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My N. Muluensis from AW looklike its not going to pull through, all the plants i ordered from wistuba are doing great except this one. It was quite a bit smaller thean the others i recieved though. Its odd as i expected the N Rajah an N. Lowii i got in the same order to give me problems but they are doing great. Does anyone grow N. Muluensis and would be willing to share their conditions so i know for next time if i have done anything wrong? I'll add a photo maybe later but i warn you its not pretty.

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Every time I've tried this species I had the same results as you.  I think it is an ultra-highlander or at least grows higher up than N. rajah and N. lowii generally do.

 

I also believe it is very picky about the soil, like N. villosa, N. inermis and N. lamii.

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I figured as much Dave, I'm going to set up an ultra highlander area for Villosa in the new year so i'll try one in  there and see how it fares.

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Every time I've tried this species I had the same results as you.  I think it is an ultra-highlander or at least grows higher up than N. rajah and N. lowii generally do.

 

I also believe it is very picky about the soil, like N. villosa, N. inermis and N. lamii.

 

So what soil should one use for N. villosa and N. inermis? I have both and I'm curious if I could improve on their conditions

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Its winter and I am a tight fisted git so my house is ultra highland at the moment,I turned the radiator off in a spare room (the west wing ) and slightly open a window at night,any chance you could do similar to get cooler temps

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I'll pop a few pics up in case anyone is interested.

Firstly the casualty N. Muluensis

 

IMG_20141211_210248_zps1e4b2eef.jpg

 

My N. Rajah from roraima which is settling in nicely and has a nice leaf jump.

 

IMG_20141211_210311_zps123a9ae7.jpg

 

My 2 Rajahs from my recent AW order settling in nice too.

 

IMG_20141211_210304_zps860d3136.jpg

 

My Lowii which is the one i expected trouble from but has put out a new leaf and pitcher already since I've had it.

 

IMG_20141211_210320_zpse8b5f43c.jpg

 

My N. Inermis which is doing great and had a new pitcher for me too.

 

IMG_20141211_235820_zpsa15bad27.jpg

 

Bonus photo of my N. Glandulifera which i uploaded by accident so may as well share.

 

IMG_20141211_235842_zpsf02e6167.jpg

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Oh dear, that mulunensis has definitely had it i reckon, my mikei went exactly the same way and never recovered.

Seeing as both these plants can be classed as ultra highlanders, and they look like they've maybe damped off due to insufficient air circulation which they'd naturally get at high altitude. If memory serves me correctly, i think i lost my mikei before i put they large fan in the greenhouse on a 15 min on / 15 min off timer. I'm intending to get another mikei next Spring and try again with it, so we'll see what happens.

Anyway, what's your air circulation like where your neps are located Tom, and more importantly, is stale or fresh air being circulated ?

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I'm not sure air circulation is an issue as i have fans blowing in outside air 1-2 time a day depending on temperatures, i think i just had weedy Muluensis to be honest. It was noticeably smaller than the other plants in my order and in my experience smaller plants have to acclimate fast or seem to die. I'll definitely be trying this species again at a later date though as the uppers are beautiful on them.

 

How long did you mikei last before you lost it, My Muluensis never looked right in all honesty right from when i got it so i wasn't too surprised i lost it. I think i'm going to chalk it up to bad luck this time.

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Never managed to keep either of those alive for long, but i know other people dont have much trouble with mikeis in general.

I wonder if anyone has a decent size muluensis? Could be a bad or difficult clone. I used to think albomarginatas were difficult until i got a better clone.

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  • 1 month later...

Just an update:

 

This Muluensis is no more. It has ceased to be. It's expired and gone to meet its maker. This is a late Muluensis. It's a stiff. Bereft of life, it rests in peace. If you hadn't nailed it to the perch, it would be pushing up the daisies. It's rung down the curtain and joined the choir invisible. This is an ex-Muluensis.

 

Basically it died, Could anyone console me with a picture of their living Muluensis?

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I think i probably will do Welshy, In the next couple of months i'm bound to open another Wistuba order so i can guarantee it will end up sneaking on there :) 

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Guys, the air up that high is different.  These species are from mossy forest, so the soil must be very airy, more so than for most other species and it is often quite foggy as there is a near constant flow of humid air up from the lowlands that becomes saturated as it gets close to the top of the ridge/mountain.

 

Not a tropica mountain, but the effect is the same:

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Yeah, a soil with the largest portion being perlite.  Also, the way the air is super humid, makes it difficult for temperatures to change, even with full sun on the plants and they are warmed up, the air around will quickly wick the warmth out of the plants by the constant motion. 

 

These ultra highland plants can bake to death in conditions other species, like N. albomarginata actually enjoy.  Cool mist humidifiers make a difference if the plants aren't in a greenhouse or terrarium.  When the air is humid enough, Nepenthes are almost weedy with how robust their growth and ability to vine out for meters, but it is super critical for ultra highland species as their air is always moist.

 

There is a really nice replacement for perlite called "Burnt Earth", which actually is burned soil of a type of clay.  They use it a lot it Asia, but I don't know if it is available in the UK or US.  It is heavier and look nicer than perlite.  Work extremely well for species that like Ultramafic Soils.

Edited by Dave Evans
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