Sign in to follow this  
Shoultsy11

Respect the wind with a weak greenhouse

Recommended Posts

Disaster! My greenhouse has been flattened by the recent storm. f5cadf2f49d5d63e63c7480d6ae72d3f.jpg It's even moved a foot! 213bfeba267a5dae01946c30a0fcbf3b.jpg7d8f9dcf23e144bef26586b0d33f8458.jpgf8cb61a97f2bcb8268db4a07330079eb.jpg

This one could barely stand being touched let alone being in a 45mph wind!

Luckily my stronger greenhouse, used in the summer for tomatoes, has survived and they have been temporally stored there. But the other greenhouse may be beyond repair I suppose the stronger greenhouse will be their new home.

Edited by Shoultsy11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

its not beyond repair.Two of you can move it back to its original position.

A few wooden stakes hammered into the inside corners and screwed to the main structure will sort it.Then you could use silicone sealant to refix  the poly carbon sheets in position.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a panel on mine was blown out last night i've managed to get it back in for now. but like ada says i'm going to seal them all in when weathers a bit dryer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found part of my new build over in the neighbours garden the other morning.

I have all sorts of g clamps holding everything together at the moment.

There's been some pretty harsh wind down here in the south east too, my neighbours shed roof is currently in pieces.

No plant damage so far but every morning I dread the first glimpse down the garden..

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well the storm did this near me!

 

IMG_20151121_131607302_zps1otfjpjz.jpg

Edited by Shoultsy11

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

its not beyond repair.Two of you can move it back to its original position.

A few wooden stakes hammered into the inside corners and screwed to the main structure will sort it.Then you could use silicone sealant to refix  the poly carbon sheets in position.

Well I might not bother fixing it when I can use a better greenhouse. Anyway this one was free.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Glass weighs everything down. Yes, strong winds can blow panes out, but you have a lot less chance of the frame being shifted when you have more weight bearing down

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've fixed the Base down by screwing it into the concrete slabs it sits on. Kept all windows and doors shut in strong winds and so far no damage.

Sent from my SM-A300FU using Tapatalk

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I live a couple of miles from one of the windiest place in Britian,High Bradfield,check it out for wind speeds.

My greenhouse is fine. You have to expect wind so you make sure everything is bolted down.

 

Sadly it seems the younger generation is a throw away generation,that greenhouse is easily repairable with a little time and effort.

Just because it was free,it doesn't mean its not as good for growing plants in.

 

Show a bit of interest in repairing it and it could repay you in the long run.Think about it!

 

ada

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I live a couple of miles from one of the windiest place in Britian,High Bradfield,check it out for wind speeds.

My greenhouse is fine. You have to expect wind so you make sure everything is bolted down.

 

Sadly it seems the younger generation is a throw away generation,that greenhouse is easily repairable with a little time and effort.

Just because it was free,it doesn't mean its not as good for growing plants in.

 

Show a bit of interest in repairing it and it could repay you in the long run.Think about it!

 

ada

I might repair it, but with glass instead of cheap, weak acrylic

Sent from my XT1021 using Tapatalk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Forget cheap nasty aluminium greenhouses, save up some money and buy a decent wooden frame one, do a proper concrete base and bolt it down. It will last for 40 years or more and theyre not in reality very expensive.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And the advantages of an expensive wooden framed bolted down greenhouse over a medium priced aluminium framed bolted down greenhouse are what exactly? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Insulation would be an advantage of wood over aluminium, but only if your planning on heating it and using polycarb/ double glazing or something similar, is there a huge difference in price? Bet there is , strange when you see the price of aluminium

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And the advantages of an expensive wooden framed bolted down greenhouse over a medium priced aluminium framed bolted down greenhouse are what exactly?

The price is not very much different, in fact wooden greenhoses are often cheaper than good quality aluminium ones of the same size, the insulation is far better, and some studies have shown that many plants grow better in wooden vs. aluminium framed greenhouses, although the reason for that is not clear, less draughts maybe.

Secondly, the glazing tends to held in much stronger in the wooden frames, in aluminium greenhouses the glazing can often be sucked out in some wind conditions as its held in by simple glazing clips.

Edited by manders

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

still well out of the price range of a 12 year old,even with christmas coming

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Secondly, the glazing tends to held in much stronger in the wooden frames, in aluminium greenhouses the glazing can often be sucked out in some wind conditions as its held in by simple glazing clips.

 

Does that mean we should be sourcing well educated glazing clips?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The problem is not your frame it's you not having enough clips in the polycarb.This happened to my two greenhouse's about three years ago till I put more clips in the polycarb and I have not lost a panel since. But polycarb is not that good for our great British whether.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't wooden greenhouses let less light in because the slats are wider? They cast more shadows inside?

 

I've been told white powder coated aluminium is best for light transmission.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this