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Having started my Carnivorous Plant journey (some ten years ago) by growing a handful of plants outdoors (due to lack of a greenhouse at the time), I've now returned to displaying a few plants outside; in a couple of newly set up bogs...

 

A Darlingtonia haven on the left, and a mixed species bog on the right:

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The Darlingtonia are in a very watery/soupy mix of pure Sphagnum & rain water, and has a solar-powered airstone at the bottom to create a bit of oxygenation - in full sun the water really bubbles away!

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The Belfast sink bog, consists of S. × 'Maxima', S. purpurea venosa, S. × harperi, S. oreophila 'Purple Throat', Dionaea muscipula (seed grown myself), Dionaea muscipula 'Akai Ryu', Drosera capensis 'Alba', Pinguicula grandiflora & Utricularia dichotoma.

It is a sphagnum, peat & sand mix with a blanket of sphagnum on the surface.

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It will be interesting to see these progress over the year(s), especially the Belfast sink, which should fill in nicely with D. capensis seedlings, P. grandiflora gemmae and the spreading U. dichotoma (providing it doesn't completely die off during the winter!)

 

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Darlingtonia setup looks particularly interesting.

 

I'm sure the birds will really appreciate the moss in the other pot :wink:

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I'm sure the birds will really appreciate the moss in the other pot :wink:

ha, yeah will have to wait and see on that one whether they like dicing with death - there are many cats in the neighbourhood (including our two) so we rarely see birds in the garden anyway!

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Very nice. First time I've heard about oxygenating a darlingtonia. 

Edited by Maria

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Very nice. First time I've heard about oxygenating a darlingtonia. 

This is very specific to my setup and the fact I will be growing it practically as an emergent aquatic. Sure, I'll probably let the water level drop significantly periodically (and air exchange will occur lower down), but most of the time the rhizome and roots will be completely under water.

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I'm hugely inspired! I've been thinking about doing this, and your pictures convinced me.

How long have you had these two set up? I'm interested in how they survive the English weather

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They've not been set up long... just a week or so before those pictures in July.

Therefore I cannot comment on how they will fare during the harsher winter months of our British weather.

Incidentally I will be moving house soon so have to temporarily tear down these bogs to move them!

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They've not been set up long... just a week or so before those pictures in July.

Therefore I cannot comment on how they will fare during the harsher winter months of our British weather.

Incidentally I will be moving house soon so have to temporarily tear down these bogs to move them!

OK, please keep us posted. I would be interested to know how such things survive the English winters. I'm not doing anything now until the spring, but will be interested to hear how people's gardens fared before I proceed.

 

We went to London on Tuesday, and popped in to see my sister-in-law. They keep some sarras and VFTs outside the whole year, and have done for about three years. They are looking fine, so there's hope for me yet.

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I'll certainly post some updates once all set up again and next year, once out of winter.

Incidentally, when I first started collecting (some 10 years ago) I had no greenhouse and so all my plants were exposed to the elements on a simple growbench in the corner of my garden. I had Sarracenia, Drosera, Pinguicula and Dionaea all getting cold, frosted and even covered completely in snow. They did just fine and the worst issue was high winds with the taller Sarracenia.

Bear in mind though that I live in a coastal area in the southeast corner of the UK where winters are not too extreme.

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I'll certainly post some updates once all set up again and next year, once out of winter.

Incidentally, when I first started collecting (some 10 years ago) I had no greenhouse and so all my plants were exposed to the elements on a simple growbench in the corner of my garden. I had Sarracenia, Drosera, Pinguicula and Dionaea all getting cold, frosted and even covered completely in snow. They did just fine and the worst issue was high winds with the taller Sarracenia.

Bear in mind though that I live in a coastal area in the southeast corner of the UK where winters are not too extreme.

Well, for all Manchester's wet weather, we don't get such cold winters, with very little snow, so they should be OK.

Prolly leave them indoors for now, and plant some out in the spring. I have quite a few drosera cuttings that are showing new growth, so may use some of those.

Please keep us up to date. Thanks

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