a very cloudy face. From the first photo in this post you will recall the twin peaks, and this photo is taken from the first (with its new shiny observation tower), looking back along the ridges to the telecomms unit just along the ridge. The path passes alongside this.

 

image.jpg

 

This picture gives some idea of the steepness of the slopes but also, because of altitudinal opportunities, how narrow the high mossy forest areas are. Between the observation tower and summit, from which this photo was taken, is a fine mossy forest in the dip between the higher ground.

P1030558.jpg

 

This is home to the population of Nepenthes macrophylla.

P1030537.jpg

 

Obligatory omg shot, I am afraid!

 

P1030552.jpg

 

I am allowed one/post!

 

If anything, this macrophylla forest was even mossier than the lowii one

 

P1030555.jpg

 

P1030572.jpg

 

Eventually, Team Hose reaches the summit of Trus Madi.

 

P1030562.jpg

 

Marc, James, Stewart, me and Richard.

 

Of course, where you have 2 species, one can have hybrids, and my descent with our guide (I set off early as i am always much slower descending) resulted in seeing 3 of the 5 known (to our guide) Nepenthes x trusmadiensis plants.

 

P1030594.jpg

P1030596.jpg

P1030607.jpg

 

Of particular note is the weaker peristome, with relatively poorly formed teeth (and these are much softer to the touch than the sharp macrophylla ones), and the noticeable waist to the pitcher. The last photo was from a plant scrambling through a tree canopy level with the path, so steep is the drop from the ridge.

 

 

Hose Mountain

to be completed another day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazing pics of an (I guess) amazing trip. I thought the population of N. Trusmadiensis was bigger than that in the wild! Is there more locations with it?

 

Thanks for sharing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazing pics of an (I guess) amazing trip. I thought the population of N. Trusmadiensis was bigger than that in the wild! Is there more locations with it?

 

Thanks for sharing.

I am sure there, in reality are, but i guess the issues are that 1) macrophylla as 1 parent is, as far as i know, only found in that small mossy forest, 2) the sides are horribly steep, ruling out both opportunity and ability to survey, and 3) the amount of damage you would cause to the mossy forest to look for it outweighs knowing there are at least 5 plants.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How does one increase the number of photos in this post? I just spent an hour adding text and photos only to be told it exceeds the number allowed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great pictures! Thanks for sharing.

This brings back some fantastic memories...

I'm looking forward to see Hose Mountains soon  ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this