Sign in to follow this  
CephFan

New Cephalotus cuttings / pullings: propagation and potting

Recommended Posts

Evening All,

I have put this on FB but I thought I would post it here as it is easier to search for later if anyone is interested.

 

I put seven pitcher cuttings (or 'pullings' if you prefer... I don't care!) into live sphagnum in the early summer and had left them there without any intervention other than occasional peering in. No rooting gel or anything additional other than rainwater.

 

I use small food containers which then sit in steady temperatures under some not too intense LED lights
gallery_8721_835_871757.jpg

 

Plenty of new growth in there when I took the lid off today
gallery_8721_835_79224.jpg

 

I picked off the sphagnum and all seven pitchers had new growth
gallery_8721_835_203772.jpg

 

Now to potting up. I am NOT saying this is the 'right' way to do it nor am I claiming to be an expert but it works for me. I use perforated pond pots and mound the compost in the middle.
gallery_8721_835_1142182.jpg

 

I then carefully plant the new plantlet with the roots carefully dropped into a hole made with a dibber.
gallery_8721_835_374645.jpg

 

Finally I put some lime-free gravel (crushed granite in this case) around the mound which helps stabilise it while watering and also looks nice.
gallery_8721_835_1043446.jpg

 

So seven pitchers become seven new plants labelled and ready for the greenhouse.
gallery_8721_835_291829.jpg

 

Cheers,
Steve

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I put seven pitcher cuttings into live sphagnum in the early summer and had left them there 

 

Cheers Steve for the great job u have done!  :tu:

 

Just for the protocol - maybe u should add under what temps u root them.  Because if I put cuttings for rooting in early summer in my climate in Bulgaria, my success will be 0% and dead cuttings in no time due to my hot temps. :yes:

Edited by dimitar
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dimitar,

Yes that's a fair point.

Temperature - I generally have the cuttings in their closed boxes in the shed (which has 2" / 5cm of glass fibre insulation so fairly stable).

These are lit by low power white LED lights which produce a little warmth but not much and are controlled by a timer.

I have an electronic thermometer module (£3 from eBay) with a remote probe in the closed container the whole lot are in and the temp seems to stay at around 20-24C during the day (falling a little at night.

The key seems to be not too intense (temp or lighting) and steady conditions.

Cheers

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

100% success rate, that's an impressive result, thanks for pics Steve, first good shots of pitcher pullings I've seen rather than leaf.

I lost a couple of rooted leaf pulls after I transferred from sphagnum to peat, it may have been coincidence but now I keep the roots in a sphagnum ball and then plant that into the peat.

Have you had any losses in the past after transfer?

Nice work

Cheers Chris

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Chris,

That is a very real issue and some of them can take a hit. The transfer from 100% humidity is a shock. I have piled a little heap of live sphagnum over the leaves to keep them going for now.

Cheers

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine wern't in a sealed container, just a plastic cup filled with sphagnum and the leaves pushed in around the sides.

There shouldn't have been any humidity issues in my case which made me think the " shock " was from the rapid change of medium.

I just try and keep things as steady and stable as I can but still with limited success.

Some of my " runt " pullings that I thought wouldn't make it have done really well the last couple of months whereas a very prolific pulling I had high hopes for has all but shrivelled to nothing.

A very frustrating plant at times but I guess that's what makes it so rewarding when they thrive.

Cheers Chris

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks to me like you transferred them with just the right amount of root development. I like to get them transferred before the roots become too long.  Nice job

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done Steve, its nice to have success with Ceph pullings, especially 100% I only managed 85% with leaf pullings this year, but as you say more babies for the greenhouse.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well DT301 it doesn't seem to matter too much in terms of getting roots and shoots forming. However in general the bigger the cutting, the stronger the new plant will be, at least initially. However a small leaf and plant should grown on just as well in time.

Cheers

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well DT301 it doesn't seem to matter too much in terms of getting roots and shoots forming. However in general the bigger the cutting, the stronger the new plant will be, at least initially. However a small leaf and plant should grown on just as well in time.

Cheers

Steve

Thanks Steve, is there a certain way of pulling the pitchers off the plant up or down ?

image.jpeg

Edited by Deltatango301
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi DT301, sorry I missed your post in the Xmas rush.

'Down'' is best but done at the join at the petiole or stalk and the stem. Hold the leaf/pitcher and then use a match stick or similar to push at the join to try to get a small 'heel' of stem of the plant.

Cheers,

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My live sphagnum moss is in transit to me, going to pull 6 pullings and keep them in a simular container

And keep it on my bedroom windowsill which is a constant 22c see how we get on

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have done the pullings and added them to the live moss

How long did you wait for the rooting before you potted on

Btw I have just laid them on top of the moss is this ok

image_3.jpeg

Edited by Deltatango301

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi DT,

I would drain that excess water off there, it is not needed if the moss is damp. The time it takes depends on the cuttings. It can easily be 8 weeks. It won't do any harm to have a look after say 6 weeks to see if there are any signs of roots. Just tease one out and check it, if there is nothing happening then leave it for a couple more weeks.

Cheers

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good luck mate, it will be good to see what success rate you get.

I knocked a hummers pitcher of recently and had a go with that but it turned black and died off in a matter of days...

All the while your leaves or pitchers are green there's a good chance they'll strike.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at these little pods sitting in the moss reminds of the 1956 film

Invasion of the Body Snatchers The older ones will remember have fun

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I spotted that Pets at Home sell live Sphagnum moss for reptiles and other uses.

It isn't exactly inexpensive (£7) but it seems to be very good.

The moss I bought was a red variety.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also added some leaf pullings and after 2 weeks all are looking good and upright

The moss is also growing so something must be right will post again in 2 weeks time

image_8.jpeg

Edited by Deltatango301

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried it at the seventh of March. I took every broken bit into the box. I watered it with rainwater and a trace of borax into the water.

There were a few crowns included which already grew some 1 cm long roots after 3 weeks. None yet grew roots from leafs and pitchers, as far I could see.

 

The Sphagnum is quite loose so looking without disturbing is not very difficult.

 

I could already harvest two times Sphagnum which is growing like mad and lost 4 pitchers which had been a little bit damaged during picking, like no lid or a bit crushed.

 

It is not necessary that you have a long stem on the pitchers, like everybody says.

I found this in another forum

http://ocps.proboards.com/thread/1041/root-ceph-pitcher

 

I took even pitchers adult or juvenile or without any stem just for an experiment, before I found this example. One still alive, has even a hole instead of a stem.

 

 

Thank you very much for the tip, this is a break through for me.

Edited by partisangardener

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this