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Is this a Cephalotus Hummers Giant?


KEPBEPOS
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  with  the  9 cm pitcher 

 

In fact 10.1cm, not 9 cm. Don't eat 1.1 cm from the size of the pitcher hey...

 

 

This Hummer's giant pitcher has reached its full potential and stands at 10.1cm or 4 inches.

 

15293170804_4c669715e8_c.jpg

 

 

Marcus , you actually got  plant material from Hummer  and  u have that plant the same as Dimitar  showed  in  the other threads  and  Jen  form USA  with  the  9 cm pitcher  ,you have that plant there now  in AU  ??

 

 

Would it be possible MarcusB to trace them back to the particular plant described by John Hummer which in fact is the real HG cultivar?

 

?

Edited by dimitar
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Marcus , you actually got  plant material from Hummer  and  u have that plant the same as Dimitar  showed  in  the other threads  and  Jen  form USA  with  the  9 cm pitcher  ,you have that plant there now  in AU  ??

 

John, are you saying that John Hummer send material back to AU? If not then Marcus cannot have 'Hummer's Giant'

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Marcus , you actually got  plant material from Hummer  and  u have that plant the same as Dimitar  showed  in  the other threads  and  Jen  form USA  with  the  9 cm pitcher  ,you have that plant there now  in AU  ??

 

John, are you saying that John Hummer send material back to AU? If not then Marcus cannot have 'Hummer's Giant'

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Hello?

 

The real Hummer's Giant is the clone described by John Hummer and registered as a cultivar in 2000. This green thing does not match the description or the photograph that goes with the description therefore it isn't Hummer's Giant.

Charles' account is so full of errors and so vague that it must be discounted.

It may have come from John Hummer and it may also be part of the consignment that he received in 1986 but as it does not conform to the description it isn't the clone that was registered. if you then decide that the registration description doesn't matter ( already muted in a post ) as it's a Cephalotus then what is the point of registering any plant of this genus at all?

What it is is a Cephalotus that is capable of producing large pitchers and for some an attractive one. Perhaps we should be appreciating the plant and not the label?

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Sounds to me that hummers giant is lost in cultivation and pokies green thing as Fred puts it should be named if desired and people need to keep proper records(pretty obvious )I have one of presidents hummers giants but I brought the plant because I really liked the clone and it could of been called "bob" and I would of still purchased it.

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The real question that should be asked in this vicious circle is:  does John Hummer have more pictures of the particular plant he described as Hummer Giant?

Charles, can u help for this, please? 

 

That blurry pic used in the cultivar description is just bullshit and doesn't help at all..

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Fred, many clones and cultivars do not match the description in all growing conditions, even when they are genuine, so called dark clones being good examples.

 

The plant in my avatar is your "Big Boy", but the pitchers are not big due to the conditions I grew it in.

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Carl, do the growing conditions also change the shape and characteristics of the pitcher?

You are trying to paint a target around the arrow. You have no credible evidence of a link to Hummer's Giant so you have to go to the description. This plant fails that test.

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Carl, do the growing conditions also change the shape and characteristics of the pitcher?

 

Fred, I don't know. Can you provide me with the published description of "Big Boy", so that I can check my plant against it?

 

I am trying to seek other credible explanations of why 'Hummer's Giant' do not all match the cultivar description, rather than dismissing it out of hand as being fake.

 

I agree that a cultivar should match the description, but you know as well as I do that they often don't, even when the plant is genuine.

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Fred, I don't know. Can you provide me with the published description of "Big Boy", so that I can check my plant against it?

 

 

Nice one Carl, I appreciate a touch of facetiousness too. :tu:  

 

A very credible answer to why examples of Hummer's Giant do not match the cultivar description is because they're not the cultivar. It may very well be that Charles' plant was the real deal and after 14 years John Hummer published and registered a photo of the wrong clone. which would mean that Charles' plant would no longer be a Hummer's Giant. I have asked more than once if we could have a credible account from Charles' and it hasn't been forthcoming. So we are left with only the cultivar description and this plant does not meet it.

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Carl  just trying to See if Marcus B , had a HG plant / material sent to him  from USA , nothing more  ,in the time frame from  Reg to present  day, or some where in-between , as just would like to see  it  to  see what differences if any are here in AU .

