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Pythium and Sarracenia


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I believe in the hydroponics world it may be known as bud rot .

I believe bud rot occurs when there is alot of RH% in the air and the leaf/pitcher cannot hold anymore water which them draws into the bud/ rhizome. Many fungeses can easily spread, i believe i clean work place as people stated above alomg with alot of air flow will help minimise this.

Dan

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It's a shame some people on here lately can't differentiate between which comments are suitable for general viewing and those which should be sent via PM.

Whatever has gone, people shouldn't be getting bad mouthed and bullied to the point of leaving.

It won't be much of a site with just a handful of deluded Prima Donna's opinions to fall back on...

Sad.

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Any plant bought from any buyer could potentially harbour something " extra" to what was desired.

99% of sellers aren't going to go to the trouble of having regular testing done so where now?

I buy from all manner of sources so am I to set up some sort of quarantine station in the garden ?.

I could never condone anyone selling a knowingly sick/ infected plant but there's nowhere you can buy from that will guarantee otherwise unless you're willing to buy " in vitro " plants.....

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Guest GazCez

Please everyone stop it ! Plants get diseases and we cannot stop them. We sell plants in good faith and do not willing spread infections. We need to learn not bicker. You could do every preventative measure and you can and still get problems.

 

I pleaded for scientific discussion but now it's turned even more nasty. Please don't do it. Do what Ady and I did and get it sorted out. You may never agree but just beg to differ and be done with it all.

 

Contact one another and make friends again - please. :kiss3:

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Just a quick question for Ady. Obviously people have offered up advice based on the symptoms your plants have exhibited and you have excepted this advice in good faith but are you absolutely sure that they have been affected by a pythium outbreak ? I suppose my question is can it be determined categorically that this is the cause ? If not you may be treating your plants for something they don't have.

Dave

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Interesting comment on fertilising speeding up the process.....

http://www.carnivorousplants.org/howto/OtherIssues/SarraceniaRhizomeRot.php

I have had a couple of rhizomes that looked like in the photo's after winter, I just put it down to the plant not being tough enough for the temps but who knows?.

Seems you should "quarantine" your new purchases, I guess it makes sense in some way but tricky to get a decent space between new and old if you got limited garden space.....

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Just a quick question for Ady. Obviously people have offered up advice based on the symptoms your plants have exhibited and you have excepted this advice in good faith but are you absolutely sure that they have been affected by a pythium outbreak ? I suppose my question is can it be determined categorically that this is the cause ? If not you may be treating your plants for something they don't have.

Dave

Hi Dave

I have accepted the advice given by - to date - 3 well known commercial growers. They all say the same, its Pythium. Annoyingly at the minute, I cannot treat them with the new treatment I've ordered as its still not here. I have looked at the roots of some of the affected plants, and can see nothing alarming down there. Its getting to the point now where Im simply thinking of "binning" the lot and completely starting again. That way I can clear out the capillary matting from the benches, scrub absolutely everything down and hopefully eradicate whatever it is thats going through my collection like a dose of salts. Every day I'm finding more and more plants affected by it, today I have moved another 20 or so plants. It started off throught the Alatas, but now it seems to be spreading along the bench and has now reached the Leucophylla. Very fed up an the moment as I built up a nice collection, and now it all seems to have been somewhat pointless. :(

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Sorry to hear that mate. I hope you manage to get it under control before it affects all your plants and you don't have to resort to drastic measures.

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Guest GazCez

After a few hours of trawling the internet and speaking to a hydroponics firm and a guy at Fera about the situation I am far more informed that I was.

 

I am asking Forum members if there is a possibility that the culprit might not be pythium and some other fungal attack such as fusarium wilt or verticillium wilt?

 

I am looking at how the plants have collapsed 3/4 of the way up the plant rather than from the base upwards. Would the fusarium tie in with this rather than the pythium?

 

Could there be any other culprits that we haven't examined? They all seem to fit in one way or the other including the good old seed growers nightmare of damping off.

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Here's a plant of mine which is affected by this mystery pathogen. Could this be Pythium? I have no idea.  You can see that one of the flowers wilted off before opening and there are a few pitchers that have gone tits down. Sorry for the large image size but I figure people will want to be able to look up close.

 

18422125452_20d5312f04_h.jpgIMG_3310 by Richard Bunn, on Flickr

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Here's a plant of mine which is affected by this mystery pathogen. Could this be Pythium? I have no idea.  You can see that one of the flowers wilted off before opening and there are a few pitchers that have gone tits down. Sorry for the large image size but I figure people will want to be able to look up close.

 

18422125452_20d5312f04_h.jpgIMG_3310 by Richard Bunn, on Flickr

Hi Richard,

It could be. Have a look to see if any of the neighbouring pitchers have any dying of patches or spots forming. This can be a 1 to a few inches above the crown if it is the case.

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Ady, you have capillary matting down for which plants?

its in all benches - left there since winter

 

Ady, you have capillary matting down for which plants?

yes its in all the benches so all the plants are on it. Sarras VFT etc etc. Left it there since winter.

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As part of the eradication of Pithium and other unwanted problems, some of you know I am trialling a peat free mix and the few plants I had with this problem are now grown in this:

http://www.melcourt.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Melcourt-Hortibark-Pine.pdf

Since using this, all symptoms have disappeared completely. The plants were quarantined as soon as symptoms appeared.

Edited by Mike King
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Very interesting post Mike and I'm so pleased that you finally used that very important word QUARANTINE.  Pythium is an entire genus and from what you are saying the species you had problems with is not the 'root rot' species that is reported in the US.

This is also encouraging in that it appears to attack only the young pitchers which are much more accessible for problem identification and removal. Eradication then becomes an achievable goal.

 

ADY have you sent samples for testing yet?

Edited by FredG
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I have today contacted the Plant Health Team at DEFRA, and they have requested photographs of the affected plants. They will contact me if they require plant material / soil samples etc.

Edited by Carnivine
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Mike, thank you for the information about the hortibark, it's very interesting if this goes some way to controlling the pathogen.

 

As far as I'm aware (please correct me on this if I've made a mistake!) pythium species are usually controlled by blighticides, has anyone heard of these being used with Sarracenia? As far as I can gather they are often sold as soil drenches (such as copper oxides, metalaxyl and fosetyl aluminium in the control of P. infestans) but apparently are also available as foliar sprays, though I have no idea what's commonly available. I would however be very wary of letting copper salts leech into the soil for carnivorous plants.

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