Pinhook Bog


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  • 2 weeks later...

Those are actually Drosera intermedia. The bog contains only two species: Drosera intermedia and Drosera rotundifolia, unfortunately no Drosera anglica.

Are you sure?

Because 6 for me is looking like a young D. anglica. Because Traps are quite long compared to the width. But maybe it's a missinterpretation due to the magnification.

But 5 should be a D. intermedia. Although very young D. anglica look similar. That's somtimes tricky. Are D. anglica known there? Because you said unfortunately no D. anglica. Not recognized, or didn't you find one?

 

Best Regards,

 

Michael

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Are you sure?

Because 6 for me is looking like a young D. anglica. Because Traps are quite long compared to the width. But maybe it's a missinterpretation due to the magnification.

But 5 should be a D. intermedia. Although very young D. anglica look similar. That's somtimes tricky. Are D. anglica known there? Because you said unfortunately no D. anglica. Not recognized, or didn't you find one?

 

Best Regards,

 

Michael

 

 

100%, Drosera anglica is not endemic to any part of Indiana, they are in states farther north. I apologize for the misleading camera angle.

Edited by PitcherPlanter
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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks for pics - it's not often we see pics from the middle of USA.

 

What is in the bottom right corner of pic #4?

 

I believe you're referring to the gray object in the corner? It's part of the walkway in the bog to make access easier. The Sphagnum almost absorbs the path in certain sections.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Very nice. What kind of Utricularia is that?

 

I saw yesterday also plenty Drosera rotundifolia at a couple of places near Bussum in The Netherlands. Drosera rotundifolia is the most common CP here.

 

In my town is also a population. When you get poor acid humid/wet peat or sand they can colonize it in not time. I did see that yeasterday in a naturereserve where they had restored the habitat by removing the top layer of nutriend rich soil. It was a former meadow, now lots of intersting plants growing there among several rare ones like Pilularia globulifera, wich is much rarer then D. rotundifolia. And there is also a bit of seepage in that area wich is always a good sign for special vegetation.

 

Alexander

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Very nice. What kind of Utricularia is that?

 

I saw yesterday also plenty Drosera rotundifolia at a couple of places near Bussum in The Netherlands. Drosera rotundifolia is the most common CP here.

 

In my town is also a population. When you get poor acid humid/wet peat or sand they can colonize it in not time. I did see that yeasterday in a naturereserve where they had restored the habitat by removing the top layer of nutriend rich soil. It was a former meadow, now lots of intersting plants growing there among several rare ones like Pilularia globulifera, wich is much rarer then D. rotundifolia. And there is also a bit of seepage in that area wich is always a good sign for special vegetation.

 

Alexander

 

Hello Alexander,

 

The Utricularia in the photo is Utricularia geminiscapa, which is quite rare in this area and endangered in my state.

 

As for carnivorous plants, there are not very many places where you can find Drosera or Sarracenia. There is though, quite an abundance of Utricularia.

 

Thank you for sharing by the way! That must be quite interesting having an abundance of D. rotundifolia population so close to you. To my knowledge, there are only two places where one can find D. rotundifolia,  D. intermedia or S. purpurea near me (they seem to almost always appear together), one being Pinhook Bog and the other being Cowles Bog. The population at Cowles Bog is actually hidden and not very many people know about it or how to find it, not even park rangers. But in the sand dunes of Lake Michigan to the north of me, there are several swales that have been preserved from the industrialization on the lake shore. In the fall U. cornuta flowers en masse which can be quite spectacular. Here is a photo of one of the early flowers I took several days ago.

 

i29ds4.jpg

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