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Soil for pings

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KakaoTalk_20140812_101031444_zps1485173bP. moranensis var.alba

 

 

Hello,

I have a simple question.

I grow pings in the soil that mixture of Peat : Perlite : Silica sand : Coral sand. ( A component ratio is 1 : 1 : 1 : 1)

 

Is it good for Mexican Pings?

Or add some Voacanic sand (for aqua) and Orchid stone is better?

 

Please understand my English :)

Thank you!

 

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I have had good results with African violet mix and peatmoss 2:1, spag/basalt 1:1 and peat/sand/basalt 1:2:1

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I use equal parts of sand, perlite, peat and Tesco lightweight dust-free cat litter and it works really well.  You probably can't get that particular cat litter so you can use lava rock or pumice instead.

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I use vermiculite/cat litter (zeolite)/ dolomite about 2/2/1 my pings grow like in heaven :)))

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Wow, thank you all : )

I can't find zeolite in Korea so I will use lava rock or pumice instead of zeolite.

I test the soil mix of sand, perlite, dolomite, lava rock, vermiculite... etc.

Thank you!!

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I find Mexican Pinguicula to be easy going with regards to soil type. I have them growing in houseplant multipurpose compost. I sometimes add a little extra drainage using grit, perlite or other aggregate.

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Do Pinguicula benefit from some alkaline material (like the mentioned coral sand, pumice, dolomite etc) in the soil? Or do they just tolerate it well?

 

I plan on re-potting an unidentified Pinguicula, and want to give it the best substrate possible, but as I plan to keep it in the same tray as other CPs I wouldn't want any minerals leaching into the tray.

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Do Pinguicula benefit from some alkaline material (like the mentioned coral sand, pumice, dolomite etc) in the soil? Or do they just tolerate it well?

 

I plan on re-potting an unidentified Pinguicula, and want to give it the best substrate possible, but as I plan to keep it in the same tray as other CPs I wouldn't want any minerals leaching into the tray.

 

If you are considering Mexican Pinguicula then you might want to rethink about keeping them in water tray.

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Unfortunately I'm not sure what kind of Pinguicula is is yet, as I bought the plant without a label, but I will post a photo for clues as to its ID :).

 

I've just got the pot sitting in a tupperware tub with one of my VFTs, I don't let them sit in water unless I'm going away for more than a day though.

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I grow my Mexican pings on the tray method but I have a VERY open mix.

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If you are considering Mexican Pinguicula then you might want to rethink about keeping them in water tray.

 

Don't tell my plants that please, they're in 2" of water.

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Hello Fred

 

As I'm relatively new to pings I have potted mine in sarra compost but now it seems I can use G.P. compost, I'm confused. Even more confused when they sell fertilizer for cp's made from worm cast, I thought low nutrient compost was a must. and you can also use over diluted orchid feed. Is it me or is some goal post moving going on.

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Ian

The goal posts have always been the same, it's just our interpretation of where they are that differs.

 

Mexican Pinguicula will appreciate a little fertiliser in the compost. At present I am using peat / peat based general compost / granite grit in a 1:1:1 ratio for them. Other carnivores will also respond to a dilute feeding of liquid fertiliser, it's normally totally unnecessary though. If you are unsure on what fertiliser to use, when and on what the safest option is don't  I have used a Sarracenia type medium for Mexican Pinguicula without detriment to the plants.

The current trend for fertilising I believe is due to our friends over the pond who appear to insist on growing everything totally unnaturally in terraria under artificial light using dead sphagnum moss as a medium, completely sealed off from any opportunity to catch their own meals. I think the hobby for them is down to finding the next gadget they can install to attempt to defeat the ambient climate.

* coughs and steps back from his soapbox before he says too much and upsets someone

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Don't tell my plants that please, they're in 2" of water.

 

Didn't say it wasn't possible Fred, indeed I have one or two standing in water, but I typically grow Mexican pings a little dryer. Having said that, they are pretty difficult to kill.

