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maxxima

Nepenthes Sibuyanensis

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Just sharing my love for this species.

 

Anyone else keeping this plant ? Please share your photos, I'd love to see the variations.

 

 

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To my untrained eye, i would say that this maybe sibuyanensis x ventricosa and not pure sibuyanensis. Aren't sibuyanensis leaves supposed to be more pale oval and the pitchers tubbier and flatter bottomed ? Mine certainly is, but then again it's a much younger plant than yours. What do others think ?

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Someone on another forum said the pitchers get more elongated as the plant get to the vining stage. I have no idea, any experts care to comment ?
 

This is the plant 2 summers ago

 

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I keep mine in my lowland setup and it grows well...

However I only have juvenile pitchers for the moment.

 

And yes, strangely your plant seems to be particular for a N. sibuyanensis. Its pitchers are quite long.

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Edited by Kiwano

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Great plant! I did think the traps looked a little long, the one I grow is a smaller plant and the traps are a bit more squat but I'm certainly no expert. Our plant is grown in intermediate conditions (probably), so never goes below 18 degrees.

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Woah I always thought that sibu was a highlander? :blink:

If you look at the Altitudinal Distribution Chart it says it's an intermediate. I had problems with mine this summer with some of the young pitchers turning black and damping off, probably due to very high humidity and warm night time temperatures, despite having a large fan circulating air 24/7. I moved it to a shadier part of the greenhouse out of less direct sunlight and the blackening off problem stopped. Now, since the cooler days and colder nights have arrived, and the greenhouse environment is more accurately controlled by the heating thermostat and not the blazing summer sun, it's really starting to come to life with jumps in leaf and pitcher size. So i would consider it more of a highlander too.

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Mine is in a quite windy location. Full sun (south) but behind a thin curtain in summer. I don't shade winter sun. Intermediate temps but low humidity. In higher humidity in summer it keeps 4-5 pitchers going though so I assume it would enjoy more humidity.

Edited by maxxima

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I have two mature flowering plants, male and female and they definitely seem to prefer highland conditions particularly with a cap to upper temps of around 25C

it enjoys higher humidity combined with good air movement.

Pitchers do become taller as they mature (younger rosettes produce squatter pitchers)

Uppers are rare but if the vine is happy it will produce one or two each year.

the potting mix must be free draining and open and the plant needs space to bury its tendrils for best pitcher production.

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Thanks Dicon. Would you share pictures if you ever get the chance ?

 

I've made some research online and found both squat and elongated plants. I do wish mine were squatter though. For me only the first few pitchers of the season (summer) are squat and the rest are taller. Maybe it has something to do with my windowsill conditions. 

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