Sign in to follow this  
Incursion

Is this a Ultricularia?

Recommended Posts

I'm extremely new to Ultricularia's.... and before I start nursing what could potentially be a weed... I'd like to know if this is one thats spontaeously grown. (If it helps I did get the original pinguicula featured in this picture from a carnivorous plant nursery so anything is possible.

 

Ultricularia experts out there, point me in the right direction please :)

 

august%202015%20001_zps1ikomyb9.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is a Utricularia.  It could be U. bisquamata or U. subulata.  Both are weeds in a collection if you don't want them.  Particularly U. subulata which often produces seed pods prolifically without even flowering.  Cunning little bugger.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for a quick reply, where it is at the moment I'm not too fussy over, but I do have other Utricularia's sprouting out of other pots which... although are unique to my collection, are kind of in the middle of some of my more presitguous plants. As long as they dont overgrow they seem to be happy growing together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can never really get rid of the invasive species of Utricularia anyway.  The only place where they really seam to cause damage is if one of the weedy ones seeds its way into one of your prized non-weedy Utrics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fair enough, thank you for the advice, I shall keep that in mind as my collection grows :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can see there only a moss, not even a single leaf of U. busquamata/subulata.

 

I don't remember its name, but I know it well. Later I can check my books and try to identify it more or less.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It´s definitely not an utric,it´s livermoss and if I where you I´d remove it a.s.a.p.which can very easily been done with forceps.

Livermosses quickly cover all smaller CP like utrics and genlisea and smother them.

Even if the moss grows just on the surface of the soil,not over another plant, it prevents that oxygen will reach the roots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It´s definitely not an utric,it´s livermoss and if I where you I´d remove it a.s.a.p.which can very easily been done with forceps.

Livermosses quickly cover all smaller CP like utrics and genlisea and smother them.

Even if the moss grows just on the surface of the soil,not over another plant, it prevents that oxygen will reach the roots.

It can overgrow some very tiny plants, that is true, but I haven't seen it causing any serious damage to any of them, except making them to compete for the light. But such observation I have with other mosses and very small plants.

 

I think that under the water roots will have less oxygen than with a layer of mosses on the soil. And yet we often even submerge some Genlisea and Utricularia without negative effects.

 

This moss is Riccardia sp. Maybe R. multifida, maybe some other, impossible to tell from a photo.

Edited by Cephalotus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could have sworn that I saw Utric leaves in there amongst the moss but it's very difficult to see the wood for the trees.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah ok doke well thank you for the input, I will see if I can gracefully remove it from my soil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It does look something like Metzgeria furcata the Forked Veilwort. The photo's not that sharp though

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It does look something like Metzgeria furcata the Forked Veilwort. The photo's not that sharp though

It is not a Metzgeria sp., which has a strong, easily visible, central "nerve". The one above does not have any and the photo does not have to be sharp to notice that. There was a time when I was very much interested in mosses and I still remember some more common ones from their look. Beside Metzgeria sp. is more like a mountain species, prefers colder ecosystems, wile Riccardia sp. is a lot more widespread and heat tolerant genus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The one above does not have any and the photo does not have to be sharp to notice that. 

At the age my eyes are at it does

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Beside Metzgeria sp. is more like a mountain species, prefers colder ecosystems, wile Riccardia sp. is a lot more widespread and heat tolerant genus.

While I will readily dismiss Metzgeria sp. due to the lack of a mid rib I'm afraid the rest of your reasoning citing temperatures is, I'm afraid, excuse the expression, hot air.  If you look at the distribution map for the species I mentioned you will see that it grows widely in the UK, including Lincolnshire which is not generally noted for its mountains

 

http://www.bbsfieldguide.org.uk/sites/default/files/pdfs/liverworts/Metzgeria_furcata.pdf

 

BTW I'd be tempted to weed the pot  ie remove the Pinguicula and keep the liverwort  :laugh2:

Edited by FredG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this