 

Hello Fred

 

As I'm relatively new to pings I have potted mine in sarra compost but now it seems I can use G.P. compost, I'm confused. Even more confused when they sell fertilizer for cp's made from worm cast, I thought low nutrient compost was a must. and you can also use over diluted orchid feed. Is it me or is some goal post moving going on.

Mexican pings seem to take well to fertiliser. Like I said, I have them in multipurpose compost, which obviously contains fertilisers. Some other CPs benefit from fertiliser, though not mulipurpose compost. I use plant food on Mexican Pinguicula, Cephalotus and Heliamphora.

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The current trend for fertilising I believe is due to our friends over the pond

I have been using fertiliser on CPs for years Fred :wink:

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I have been using fertiliser on CPs for years Fred :wink:

I was using them around 1986 on specific plants. It wasn't a  generally recommended practise at the time as it is now. Many newcomers will ( and do) believe it is a necessity whereas we old fogies know it is not..

Edited by FredG

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So I've been reading about soil for Pinguicula spp. and the gist seems to be that the genus as a whole isn't fussy, there's anecdotal evidence that some Mexican species do better in an alkaline soil mix, and the wetter you keep them the more open the soil mix should be.

 

Going from all the forum posts I've been trawling through, people tend to use a greater variety of soil mixes (according to personal preference) than with other CPs, and those soil mixes contain a greater variety of materials!

 

Now after research I'm not too worried about what soil mix I use, no matter what my pings ID is lol  :laugh2: . I'll keep it wet but not standing in water for now, once I get at least a rough ID I'll do some research on its natural habitat (or it's parents habitats) and base my watering regime on that.

 

For soil I'll use what I have around, but make it a more open mix than the 1 part silica sand : 1 part sphagnum moss peat that I use for my VFTs.  Probably 1:1:1 of silica:peat:play sand, since I know play sand is relatively inert, but will have more minerals than the aquarium silica sand I use. Might throw some LFS in there too since I have it. 

Edited by notostracan

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Another sensible Scot  :biggrin:

 

I'd have prefered a fine aquarium gravel to the play sand but that's my personal preference.

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I think i was late to give my opinion about this subject, but i think still worth writing a few lines on this issue; a long time ago i created a thread in this forum that addressed something and the concussion i got foristas and others you find here.

 

Best regards,

 

Rodrigo

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Yeah I'd find the play sand too fine and would compact things down a lot. Personal experience.  I used to use it in the aquarium though.

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I'll just use a small handful of play sand for the sake of it then lol, and use a higher ratio of silica sand (which is more like fine gravel compared to the play sand). Cheers!

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Granite grit!!!  Why didn't I think of that?  I should have a partial bag of that out in the barn somewhere.

Thanks Fred!

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I started many Mexican Pinguicula, in 100% moss peat (peat moss), first. They did well. Then I read Eric Partrat's site Pinguicula.org, and decided to try various media ingredients and combinations thereof. I discovered very little, if any difference in health or growth performance, no matter what media I used, as long as I gave them very strong flourescent lighting, weak and frequent feeding with dried insect powder and weak soluble fertilizer solutions, and kept them nearly semi-aquatically, year-'round. There are a few species that do not thrive in these conditions, but the majority do.

 

The list of ingredients and combinations, I've tried, is extensive. Yet, I'm sure I haven't tried every combination that would be suitable. I haven't yet found any that aren't.

Edited by Joseph Clemens

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I discovered very little, if any difference in health or growth performance, no matter what media I used [...]

This is similar to my experiences. I have tried growing them in a variety of mineral based mixes, some with adding calcium, iron oxide etc. etc., but have't really noticed any difference to growing them in normal houseplant potting mix. In my conditions they don't seem to be particularly fussy with regards to the soil mix. Maybe there are some minor differences that I would possible notice if I grew the same clones side by side in different mixes, and maybe there are some Mexican pings that are fussy, but to be honest the few common ones I have grow just fine for me in potting mix, so I no longer bother with the fuss or cost of exotic mixes.

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