Not again!


numpty
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A couple of years ago I had problems with my Sarracenia eating some of the geckos that live in the nooks and crannies on my patio. As for as I know there were no fatalities last year, but then just recently I noticed a couple more casualties.

I don't have a problem with invertebrates falling victim to my CPs, but I have a hard time knowing that they're (and I'm ) killing off lizards. I keep pet amphibians, which I'm attached to, and on a purely intuitive level I'd put lizards a notch or two above frogs on the EQ scale.

 

Smells terrible too.

Time to start stuffing the Sarracenias' mouths with cotton wool or something.

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Gecko (and feeding flies) inside Sarracenia alata

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Sarracenia leucophylla with recently deceased gecko

Edited by numpty
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That's such a shame.

Many cp fans also seem to have a fondness for reptiles/amphibians and the stranger beasts of this world.

I used to keep geckos amongst other lizards and I'm surprised they can't escape the plants, they can walk up glass and on ceilings so you'd think they could get themselves out.

There's even a few species that actually live in the centre of bromeliads or however it's spelt, they also fill with water too.

I guess you could block up the pitchers or make a net cover for your plants but it's not ideal I know.

I hope someone comes up with a solution .

R.I.P little geckos.......

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I used to keep geckos amongst other lizards and I'm surprised they can't escape the plants, they can walk up glass and on ceilings so you'd think they could get themselves out.

There's even a few species that actually live in the centre of bromeliads or however it's spelt, they also fill with water too.

 

I was also a bit surprised by that. Apparently their feet have so many tiny "bristles" that they're able to take advantage of the (usually miniscule) attraction between molecules, which allows them to cling to most surfaces. But for some reason they can't grip onto the inside of a pitcher. Maybe the covering of hair on the inside of a pitcher means the gecko's feet aren't able to contact enough surface area to take advantage of the molecular forces. Maybe something more subtle. Or more obvious.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi

 

could you use a net with small enough holes to prevent the gecko's entering but will allow the flies in?

 

Dennis

 

Yes, I could, but that would involve some DIY which I just don't have the time for at the moment. It would also make the patio a bit uglier, and I already struggle to justify the mess of plants to my other half. I wonder if netting might also cause a small amount of heat build-up as well ... that's something I want to prevent when temperatures in the sun are already in the high-50s. Finally, some of the baby geckos are tiny and might still get through netting.

 

That said, it's something I'll have to try to experiment with next year. Maybe also a large moat of water surrounding the plants!

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Well you get my commendation for finding a solution, albeit temporary....

I too find it distressing to find anything other than common flies in my plants, I doubt I'll ever have to deal with a lizard luckily.

I do rescue bees, moths and other beasts when I can but hover flies seem helpless to resist the sarras and some nights there can be an audible humm coming from the plants!.

Obviously your sarras won't catch any food now which isn't ideal, are the geckos nocturnal?, maybe the sponge could be removed during the day if the lizards aren't active.

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Oh dear, :shock:  I'm sorry for your loss. :cray:  You seem to be taking it much better than I would :wall3::ireful2: So sad to see such nice plants in that state, did everything else survive ?

 

Some Neps lost their growing points, but the main casualty was a tray of pots containing dormant Drosera tubers; upended all over the patio. Managed to find a couple of D. menziesii tubers, but with wind and rain lashing everything around I gave up searching pretty quickly, as you can imagine. Tubers look like grit at the best of times.

 

The Sarracenia will survive, and with any luck so will a few more of the geckos!

 

 

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Gutted for you mate.

As you're witnessing, nature can be cruel......

I've had a couple of seasons of my plants being outdoors and tried all manner of plant supports but nothing short of supporting each pitcher individually keeps them from snapping from wind and rain.

I'm currently constructing shelters ready for winter/next season but nothing that would have stood up to your typhoon!.

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  • 5 months later...

After recently trimming last season's pitchers I found the remains of yet more corpses. That made at least five geckos killed last year. So I've decided to cut my collection of Sarrs back and put the remaining plants in a bog planter surrounded by a moat of water. I'll see if it works, though the local geckos are pretty good at leaping ... if they really want to get to the plants they might still be able to reach them. At that point I might have to put the planter in the middle of a child's paddling pool or something.

 

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A short stick/straw in each developed pitcher will help the geckos getting out and stabilize the pitchers somewhat.. In case they don’t get enough food then, you could feed them with dead animals or just fertilize them. But I think they don’t need it. The oily substance on the inner surface will be the problem for the geckos.

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A short stick/straw in each developed pitcher will help the geckos getting out and stabilize the pitchers somewhat.. In case they don’t get enough food then, you could feed them with dead animals or just fertilize them. But I think they don’t need it. The oily substance on the inner surface will be the problem for the geckos.

 

A straw inside the pitchers ... good idea. I ended up plugging the mouths last year, but never thought about providing a ladder on the inside. I'll give it a go!

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 5 weeks later...

The other thing you could try is putting old fashioned hairnets over the pitchers. You know, the Ena Sharples type. They're cheap to buy and should just drape over easily, no DIY required.

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