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Pete Bog

Ping problems

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Hi

 

Would welcome some growing advice on what I might be doing wrong here, the photo's are P.Moranensis.alba and P.Cyclosecta (the tray of Cyclosecta was full now only two remain)  I'm also having similar issue with P. laueana (bought several now and all have died). The healthy plants are P.Colimensis x Agnata grown in the same position and are currently flowering their socks off (just as proof I'm not a complete muppet - I hope :)  )

 

They start off ok, put on good growth then stop, the outer leaves die off and go brown and the inner section stops growing. Gradually it all dies back towards the center and I'm left with a little brown dead clump of leaves and root easily removed from the compost.

 

I'm growing on a East windowsill, they get some sunshine early morning but not too strong, in a gritty moss peat compost, the Cyclo's have Perlite. I've tried (over the years) growing damp, growing on the dry side, watering from below and watering from above, even adding crushed eggshell to the mix but never manage to keep them for more than part of a season.

 

What am I doing wrong? I've been growing CP's for 20years or more (pitchers and vft's) but these particular varieties have me beat.

 

thanks

 

Bob

 

 

7Fjz9AYb.jpg

 

Healthy Colimensis

 

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P.Cyclosecta

 

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P.Moranensis

 

 

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Hi Bob, I haven't tried growing P. colimensis but my Mexicans including P moranensis generally just sit there in the greenhouse quietly growing and flowering without any drama.  You say they are on an East facing windowsill and the conditions you describe sound OK, the only slight worry I'd have is could there be a radiator under the windowsill?  Like I said mine are all in the greenhouse these days but when I tried keeping a few indoors I found that the ambient humidity was just too low for them to thrive due to central heating etc. and their conditions declined although not in quite such a dramatic fashion as it seems yours are doing.

 

Do you have any photos of the general environment they are kept in and perhaps some larger ones of the plants as it a little difficult to tell much from the thumbnails you posted. Also you mentioned you tried keeping them dry and moist in the past without success but what type of water are you using, rain, tap?  Have you been fertilising?  I don't and I always water from below with rain water, they just stand in a tray with about 1-2cm water until that dries up then add some more.

 

My money would be on the (lack of) humidity on the windowsill but with a bit more info maybe we can identify some other problem.

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Hi Gaz

Yes there is a rad under the sill but with the mild weather it is hardly ever on, maybe an hour first thing in the morning.

I'm using rainwater, I haven't tried them in the greenhouse as I thought the strong sunlight would scorch them, I have no shading as the pitchers, vft's and Drosera  are all in there.
 

Have attached a couple of photo's I don't know why the first came out as thumbnails, but should mention I have tried in the past growing in the porch, in another unheated room, in the kitchen with similar results.

 

Always use rainwater and no fertiliser.

 

oGpyNfh.jpg

 

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7Fjz9AY.jpg

 

xGw0faT.jpg

 

ZJw3tHf.jpg

 

Regards

 

Bob

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I Agree with Tommy, nice collection.  I'm still leaning towards low humidity.  The compost in your Ping trays looks a bit on the dry side IMHO, if you stick your finger on the compost does it feel moist?  You could try covering them or simply put in a seed/gravel tray with propagator lid on.  Just out of interest do the leaves on your D. binata have dew on 'em? Do you have a hygrometer you could get a humidity reading off?

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I Agree with Tommy, nice collection.  I'm still leaning towards low humidity.  The compost in your Ping trays looks a bit on the dry side IMHO, if you stick your finger on the compost does it feel moist?  You could try covering them or simply put in a seed/gravel tray with propagator lid on.  Just out of interest do the leaves on your D. binata have dew on 'em? Do you have a hygrometer you could get a humidity reading off?

 

@Gaz The top grit is dry, but underneath it is moist, the D.Binata was moved in from the greenhouse as it has some baby vft seedlings in the pot, the Drosera was self seeded (seems to invade everything) it was already tatty but true there isn't much dew on it. I put a temp Hygro next to them last night, temp first thing this morning was 19.5 and 60% humidity.

 

@tommy I had brown heart disease when I first tried pings in the Greenhouse, but they were in the same tray as my Sarra's so I think that was too much water. But they died from the middle outwards, whereas the problem I'm having seems to be going from the outside towards the center. Shame, it had some lovely white flowers last year and I'm always a bit envious when I see the bright red laueana flowers in other peoples collections.

 

I'll try again next year :)

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D. binata does tend to popup all over the place and mine are dying back now also so certainly less dew there. Some of my Pings are starting to grow their winter succulent leaves now, although not my P. moranensis or P. cyclosecta. As all my Pings are in the greenhouse humidity is over 90% right now.  I know what you mean about those lovely red laueana flowers, I'm still waiting for mine to have some too.

 

As you're desperate to not lose the remaining plants (and have 2 cyclosectas), you could separate them and keep one indoors and the other in the GH (might need a bit of heat) or else try my previous suggestion of putting a lid or propagator cover over, or make a terrarium, to raise the humidity and see how it goes, you don't have too much to lose by trying.

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I find perlite in the mix often dominates the surface and creates a relatively dry surface. My plants sometimes do what yours do right next to plants that are fine. The surface moisture conditions are very important as most plants have very little in the way of roots. I prefer a bit more organic material in the mix to promote this when growing on windowsills which have relatively little humidity.

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The Brown heart disease is due to Fusarium fungus that entrance Pinguicula via bites on roots done by Nematodes.

Strong roots limited the bites and then Brown heart disease.

A more balanced growing media with minerals (like calcium and Magnesium) led to healthier plants with stronger roots. Also think in using Trichoderma (T. harzanium) that is a real allied against Fusarium.

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