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Mato

Darlingtonia of Southern Oregon and Northern California

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Also incredible ... Looking at Google maps. Just how many national parks/reserves/designated areas can you fit in one place? I appreciate that US scales (compared to UK) are something else but still...

 

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Also incredible ... Looking at Google maps. Just how many national parks/reserves/designated areas can you fit in one place? I appreciate that US scales (compared to UK) are something else but still...

 

*** can't seem to delete an accidental second post ***

Edited by Hud357

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Also incredible ... Looking at Google maps. Just how many national parks/reserves/designated areas can you fit in one place? I appreciate that US scales (compared to UK) are something else but still...

 

 

There is a lot to see in that part of the country. Here in the western USA, we're lucky to have so many designated national and state parks, with even more set aside for other purposes down the line. There is actually a fight to protect more of the wilderness around O'Brien from copper mines and such, which I sincerely hope works out, as the area is unquestionably unique in terms of native vegetation, Darlingtonia aside. 

 

Regarding all the protected land, different agencies oversee these, whether Bureau of Land Management, Forestry Service, Parks Services, etc., so you really do need a detailed map to know where you stand in this regard.

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Very good habitat pictures! Also nice to see a kind of Lilium and the yellow Narthecium. We have a related Narthecium here, N. ossifragum. Also found in seepage habitats and bogs. And D. rotundifolia with D. anglica. And Darmera peltata grows there also, a gardenplant downhere.

 

Alexander

Edited by Alexander Nijman

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Very good habitat pictures! Also nice to see a kind of Lilium and the yellow Narthecium. We have a related Narthecium here, N. ossifragum. Also found in seepage habitats and bogs. And D. rotundifolia with D. anglica. And Darmera peltata grows there also, a gardenplant downhere.

 

Alexander

 

I wish more photos had been taken of the surrounding flora, as I found that aspect of the habitat extremely interesting. Different types of orchids, lilium, wild azalias, and fritillaria were everywhere. Serpentine soils pave the way for some really incredible plants.

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