Niall FM

Producing plantlets of VFT and drosera via water immersion technique

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I have a love of science and as a result have been testing multiple methods of leaf pullings on Dionaea for some time now, this is a log of my testing method, results and conclusions.

 

Introduction:

I'm a student so cutting costs is one of my top priorities when taking cuttings, as a result all of my experiment was preformed using items that can be found in the common household(excluding a full spectrum CFL and a VFT:-P) as a result no chemical additives were used eg. Rooting hormones, anti-fungal powders .etc.  

  • All experiments were preformed over a three month period
  • During said period progress was recorded at 1 month intervals
  • Each factor/method was preformed with three leaves
  • Once the traps turned fully black (in all methods) they were removed to prevent fungal growth

 

 

Taking pullings:

  • Pullings were taken early February from a plant which was bought fresh fresh out of dormancy
  • Pullings were taken by un-potting the VFT and "pulling" downwards on the leaves so a section of the rhizome came away each time
  • All pullings were taken from the same two plants
  • All chosen leaves were of the same size and health

 

Procedure:

 

Method 1: Pullings placed on Peat Moss

  1. The leaf Pullings were placed in dents on the surface of a pot of boiled peat moss(dent used to make the most possible surface area of the underside of the leaves be in contact with the peat moss, boiled in an attempt to kill off fungus spores and bacteria)
  2. The pots were placed in a tray of Rainwater approximately 30cm away from a CFL
  3. Each pot was covered in cling film

 

Method 2: Pullings placed in Long fibre Sphagnum (LFS)

  1. The leaf Pullings were placed in on the surface of the boiled LFS with as much of the underside of the leaves in contact with the LFS as possible
  2. The pots were placed in a tray of Rainwater approximately 30cm away from a CFL
  3. Each pot was covered in cling film

 

Method 3: Pullings placed submerged in Rainwater

  1. The leaf pullings were placed in glasses of boiled(then cooled) rainwater (boiled in this case in an attempt to kill bacteria and algal spores)
  2. The glasses were placed approximately 30cm away from a CFL 
  3. Each glass was covered with cling film

 

 

Results:

 

Method 1: Pullings placed on Peat Moss

  • This method resulted in the shortest amount of time before fungal growth was seen(at the 1 month interval)
  • No successful strikes were seen before all pots were consumed by fungus(possibly due to cling film causing stagnant air which sped up spore germination)
  • Method abandoned at 2 month mark when all leaves were noted to be dead
  • Not a method I've had "lots" of success with in the past as well

 

Method 2: Pullings placed in Long fibre Sphagnum (LFS)

  • Method shows promise as 2/3 had strikes 
  • Fungal growth occurred only after 2 month mark
  • Between month 2 and 3 two leaves were killed by fungus(one with a strike and one without)
  • By the end of month 3 the remaining leaf had formed a plantlet

 

 
Method 3: Pullings placed submerged in Rainwater
  • By far most successful
  • No maintenance required (ie. no topping up water) apart from removing dead traps
  • %100 strike rate
  • No fungus seen(due to submersion) 
  • Small amount of algae seen during month 1 but it was left alone

 

 

Conclusion:

 

After preforming all three variations of leaf pulling I found the most successful to be the technique of placing pullings in rainwater. The LFS strike that did survive had grown larger then all of the plantlets from the Submerged method, but a conclusion on size of plantlet can not be drawn as this could be an isolated case.

From my own opinion the submersion method is also the easiest, no potting or watering, just stick it in a glass of boiled and cooled rainwater(not to mention it's the cheapest)

 

 

Method of acclimatising Submerged plants to emmersed(yes it's a real word) state

  • After plantlet has reached approx 1cm in diameter remove it from the glass and place it on LFS or peat (very wet) in a pot with cling film over the top
  • Over the course of a 2-3 weeks pop holes in the cling film 
  • At the end of the three weeks you have air-hardy little plantlets

 

After Notes:

Two weeks on from the end of the experiment all 4 of the successful strikes have formed plantlets with small traps, the ones from the submersion technique seemed to take a week off of growing to acclimatise. I would like to see how long one on the plantlets could be left in water before being acclimatised as growth was much faster pre acclimatisation, buts that's a whole other experiment for a different time.

 

I hope my long rambling report can help someone in some way eventually. 

   -  Niall FM

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Thanks for posting your findings... always good to hear the results of grower's mini-experiments.

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an interesting experiment but I dont think you used the best method for growing leaf pullings in a substrate.

Covering with clingfilm is not in my opinion the best method for growing leaf pullings. Ive found that air circulation is important to minimise fungal growth and that humidity levels are sufficient without sealing in plastic as the leaf pullings are down at substrate levels and in the case of sphagnum moss almost completely surrounded by it.

 

were the two plants used genetically identical?

How many leaf pullings did you use for each test condition. I would say at least ten would be needed for an accurate result.