 

I have to say ,  like Fred  the  original description  to me , dont  match the present day HG ,,have persistent this many times but all ways got shot down for  it, IMO they dont match up  from original registration  photo & description to now  big 10cm green monster ! which is so impressive have to say . only  my opinion ! 

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At least Charles can trace his plants back to John Hummer, more than most can. Irrespective of what the 'green thing' is, its pitcher size is extremely impressive and if stable deserves recognition.

 

The whole Cephalotus thing is a total mess. A combination of poor cultivar descriptions, lack of detail descriptions for many unregistered clones, unique characteristics being so minor making them almost indistinguishable, exaggeration or misrepresentation of characteristics, characteristics being subject to very specific conditions, etc.

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can we have  the original registration paper up and photo posted  ,any one have  it to  put  up ? the  original  photo  if possible 

 

now Dimi  you know we can that   that pant here  , dew to our  fantastic gov  regulations  that help all AU be free from diseases, except when  large company's bring in  equipment in that spread all sorts of  invasive plant material  around , that quite legal its seems  very double standard.

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can we have  the original registration paper up and photo posted  ,any one have  it to  put  up ? the  original  photo  if possible 

 

 

 

Done as ordered :)

 

v29n4p120f4.jpg

 

now Dimi  you know we can that   that pant here  , dew to our  fantastic gov  regulations  that help all AU be free from diseases, except when  large company's bring in  equipment in that spread all sorts of  invasive plant material  around , that quite legal its seems  very double standard.

 

He he he nice one mate :)

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so  just as an observation ,  the  pitcher  in  the Reg paper John states is stable and  pitchers are usually 6  to 7cm     with some  getting to 8  , but  its seems to been  may be different to  the  plants being sold  now ,  as impressive as they are  and I  want one !! would  one  agree  or not ?

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At least Charles can trace his plants back to John Hummer, more than most can. Irrespective of what the 'green thing' is, its pitcher size is extremely impressive and if stable deserves recognition.

 

 

Could you please slow down a bit Carl. Charles has reported he bought many plants from John Hummer at various times. I'm willing to bet he's also received many plants from other sources too. From his narrative it doesn't appear that his records are that accurate to definitely say the green thing was one of the ones from Hummer. ( Again I ask for an as accurate account as he can give.) His main stance appears to be it's an HG because it has the capability to produce big pitchers.

 

To go back to your wonderful piece of facetiousness. Why should I bother to spend time ( and money) writing a detailed description, taking cracking photographs and getting it all published if in the end you're going to ignore it.

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To go back to your wonderful piece of facetiousness. Why should I bother to spend time ( and money) writing a detailed description, taking cracking photographs and getting it all published if in the end you're going to ignore it.

 

The point is I wouldn’t ignore it. If the details and photos were concise enough to allow identification without reasonable doubt then it would serve to help positively identify it. There is a very reasonable chance that I have a genuine "Big Boy", as I have the recorded trail back to you from the seller, so it would be at least interesting to see if it matches up to a detailed description from the originator :wink:

 

Is the money element a function of your time? If you do not intend registering it then the detailed description could be digitally published, without cost to you. I'm sure I could get it hosted for free on the internet.

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so  just as an observation ,  the  pitcher  in  the Reg paper John states is stable and  pitchers are usually 6  to 7cm     with some  getting to 8  , but  its seems to been  may be different to  the  plants being sold  now ,  as impressive as they are  and I  want one !! would  one  agree  or not ?

No, I would bet that they are the same plants. Many people have purchased Hummer's giant over the years from Charles, and I am definitely not the first, nor will I be the last. I have 5 HG plants from Charles. However, only those under optimal conditions - happy plants - will achieve larger than normal pitchers or very robust growth. I have the luxury of growing plants under different conditions to test out growing parameters. The Hummer's giant plant I show is one plant under the best conditions I have found so far. The plants will tell you when they are not happy but I need not tell others this, as I am considered a novice grower by your standards. Simply having good genetics and god's good graces is not sufficient. As with all things, empiricism wins in the end. 

 

Instead of conjecture about this topic, some due diligence is in order. A cursory search will show that many fail to reach the 8cm mark, even when they have the real deal, and why is that?

Edited by pokie22
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