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HELP - Sarracenia problem.


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Blimey, just been down the greenhouse and noticed a load of Sarracenia (at both ends of the greenhouse) have got pitchers that have bent over double, with the top pointing towards the ground. Some are pitchers that have opened, whilst others are new pitchers yet to open properly. On some of them, the ends / top of the pitchers have started to go brown and die back.

 

Never had this before so its a mystery whats happening. The benches, although damp, didnt have any water in them for a day this week, although I would be surprised if this is the cause as the soil in the pots would still have been wet. Not sure if it could be temperature too high / lack of air movement etc etc.

 

Any ideas anyone?

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Have they straightened up now?,i'm guessing you've filled the water trays up.I have had one or two do this occasionally in very hot(in the greenhouse)and windy conditions.They were fine later with more water.

If not it could be this fungus that Mike was on about,it loves warm humid conditions,that's why i leave the door and windows open for good air circulation.

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Adrian, i think Mike commented on FB about some one with it a few days ago.

if it is the fungus,cut off infected parts,open up the greenhouse for more air circulation.maybe a fungicidal spray to kill any spores.ask Mike

ada

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I've had this happen before. If the sun comes out and the greenhouse jumps in temperature, the roots really need to be sitting in water to suck up the water quickly. Wet soil doesn't cut it. It only seems to affect new soft pitchers - older ones don't seem affected.

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Thanks chaps. Having spoken to Mike King, it appears it is Pithium Fungus. Apparently there are no off the shelf fungicides that can treat it. I can leave the plants outside for a year then over winter completely remove all foliage and soil, scrubbing all parts clean, then re-pot and start again. However, that may not guarantee getting rid of it all. The other option is to destroy the plants and sterilize the pots.

 

Having got almost 500 plants - I have taken the second option - 24 plants gon

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I'd never even heard of this before now although I have had plenty of seeds " die" due to damp off which I now read is this pithium thing....

The article I just read said greenhouses reaching over 28c in the day and under 20c at night are this fungus's optimum conditions....

I doubt there's many growers that can protect against that.

No real remedy and spread via the feet of fungus gnats, flies, contaminated water/ soil....

It did say poorly kept plants were more susceptible than plants kept in optimum conditions.

I'm pretty sure your collection is just as well cared for as any other growers here Carnivine.

It's a worrying thought people's whole collections could be at risk.

I'm gutted for you Carnivine and am now concerned about something that I'd never really considered.

I hope you manage to get on top of this.

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I think its a bit drastic getting rid of them.I would have cut off the affected pitchers and left them out side.Then the plants might be more resistant!

Just out of interest,were there any particular plants affected? eg alatas,minors? or was it just random? was it species and hybrids? just thinking some plants might be more resistant with hybrid vigour etc.also some plants are weaker growers than others and never seem to do really well,were these affected?

This might help build up a better info base for growers,just as a note i wouldn't say my greenhouse is clean by any means,we read that kids don't build up immunity because they don't play out and get dirty nowerdays.

i let my trays dry out between waterings but not at this time of year,now they are always full,when plants are growing about half an inch a day they need water constantly.Ventilation might make the greenhouse cooler and plants smaller but it wont kill them.

Ady,any info would be good on your losses,pm me if you like.

ada

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Very odd that you need to dispose of plants from a fungus that most people didn't even know existed or if they did would be a threat to adult plants.I'd be more inclined to believe they suffered dehydration due to high temperature and water not available in sufficient quantity It's a bad time of year to let trays go dry even if the medium is still moist

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The plants affected are random. Alatas, Flavas, Psittacina etc etc. I have not yet destroyed them but they are outside in the garden. Some a huge plants so throwing away is proving difficult - if they were smaller I wouldnt  mind so much.

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Very odd that you need to dispose of plants from a fungus that most people didn't even know existed or if they did would be a threat to adult plants.I'd be more inclined to believe they suffered dehydration due to high temperature and water not available in sufficient quantity It's a bad time of year to let trays go dry even if the medium is still moist

The only plants affected were the ones purchased off a grower on here, and plants immediately around them. There were several Sarracenia which I put at various positions in the benching (IE Alats at the Alata end, Flavas with the Flavas etc etc.) This is why it makes sense that the plants affected are the new ones I brought. My plants that are nowhere near the new plants are (currently) unaffected.

 

Is it a serious likelihood that lack of water for one day could cause this sort of growth problem??

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As Alexis says photos would help,but no water and the heat of a greenhouse thats closed up could cause stress to new plants.But if they are large they are o.k i would have said,so you could have unwittingly brought the trouble in,did you pot them as bare rooted plants?? or buy them potted??

I thought this was a problem that hits plants later in the season,Blocky 71 do you have a link to your reference on it?

ada

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We recently had a discussion on another forum about fungus affecting Sarracenia, and someone linked these posts referring to Darlingtonia. They're quite an interesting read.

http://sarracenia.proboards.com/thread/ ... ter?page=1
http://sarracenia.proboards.com/thread/ ... ot-disease

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And this, I know it's on a different plant but guessing same applies...

http://www.apsnet.org/edcenter/intropp/lessons/fungi/Oomycetes/Pages/PythiumBlight.aspx

I've gotta agree that immedeately disposing of the plants is a bit harsh, if a fungal attack was proven I'd be tempted to separate the plants affected and give a dose or two of copper oxychloride and monitor....

Have you contacted the seller to see if they've got any issues?

Cheers Blocky

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Cheers Blocky71,

an interesting read,gave me several thinks to think about.

i.e root temperature and small seedlings.I have found that they grow better on the floor where they are cooler.

and where the fungus can invade the roots and restricts nutrient uptake,i wonder if this is why some clones don't grow to their best in some growers conditions,it doesn't kill them but does stunt them.ie they have less tolerence.

ada

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An eye opener indeed....

Especially interesting to read about the devastation it can wreak in hydroponic set ups as I was considering giving that a go.

I have a mate who is really into hydroponics, more so what it produces!, I'll ask him if he or anyone in his " community " has had any dealings.....

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This is beginning to remind me of what happens if you let people read a Medical Dictionary if they have a headache.

Edited by FredG
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As is said in the medical profession, common things are common. It's good to know about this fungus but unless it's proven then the most likely explanation is what has been given en masse.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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