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av8tor1

Effects of lighting on colour

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I've meant to ask previously Butch. Was that taken with those same LED lights on?

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That pink ceph is just eye catching Av8tor! Has the LED setup done the same with other cephs? or maybe other plants?

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Fred,

 

Yes, to look at the light its very pleasing to the eye. I would guess the CRI is relatively high.

The light reminds you of the older plant gro fluorescents that had a pinkish tint.

 

I suspect that much of the Red is beyond normal human perception.

 

JM,

 

I tried a ping with it and the colour wasnt unusual but the growth rate was very fast. Carl has the same light with a heliamphora and its color wasnt "unusual". I think he is about to try a ceph and see if he gets the same response.

 

The light itself is rather small, its not anything you can illuminate more than a specimen plant with.

 

bulb.jpgping.jpg

 

one month later

 

1month.jpg

 

temp.jpg

 

some observations and caveats....

 

The camera used to take the ping images seemed overly sensitive to the red leds, The substrate and dead plant material looked "normal" to the eye, not pink like in the images

 

The Cephalotus is a "Hummer's Giant" but a clone that turns very dark/blackish under normal lighting.

 

I believe it is from one of the plants Pokie used in her "which one is it?" threads

 

I dont know if its the extra red, the lack of blue, or the increased ratio of red to blue... nor do I know if it would make every Cephalotus that color. But after seeing what it did to this one, the light has found its home :-)

 

I have the light almost on top of the ceph btw, but it was some distance from the ping.

 

Butch

 

http://www.hortamericas.com/images/stories/cl-G-Flowering_Lamp-0111-lr-uk_LR.pdf

Edited by av8tor1

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I think that most of the coloring of the plant, especially red, is caused by red color in the light spectrum. This is based on my experience with my plants. The same plants had only high blue (10000K) tubes for years and the leaves did not color up at all (neps). Then after I switched to plant tubes which have more red, I got red on the leaves. 

 

Same goes for cephalotus. I had a 6500K LED spotlight (just a cold white LED) for a typical cephalotus so close to the plant it almost touched it and almost no red on the pitchers (although vigorous gowth). Later I upgraded the lights to LED fixtures which have blue, red and white and after a while I got very red pitchers and the light was farther away from the plant.

 

All of these plants are indoor, in a terrarium with lowland temps and humidity.

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Thanks for the reply Butch. I have used standard red/blue leds to get some plants overwinter in my cellar. With Cephalotus  the reds were certainly enhanced even at the low intensity I used.  Disa orchids wil turn a vivid green. These effects are still evident when the plant is brought out to natural daylight but very transient. The effect is gone in a couple of days to a week.

From your reply I wonder what that plant looks like in natural daylight,with the photo not enhanced by the red/far red light and just how transient that colouring is. Keep us informed, it's entertaining  :tu:.

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Very interesting AND random. It seems there is no 100% rule about how the light can affect the coloration.

 

Thanks for the answer av8tor, what's the name of the lamp?

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JM,

 

Its the "Philips GreenPower LED Flowering Lamp"

 

It comes in three variants (at least here in the states)

Mine (and Carl's) is the White/Far Red/ Deep Red version.

 

It was designed as a supplimental light to aid in flowering for greenhouse use.

It was not designed as a stand alone plant light (per a conversation with vendor)

 

Fred,

I have a rack with 5000k 92 CRI lighting, I'll endeavor to move it there for some pics

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Well I'm not convinced re the 'proper' LED combination.

 

Here are some sarracenia (photographed minutes ago (see fredG response in the background)) grown under a single (18W) 'warm white' LED. They were sown last November and seem to be doing just fine. I'm already getting a good idea of final colour/form.

 

sarseeds.jpg

 

The LED itself cost me $4.

 

'Warm' white tends toward the 'red' and 'cold' white tends toward the blue. All white LED's are made from red and blue. If you are worried about a particular point in the spectrum then by all means look at the manufacturer specification. Truth to be told ... I don't think the plants care that much.

Edited by Hud357

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JM,

 

Its the "Philips GreenPower LED Flowering Lamp"

 

It comes in three variants (at least here in the states)

Mine (and Carl's) is the White/Far Red/ Deep Red version.

 

It was designed as a supplimental light to aid in flowering for greenhouse use.

It was not designed as a stand alone plant light (per a conversation with vendor)

 

Fred,

I have a rack with 5000k 92 CRI lighting, I'll endeavor to move it there for some pics

Out of curiosity i just looked up the price of these bulbs and ended up spitting coffee all over my monitor :blink:

I guess i won't be putting a dozen of them in the greenhouse :laugh1:

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Out of curiosity i just looked up the price of these bulbs and ended up spitting coffee all over my monitor :blink:

I guess i won't be putting a dozen of them in the greenhouse :laugh1:

12 x 60 USD what's that for a wealthy english gentleman Tony? :laugh1:

Edited by JMHoff
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White LEDs are made of blue leds, not red. White LED = blue led with a filter.

Nope. White LEDs use uV LEDs, which excite a phosphorous layer to produce the white spectrum.

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Nope. White LEDs use uV LEDs, which excite a phosphorous layer to produce the white spectrum.

 

Well we are both right. Several sources confirm that it is blue or uv with a phosphorus to produce white light. http://www.photonstartechnology.com/learn/how_leds_produce_white_light Then there are the RGB method of course. I have only seen BLUE leds that produce white light. How, you may ask. Well I have some white leds and one of them had its phosphorus layer broken off. The result is a blue led (more like royal blue). No idea which method is more common but most of the sources just by googling say that it's blue.

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