Sign in to follow this  
dimitar

Cephalotus - autumn pictures.

Recommended Posts

As we all know well, the autumn encourage the intensity of Cephalotus coloration due to low temps, I think it will be interesting for all of us to share pics of our Cephalotus plants under different conditions..

 

Please, feel free to post pictures

 

Here is one of mine in this gloomy day.

 

PB160039_zpsqp1m9vgj.jpg

 

PB160005_zpsvogulncm.jpg

 

PB160006_zpsd7nzxkml.jpg

 

PB160034_zpstjeiufbg.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks.

 

We continue with more fall color.

 

Cephalotus Two Peoples Bay seed grown

 

P6060015%202_zpsqge8llst.jpg

 

Cephalotus Two Peoples Bay seed grown

 

PA250040_zpspnpqdtds.jpg

 

Cephalotus "Big Boy"

 

PB080008_zps7kjqjou7.jpg

 

Cephalotus Coal Mine Beach seed grown

 

PB090013_zpskqmm4wx6.jpg

 

Cephalotus Northclife seed grown from the same batch with the plant below.

 

PB160005_zpsficnklhx.jpg

 

Cephalotus Northclife DD-C001

 

PB160030_zpsrrixjngg.jpg

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cephalotus Follicularis

gallery_9058_873_39753.jpg 

 

Dimitar, not as much colouration as yours but grown in a much cooler climate, over hear in North Wales.

With you having a much warmer and longer period of warm and sunny temperatures do you think this helps in the colouration of the traps.?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ron, what u have shown is healthy and very well colored plant. It is much more colored and beautuful than many other cultivars and named plants.

 

With you having a much warmer and longer period of warm and sunny temperatures do you think this helps in the colouration of the traps.?

 

My Cephs get sun only in the winter when the temps are cold enough. The rest of the year just bright light and under shade cloth in the summer. However, I don't think the sun is key factor for good coloration, rather than the cold...Cheers mate.

Edited by dimitar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From my experience and the comments of others, the best colouration comes not just due to being cold and getting direct sunlight, but due a good variation in temperaure from night to day.  I have seen quotes of the variation needing to be a least 10oC for good colour.  This is is best seen here when there are frosts followed by sunny days, but I have also seen plants colour up well when there was a similar variation between night and day without it being quite so cold, provided they have good sun exposure.  So it may not be a matter of not being cold enough, but rather it not being warm enough in the day after a cold night.  The question I suppose is, how cold does it need to be for this to be effective?

 

 

 

Then again, I have plants that just ignore all this and either refuse to colour up, or colour up regardless of the conditions, even without seeming to get the direct sun needed.  Evidently they still get enough light to respond.

Edited by Marcus B
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 

  The question I suppose is, how cold does it need to be for this to be effective?

 

 

This is very interesting, but difficult question.

 

 

All the results are in greenhouse frost free conditions:

 

The color in full sun and temps down to 2C at night and 12-16C day.

 

P3170002_zpsmvhepsfb.jpg

 

Under diffused light approx 60% sun and temps 28C day to 10-12C at night. ( my beloved plant) 

 

PB200011_zpsnai8cxgj.jpg

 

Just bright light without sun in possition close to the bubble nylon. Temps down to 4C at night and no more than 10C day.

 

P2020014_zpscvl2zxtv.jpg

 

 

But the same plant got its best color in the mid spring under temps 28-35C day to 12-16C at night in the same possition.

 

P5240003%202_zpspu0agzps.jpg

 

P5240005%202_zpschl4dhz6.jpg

 

P5240025_zpshnsm9emy.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Edited by dimitar
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great photos!  This would seem to support the notion of the temperature variation being important in colour production, but it not necessarily needing to be as great as previously suggested.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That one is getting darker. Seed grown Cephalotus Coal Mine Beach variation, a plant that i'm proud of due to its shape...

 

PB240006_zpsq3uqqgzh.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That one is getting darker. Seed grown Cephalotus Coal Mine Beach variation, a plant that i'm proud of due to its shape...

 

I like this squat form. I find Cephalotus with unusual pitcher shapes more interesting than dark or large pitcher clones. This one has both unusual pitcher shape and good colouration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 I find Cephalotus with unusual pitcher shapes more interesting than dark or large pitcher clones. 