 

However, its great that growers are trying these experiments as there is always things to be learned from them

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Really interesting, I've never tried personally the water method but I should give it a try.

 

Does it work with all kinds of CPs?

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Sir you had by curiosity, but now you have my attention. Did you happen to take any pictures during all of this?

I'm afraid it never even crossed my mind to do so but I will add some to this thread asap.

 

an interesting experiment but I dont think you used the best method for growing leaf pullings in a substrate.

Covering with clingfilm is not in my opinion the best method for growing leaf pullings. Ive found that air circulation is important to minimise fungal growth and that humidity levels are sufficient without sealing in plastic as the leaf pullings are down at substrate levels and in the case of sphagnum moss almost completely surrounded by it.

 

were the two plants used genetically identical?

How many leaf pullings did you use for each test condition. I would say at least ten would be needed for an accurate result.

 

However, its great that growers are trying these experiments as there is always things to be learned from them

I have since had success with no clingfilm but I do not believe it is due to there being high humidity at substrate level, but more so a constant wicking action of the surfaces in contact from pulling and the chosen substrate, I think this is so because if you consider why would a pulling be able to strike underwater? It just makes sense that it'd be an adaptation of a film of water wicked from the ground. Any humidity built up above the substrate would surely be blown away with any air movement.

They were from a commercial dealer who's website says that they use Tissue Culture to produce all of their plants, so more than likely genetically identical.

 

Really interesting, I've never tried personally the water method but I should give it a try.

 

Does it work with all kinds of CPs?

I've only tried on normal form and a few wacky traps.

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Wow, excellent stuff!

 

I'm quite new with CPs, but am very interested in cultivating them, partly because I'm on a low income and can;t afford to buy more! Plus, it's always satisfying to "do it yourself."

 

I had been wondering about how best to do it. Your results have encouraged me to try out submerging the cuttings.

 

Thanks again. Please keep us updated, and post some pictures if you can.

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Nial,

 

Indeed a very interesting thread. like others it also took my interest. I am also a new convert to carnivorous plants and am tentatively starting to grow/create/develop my own plantlets. more out of curiosity and fun than anything else. I have also started with Dionea as they do seem to be the 'easiest' I have used a similar method to your method 3

1 bottle of RO water from Halfords £2, test tubes off ebay £3 and a few leaf cuttings £free.

sat them in a nice warm, bright location (window ledge at work)

 

apart from being able to observe any progress also gave an interesting topic of conversation at quiet times....

 

both vft cuttings have struck and after 2-3 months are producing 3-4 tiny leaves but with recognisable traps (still closed).

Drosera Rotundifolia all 5 leaves have struck and have plantlets on them

Drosera Filiformis I only used one stem and this is also producing growth.

 

all in all seems a fairly successful method. only now to make the transition from tube to pot to plant. . . . .

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OK, so I'm hooked!

 

Is there any reason to use test tubes? What's wrong with a glass of water? Also, do you close the top of the test tubes? If so, with what?

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yossu I only used test tubes as they were cheap, small and stood in a rack. Nice and neat and don't take up a lot of space. Caps on, Yes

 

Don't suppose glass jam jar, coffee jar etc.. would be any different (larger, yes). Just a space issue I suppose

 

the test tubes have a stopper, keeps air out and water in.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B008KYQLYW?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00

 

pic aint big nor easy to see but that was all I needed to get going. Warm, Sunny windowsill but not too much as to cook 'em. Then again, that prob wont be a problem in Manc :rainingsmile:
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This is my current water start set-up, it's just a test-tube perched in my terrarium

xmoILe.jpg

 

Gricey, I really like the idea of using distilled water, I imagine you would get no algae at all, very nice!

 

To update what I'm doing:

I now just have a single test tube that I stick everything into, at the moment it has Capensis, VFT Dentate and VFT red dragon in it.

I was really impressed by this method due to it getting a leaf that was accidentally snapped in half to strike, it's just a little nub right now but it's definitely there!

 

Here's some pictures of the plantlets from my original experiment 5 months on:

aLDkSn.jpg

gAuVTN.jpg

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yossu I only used test tubes as they were cheap, small and stood in a rack. Nice and neat and don't take up a lot of space. Caps on, Yes

 

Don't suppose glass jam jar, coffee jar etc.. would be any different (larger, yes). Just a space issue I suppose

sorry for the delay in replying. Never got a notification, so only just noticed your reply.

Thanks for the update. At that price, I might try some. Having said that, we have plenty of jars around, so might not!

Either way, sounds like s great experiment.

Do you think you would have had the same success with cuttings that didn't go right down to the rhyzome? I'm a bit nervous at pulling my plants out of their pots (still new at this hobby), and would be happier just snipping off a leaf above ground.

Also, do you have any experience with propogating from a flower stem? A couple of my droseras have stems, whici I'm going to snip anyway as I want the plants to grow bigger. Can I put these in water and have them propogate?

