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Zlotka

Growing on Rocks

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Hello,

 

I was wondering on what types of rock people are managed to grow Pinguiculas. I have seen people grow them succesfully on tufa and other types of lava, but I was wondering if they could possibly grow on rocks like basalt,

 

Maybe if I have the space next year I will try some different types of rock, but it is going to take a while to see if it hurt the plants.

 

I am curious what your experiences are.

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Interesting topic for UK growers.  I know it's very popular in the US but they can get lava rock and tufa very easily.  I don't think they're as readily available in the UK. Although I have seen some in aquatics shops many years ago in Cornwall although here in Ireland I've seen none in the fifteen years I've lived here. *rolls eyes*  The rock needs to be porous though.

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Interesting topic for UK growers.  I know it's very popular in the US but they can get lava rock and tufa very easily.  I don't think they're as readily available in the UK. Although I have seen some in aquatics shops many years ago in Cornwall although here in Ireland I've seen none in the fifteen years I've lived here. *rolls eyes*  The rock needs to be porous though.

Here in Holland Í have bought some lava stone, it is porous but not that far you can put just some soil in and grow the plant. I had to drill a hole in to fit the plant in, but when it is in a tray of water, it kind of  soaks the water up. This far they seem to enjoy growing on them

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I haven't tried it but it sounds interesting, do you have any pictures of your setup?

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If you're on Facebook Apache Rose did a video of it a couple of weeks ago as she has loads of rock-Pings.

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I haven't tried it but it sounds interesting, do you have any pictures of your setup?

Will take some tomorrow.

 

Edit: took a picture:

2eowmdc.jpg

bigger plant on the rock is an Agnata, samller one Jaumavensis.

No. 1 is Debbertiana

No. 2 is Esseriana

No. 3 is Cyclosecta (bottom right corner)

No. 4 is more Jaumavensis

 

If you're on Facebook Apache Rose did a video of it a couple of weeks ago as she has loads of rock-Pings.

I saw the one of her grow stone, but grow stone isn't available most places.

 

I have been growing some of Dianne's pings on a house brick, seems porous enough.

Doesn't it have to much minerals in it?

Edited by Zlotka
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The photos below are of Pinguicula 'Tina', which I believe is P. agnata x P. zecheri (Mexican). The first two photos are of them growing on pieces of natural cork bark in rainwater - nothing else. The plantlets were first placed on the bark on 28th April this year and the photos were taken today.

The third picture below shows them in comparison with plants grown in pots of Levington multipurpose compost.

I originally intended to throw the plantlets away (too many) but decided at the last minute to set them up as I have as an experiment.

The main conclusions I've drawn are that this particular plant needs only a damp surface on which to grow and that it does so epiphitically.

ping1_2.jpg

ping3_2.jpg

ping6_2.jpg

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It's now just over 5 months since my last post above. I thought it might be of interest to show how the plants have fared now that one year has passed since they were first placed on the bark.

The photograph below was taken today and, as you can see, the plants on the bark have not multiplied but appear to have reverted back to the size they were when first placed there. The potted plant on multipurpose compost has formed two rosettes.

So, although the plants on the bark were deprived of a nutritional substrate, most have survived and appear to be ready to go again.

ping7.jpg
 

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Did somebody tried Ytong bricks  yet ? They are easy to cut and formed.

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It's now just over 5 months since my last post above. I thought it might be of interest to show how the plants have fared now that one year has passed since they were first placed on the bark.

The photograph below was taken today and, as you can see, the plants on the bark have not multiplied but appear to have reverted back to the size they were when first placed there. The potted plant on multipurpose compost has formed two rosettes.

So, although the plants on the bark were deprived of a nutritional substrate, most have survived and appear to be ready to go again.

ping7.jpg

 

where and how where they overwintered I'm curious as I have just obtained one

thank you

tatter

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Apologies for the 7 months delayed response - I missed your post. They were overwintered in an unheated lean-to greenhouse built against a south-facing wall.

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