 

So true. I agree. It would appear that only the shape is stable with these plants.

 

The coloration or the pitcher size both are unstable and greatly vary under different growing conditions and very often u may end up disappointed if u buy " giant or dark reputated " plant...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now heres a controversial question.... But does good colouration mean healthy? or is it in fact the plant attempting to adapt to less favourable conditions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think this colour costs the plant certainly something, but with me it seems to harden it.

My oldest plant already shown how it is now here

http://ocps.proboards.com/thread/7518/make-sloped-vertical-grow-cephs?page=2

It started to colour up last autumn at a west facing widow cold conditions between 2 and 10 C° under artificial extra light for 10 hours a day since December 2014.

First Picture November 2014

Cephalotus-nov2014_zps4ztakmv3.jpg

Second picture from 5. January 2015

Cephalotus-5.Jan2015_zpskobxkdar.jpg

Third picture from 23 January 2015

Cephalotus23.jan2015_zpszxupkgsr.jpg

 

Fourth picture from 12.3.2015

Cephalotus%202015-12.3._zpszphu8olr.jpg

 

Fifth picture short before it went into the garden.

Cephalotus-01.04.2015_zpsfhuhkupy.jpg

 

The other side was more exposed to the sun and got much darker at the same time first of april 2015

Cephalotus-01.04.2015other%20side_zpsk3o

 

 

In the middle of the link above you can see his colour now. Much more green colours to be seen. the pair of the two old pitchers can be spotted on most pictures the first show only one because the other one is behind a new pitcher and the last picture shows none they are on the opposite side. They are nearly closed and very dark especially at the lid.

Edited by partisangardener

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder what age pitchers may reach?

What is the maximum age you experienced?

 

Followed your link above to the Ontario forum,  I found your thread without single answer, so here is my  -  it much depends from the clone, its age, its genes, under what conditions it is growing etc. Under my conditions some pitchers lasted from 2 months up to 2.5 years and more. . .  

 

 

I think this colour costs the plant certainly something, 

 

What exactly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To build up the anthocyanins and of course the red part of light it reflects can’t be used by the plant. In plenty light this will not make much difference but red equals normally with plants a slower growth rate compared to green varieties.

That might be the reason for bigger pitchers with a little shading.

On the other hand red might attract more insects which I doubt with Cephalotus (Ants usually don’t go for colors)

but might be  the case with other carnivores.

Edited by partisangardener

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cephalotus "Eden Black x Eden Black Bananito" clone, abundant nectar around the peristome in the morning.

 

PC020029_zpspsddplut.jpg

 

PC020036_zpsuvqyaaol.jpg

 

The nectar gently disappears in the afternoone and back again in the morning...

 

PC020004_zpsrdwtmy4c.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Everyone,

 

I grow my cephs in a cold frame on my balcony in the centre of Amsterdam.

They receive filtered sunlight and are protected from rain, I keep them moist in winter (not with 'feet' in the water).

The only protection they get from frost is the cold frame and an electric heating cable which I turn on manually when frost is expected.

The lowest they've had to put up with so far is just above freezing (+1 degree C.)

 

Dudley Watts (Which has it's first adult pitcher):

 

gallery_9149_1027_426084.png

 

 

Hummer's giant:

 

gallery_9149_1027_916018.png

 

 

Eden Black (no comment)

 

gallery_9149_1027_559421.png

 

 

Big Boy:

 

gallery_9149_1027_914998.png

 

 

Adrian Slack (which indeed lives up to it's character and relatively stays greener)

 

gallery_9149_1027_872865.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seed grown Cephalotus Northcliffe (Sand site) another one with good potential.

 

PC050044_zpsznhgqqqx.jpg

 

Unknown and unlabeled but shows very nice color and fat pitchers. ID? if anyone knows is welcome,  Received it 3 years ago as very small gift plant from German grower.

 

PC050057_zpsvmwutfr6.jpg

 

C.'Hummer's Giant'

 

12241610_936512699719637_277236849005228

 

11046495_936512696386304_327516265000106

 

11202060_936512693052971_511698562610515

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this