Best cutting propagation method


Richard Hole
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Hello

Do you know of anyone that has done some experiments to measure how much difference various cutting striking methods make for Nepenthes?

For example, some people claim that a particular slicing technique is better while someone else suggests something different. Some people suggest putting a split in the base of the stem while other people say to put slits in the outer layer of tissue. With a very sharp knife blade, I used to cut the petiole (at the base of the cutting) off where it joins the stem so the cut also removes the outer layer of tissue on the stem to expose the meristematic tissue. However, a friend who did some cuttings with me who knew a lot about it, suggested this was not necessary and he just used secateurs to cut the stem below the node without doing any other splicing. He also suggested dipping the cutting in water or rooting hormone as quickly as possible after cutting the stem to avoid air getting trapped in the base of the stem. Then he would wrap the stem in sphagnum and pot as soon as he took the cutting out of the water or hormone.

I have been dipping the cutting in a solution of wettable sulfur just before potting to stop fungi. However, other people do not recommend this. Also, some people recommend root hormone while other people say that it does not help.

I wonder if any of these techniques make much difference and if any tests have been done to compare the difference.  Do you know of any tests where a reasonable number of cuttings had one of these methods done and it was compared to a number of the same variety planted at the same time under the same conditions where the method was not done?
If not, do you know of anyone that could do this experiment? It would be worthwhile, as it could save a lot of time and expense in doing something that may not be necessary.

Regards Richard.

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I'm of the opinions that its "horses for courses", play around and find what works for you i guess. I've tried many techniques but for me nothing works better than a 45 degree cut and sticking it in some dead sphagnum for a few weeks bagged up in lots of light. I've never used rooting hormone mainly because I've never had issues rooting that would warrant me to try.

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Same here, i just cut the stem in some random way, they root more often than not.  Never used rooting hormones. I find some plants root easier than others, but most common species are very easy to root.  Very wet live spaghnum works well for me as a rooting medium (but not for growing).

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I'm surprised you didn't mention your horizontal method Mark ? I'm still determined to give this a go next chance i get as i believe it makes for a much nicer plant with roots directly below when it comes to repotting, instead of at a 90 degree angle from the new node growth point. Anyway, that's probably just my OCD kicking in again :laugh1:

 

Richard, I've had success (and failure) doing flat cuts, angled cuts, splitting the epidermis, not splitting the epidermis, dipping in Clonex, not dipping in Clonex, planted in peat, planted in sphagnum. I've used fungicide when potting up and sometimes i don't have any.

To be honest i don't think anyone is going to bother doing controlled tests on a large scale, as i believe the cutting itself will decide if it's going to succeed or fail, regardless of how it's prepared. Probably light, warmth, air circulation, and humidity are the most important factors to success ?

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I'm surprised you didn't mention your horizontal method Mark ? I'm still determined to give this a go next chance i get as i believe it makes for a much nicer plant with roots directly below when it comes to repotting, instead of at a 90 degree angle from the new node growth point. Anyway, that's probably just my OCD kicking in again :laugh1:

Well, ive only ever tried it once and it was with a 20 foot vine covered in side shoot buds, so i'm not sure how well it would work with a typical nep stem. :D Edited by manders
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  • 2 months later...

Hello

Have you used or heard of someone that used organic honey instead of root hormone for Nepenthes cuttings and if so, have you found that it either helps or does not do any harm?  I heard it is anti fungal and bacterial so if I used it, it would save me having to sterilize the knife or cutter blade. 

It would be worthwhile experimenting with it because it supposed to help with cuttings and many people use it as you can see at https://www.google.com.au/search?q=honey+hormone+cuttings&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&gfe_rd=cr&ei=ub9-VYXFCsKm8weW55q4Ag .  However, I have not read about it being used for Nepenthes cuttings.

If I do not use honey, root hormone or any fungicides would I have to sterilize the cutting blade or would just an occasional wash under the tap be all right?

Have you found secateurs or scissors to be just as good as a sharp knife as I heard that a clean cut is not essential?

Regards Richard.

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I found the cut not to be essential , I used a Stanley knife because I have one but would use scissors , then I removed the outer layer from the stem for about an inch as I saw someone else had had good success rates with that method but probably not necessary, I then left the cut end in clean water for 24 hours then into live sphagnum , no cleaning of blades apart from running under tap no hormones or fancy stuff, sphagnum seems to stop cuttings going bad

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Never tried nepenthes cuttings but have propagated alot of different house plants and garden plant, i have never steralized my knife/scissors etc and never had a propblem. There are many of rootin hormones available, i had alot of success with clonex which i purchased of ebay. Thanks

Dan

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I found the cut not to be essential , I used a Stanley knife because I have one but would use scissors , then I removed the outer layer from the stem for about an inch as I saw someone else had had good success rates with that method but probably not necessary, I then left the cut end in clean water for 24 hours then into live sphagnum , no cleaning of blades apart from running under tap no hormones or fancy stuff, sphagnum seems to stop cuttings going bad

I am a huge fan of putting cuttings in live, wet, spaghnum, seems to work every time.

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I will say the vine should be healthy , I tried with a crappy looking vine, and nothing, a nice fresh vine and good success, I maybe stating the obvious but it your cutting the vine because its unhealthy looking your success rate might not be much good

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I will say the vine should be healthy , I tried with a crappy looking vine, and nothing, a nice fresh vine and good success, I maybe stating the obvious but it your cutting the vine because its unhealthy looking your success rate might not be much good

Dont give up on the unhealthy nes, i just rescued a piece of old singalana which was mostly shrivelled and rotten. Had to cut the cutting twice as it was still rotting but finally it seems ok.

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