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pokie22

Pokie's Cephalotus

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A request from Dimi to post a few of my cephs for others to view. I grow them in my incubator :shout:

 

Hummer's Giants (Charles Brewer)

Their state upon receipt on 12/31/2013

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And two of them now, 5 months later:

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Cephalotus typical (#1, Charles Brewer)

 

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Cephalotus Vigorous

As received on 9/5/2013

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And the plant 7 months later:

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Edited by pokie22
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A request from Dimi to post a few of my cephs for others to view. I grow them in my incubator :shout:

 

Hummer's Giants (Charles Brewer)

There state upon receipt on 12/31/2014

14314733755_bac9501525_c.jpg

 

 

 

Thanks Jen.

 

Very nice looking collection there. These plants grow really well for u in your incubator lol :Laie_97:

 

I can assure u that some of those grow well and they are already quite well established under my conditions.

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Cephalotus Typical (MH)

This plant can achieve dark colors if given the correct stimulation. The pitchers are short and fat. Pictures of its progression through time.

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Hi Jen,

Those are fine looking plants.

Travelling through time? "Their state upon receipt on 12/31/2014" that's next Christmas! - Joking aside, they all look like they are thriving. Any chance of a photo of your 'incubator'?

Cheers,

Steve

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:wall3:

 

Dates. Ugh. Erratum fixed, thanks for the catch Steve.

 

I will post some pictures of the incubator. It is basically a refrigerator with a light controlled thermostat. Coincidentally, it also serves as an incubator for my highland tissue culture.

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I like the notes on the side of the Typical's (HM) pot. However, with pitchers measuring "22cm" and "24cm" it would have to be a mega giant. ;-)

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yep  that sure is a big  pitcher, Jen  think best to stop using gamma radiation therapy on  your cephs  there getting  out of hand  :nuke:

 

look forward to seeing  the  incubator in action :lookeye:

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LOL. I am from the other side of the pond where standard inches is employed, but in the sciences we use metrics. There should be a ".", and thus 2.2cm and 2.4cm. However without saying this, in my mind, and yours,  it was already 2.2 and 2.4 :on_the_quiet: . The notation was probably made in great haste no doubt, and during a free moment between experiments. My love for post it notes - scribbles for my reference as I abuse them - is really not the best the way.

 

No gamma radiation here, :blum3: . Althoughh I do get comments about being "hot", I doubt it is from the geiger counter. It is much easier to perform genetic manipulation with plant viruses via Ti plasmids and agrobacterium. Since cephs are a favorite, I was going to make some special Christmas presents for friends :to_become_senile:.  We will see if I have some extra time this year, I am very behind on promised planty experiments.

 

I am sure the cephs would grow much faster if I ceased my penchant for pulling leaves and pitchers off. Oddly enough, I think my plants are masochists, and reward my bad behavior with new leaves/pitchers/growth points from the wounded area. I guess, I will not be learning my lesson.

 

The HL incubator is nothing special. In essence, a normal house refrigerator on a control with some lights inside.

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I do keep cephs under a few other conditions, one of which is a constant 20C incubator. I keep most plants in some controlled environment. I do have a heli freezer as well, but that is for another thread.

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Are we to gather from this that Cephs like being cold ? I often say Cephs are utterly unpredictable, surely the most contrary plants in the world.

 

Not so much the cold, but mild temperatures.  My plants usually grow best when the temperature is in the 18- 25oC range.  At warmer temperatures I try to keep the pots cool in water.  In this set up I would expect that keeping the roots cool would not be a problem and that the plants would not have to be kept as wet as at higher temperatures.

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the  information   that Phil Mann put up was  that  the optimum for cephalotus growing at there prime as around 25c   in high sun exposure, ,  but that can vary from  climate to climate through out  the world .

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Well nobody even typed a groan at my "heli freezing over" pun... I'm used to it - my kids just look at me with raised eyebrows!

 

On a more serious point I am not sure I understand the purpose of the fridge:

 

  • Is it actively cooling the plants to 20*C in an otherwise hot environment?
  • Is it just an old unit that is conveniently insulated and therfore a stable environment ?
  • What day/night cycle do the lights run for?
  • Don't they get hot in there or does the refrigeration deal with that?

 

Sorry if those are daft-laddie questions. However there is no denying that your plants look fabulous.

Cheers,

Steve

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I have a heli freezer, so I thought it as very apro pos. :laugh2:

 

The 20C incubator is for my planaria husbandry and is not a refrigerator but a lab grade isotemp incubator. That temperature setting is for my planaria and not the plants. There just happens to be extra space for a few test plants.

 

Everything is on a 16ON/8OFF cycle.  

 

Yes, the refrigeration from the lights is cooled by the refrigeration unit. However, the cooling capacity must not be exceeded. This must be configured experimentally for each unit, as the compressor will overheat :negative: and turn off when the capacity is exceeded, i.e. there are too many bulbs, take one out and try again. :whistle3:

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Cephalotus Black Form (BCP)

received on 7/1/2013

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A picture I took last night of a black form in the 20C:

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A healthy looking plant, but hardly 'black'.

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Yes, the name is not a characteristic indicator. However, I grow these under low lighting since this incubator does not have high cooling capacity. Their purpose is not color in this case, but to observer growth rates of plants from the same clone line under different parameters. 

 

In the past, when I placed cephs in my heli freezer (high light intensity) they readily darken but the pitchers remain small. Sigh, alas there is no room in there for new experiments. 

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Not all Hummer giant plants are the same in vigor or capacity, and as with all plants the pitcher size is directly correlated to growing conditions. Out of the 5 Hummer giant cephs I have from Charles, this plant is the second slowest to put out pitchers, and to inflate them. 3'' pitchers from a Hummers giant is rare even if one purchases from the source. Charles has achieved this only on a few plants, and I suspect this cutting is probably not from one of those plants. Some things have to be sacred to thyself, right? Extremely happy plants in their preferred growing conditions = GIANT pitchers or SUPER GIANT pitchers (just for you Charles :on_the_quiet: ).  

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Hi All

 

I see that I contributed to the creation of discussion.

It was not my goal to create a dispute.

 

I’m cultivate Cephalotus plants for only several years and my experience in this group of plants is only just emerging.

 

I can at this moment completely agree with Mr. Dave Evans and pokie22.

.

Effects of light intensity, humidity, substrate composition, etc. has a very large impact on the appearance of the plant.

 

I put a link to my topic and update, please check this :

 

....

 

As seen in the example of Big Boy, just change the light intensity to get a lot bigger sizes traps, and speed up the growing.

 

As many of the breeders - so many different growing conditions and many different plants.

Thank You Pokie's for confirm my beginner clue.

 

Regards

Marek

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