 

Warm, Sunny windowsill but not too much as to cook 'em. Then again, that prob wont be a problem in Manc :rainingsmile:

Hey, watch what you're saying about our tropical (as in, wet as a tropical rain forsst, but without the sun!) weather! It hasn't rained all day!!

Thanks for the reply.

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1)   Do you think you would have had the same success with cuttings that didn't go right down to the rhyzome? I'm a bit nervous at pulling my plants out of their pots (still new at this hobby), and would be happier just snipping off a leaf above ground.

2) Also, do you have any experience with propogating from a flower stem? A couple of my droseras have stems, whici I'm going to snip anyway as I want the plants to grow bigger. Can I put these in water and have them propogate?

 

1) the Drosera in the test tubes, also some now in a glass coffee jar are just leaves from Drosera Rotundifolia. No stem or anything. a couple were accidental damage (may have been a bird at the moss) and were simply snipped off and put in the distilled water. There was no need at all for full leaf/rhizome cutting.

 

2) I haven't tried a flower stem from a Drosera but see no reason why it would not work the same way (as is done for VFT)

 

there is a Drosera Filiformis leaf in vitro as well. Again this is just a cut leaf, no disturbing the plant, no rhizome.

 

I am going to get an update with pics posted later.

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Have you experimented with temperatures like putting a tube on a seed heating mat vs one at room temp to see if it makes any difference?

Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk

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nope. very very new to even owning a garden and space never mind cultivating...

Its a thought though. maybe next time when I draw up a, now more knowledgeable, detailed plan, that could be in the mix. as the link above to the blog states I aint not no scientician :drag: just muckin around to see what I can do/learn.

 

above a radiator at work seemed to do a good enough job so far! but for those who have time, will but lack funds as I am sure is many, sometimes someone doing something for the hell of it, at low/minimal cost shows that you don't need fancy heated this, sterilised that, large the other. I am sure all that helps but as a base start owt will do. I am sure Mr Nesc**e didn't think his rotten coffee would see a good use for the jar!

:smile:

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That's great stuff gricey. You've encouraged me to get snipping! I'd love to get some little plants growing from snippings. Even better, I'd like to grow some BIG plants from them!

 

Thanks for the updates. Keep them coming.

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Hello, thank you very much for sharing this results ! I have heard of it for drosera but I didn't know it was possible for vft ! I will try it for sure!

Envoyé de mon GT-I9305 en utilisant Tapatalk

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Nial, when did you first put them in the water? Is it too late now?

 

Where in Ireland are you again? I think you told me before but I've a shocking memory for things.  

 

If you fancy a visit to my collection in East Cork you'd be more than welcome.  

 

I'm off to Trev's (vftshop.com) in Bantry on Wednesday, I'll take photos.

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Hi Richard,

I was on holidays for the last week and upon arriving home discovered a dislodged drain pipe and some crispy plantlets.

I began my first few in February, but I can not say for certain if it's too late in the year or not now, I was planning a test to see if the plantlets could survive their first year without dormancy (as this would mean pullings could be taken any time of the year) but due to "the accident" I can't and wont be able to tell you if their is a cut off date.

 

I live in Kildare, I look forward to seeing those photos :-)

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hello, Northern Cousin again chaps....

put mine in the Test Tube in RO water back in Mid March-Early April. Transplanted mid July and are sitting in a plastic container ready for lid off and see how they get on. Have updates in the blog section and will be updating next evening or so if this rain ever stops up here !

I only started at this time as that is when the notion came to me. I don't see why, given the conditions that they start in (i.e. in vitro so no climatic effects really) there should be any 'optimum' or 'correct' time to start them. as they are so young and small the important thing would be to get them to a size, acclimatised to the outside world. Once I/you/we get the little fellers to that point they should 'auto tune' to the seasons so I don't think one year no dormancy should cause too much stress. I may be totally off track and out of kilter but I reckon I'd know more in a few months!

 

VFT

1 has a good few traps and some root, must be about 1-2 Inches

1 has a few v small traps but is showing promising signs

 

D.Filliformis

small but emerging and lengthening resemblances of nice finger like leaves

 

D.Rotundifolia

small but multi leaved formations (I seem to be having real trouble with these up here)

 

size is no comparison to the vegetative ones from the same time but I didn't expect it to be and that is a different kettle of fish.

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Sad to report that my experiments so far weren't a great success. I took some snippings from a VFT and left them in deionised water, but they have gone black and mouldy.

 

I have some D.binata and D.capensis snippings that look OK, so there is still hope.

 

Also, I just received some test tubes, so am going to have another go. Spurred on by an idea mentioned here, I may put the test tubes in the fish or turtle tank, as that will keep them warmer than just sitting in the house. The turtle tank has a UV tube over it as well, so they should get some good light.

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