Recommended Posts

All of the sites I've seen in Covington Co, AL are seepage slope bogs: water from uphill slowly percolates into an open field, and the area that stays consistently saturated is filled with Sarracenia. After visiting countless sites, one major observation was made: S. flava var. rugelii seems to be more tolerant of water-logged habitat in comparison to S. leucophylla. Perhaps the yellow trumpet pitcher plant has a different root system by which it can tolerate slightly lower levels of oxygen, but who knows. Of course, there are exceptions to the rule: anytime you have moving water, even if it's really mucky and boggy, S. lecuophylla can grow there.

With all that in mind,the first photo below is an overview of a population of mainly S. flava var. rugelii. In the foreground, there's a dried up creek filled with tulip trees...it's too bad we didn't get to see them in bloom because those flowers are amazing! In the background, you can see a dense population of yellow trumpet pitcher plants. There's 2-3 main seeps that feed this bog:

15288249695_0c0b2fc238_b.jpg

And as you can see, this site is dominated by S. flava var. rugelii:

15287852962_7ab010cd46_c.jpg

15287841502_80dabbd4da_c.jpg

Homies in situ. I suppose on the other side of the pond, one would call them "mates" in situ:

15101457879_80abe4f55d_c.jpg

And here you can see how the plants grow from the water source. What you can't really tell from the photo is that almost every plant here is gigantic:

15265186296_17d005c61b_c.jpg

Some huge lids:

15101647358_b76336ea9e_c.jpg

Same trap with my hand to sort-of show scale. My hand isn't as fat as it used to be, haha:

15101655237_41d88f3b34_c.jpg

This spot is really beautiful, although it was hard to find because it occurs in the middle of a forest that doesn't seem like it would be conducive of this habitat:

15287824092_f6ae2d80a9_c.jpg

A few beauties, although they were past their prime:

15101650018_5b877bb7f3_c.jpg

15288217215_6fb7189968_c.jpg

15287828742_fd70a99881_c.jpg

S. leucophylla was also at this site, although they hadn't yet produced fall pitchers:

15287844732_00e2e99178_c.jpg

And a S. x moorei just popped open:

15101681757_a88cbaacf8_c.jpg

15287847742_9a730eb3c6_c.jpg

This one had an alien eye:

15101658148_8c97f83757_c.jpg

WE found the very rare S. flava var. maxima here, and I'll post pics shortly once they're uploaded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this