Time for Sarracenia seedlings to show characteristics


mattynatureboy44
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How long do those of you who grow from seed give your seedlings to show any potential?  when growing lots from seed space is an issue, so I am interested in what others do here, at what age or size do you go through the seedlings and choose your favourites or ones to get rid of.

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Guest paul y

ive been told by those with decades experience to let them get into the first year or two of flower,  they quite often express traits upon sexual maturity and after reaching maturity, bit like people then.

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Yes sometimes the slowest growers can have the most interesting characteristics

I couldn't agree more.

I try to grow all the plants on for as long as possible regarding hybrids as for forms you can get an idea much earlier for example if you want a flava that is all red then you can tell early on that all the green ones are not what you are after.

Eventual overall shape can be a tough one as plants will change up to maturity and sometimes after.

Eventual size is the long haul one as you have to wait many years and then you may have to wait for the "right" conditions to see it at its best.

As Stephen said vigour is no indication of a giant and the runt of the litter can catch up and excel.

Persistence and determination with endless grow space and a long life is ideal.

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All good advice.

I also start with an idea before pollination of what I want.

Then I start when I re-pot the first time,I look for good strong roots

i also select for vigorous plants from the start because i don't use fertilizer on seedlings then the cold where i live will sort any weaklings out..

Also,be ruthless.If it isn't what you want,get rid of it and grow some more

ada

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I agree with you guys. For the moment i have still space to keep the most part of all seedlings. And i am agree that several small seedlings could become very beautiful plants if we leave them a chance to grow up.

 

I think the most difficult thing for me is to keep the best and kill the rest. Very difficult ==(

 

Oliv

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Some of the jaw dropping hybrids in cultivation today stick out like a sore thumb early on, about two years after germination (this is with a "normal" rate of growth). This isn't always the case though, as stated above.

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Guest paul y

don't be hestitant when culling stock,  its necessary, you have to look at the bigger picture, space and time are the most premium commodities, if a plant isn't up to standard and its had enough time to get there then compost it,  that space can be used for something more worthwhile.  big balls and short memory span are whats needed.

there are plenty of people on here that have binned hundreds of plants at a time,  I dread to think of the herbaceous stock ive thrown over the years, at the end of the day keeping plants is the same as keeping livestock, the individual can and will be sacrificed for the good of the whole,  how many farmers keep 3 legged sheep?

how many cp growers keep self seeded capensis?

bin it forget it replace it (with something more promising)

regards paul

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This is an interesting and important question. Yes, in an ideal situation, we should let grow all seedlings up to maturity. However in practice many of us (including me) have definitely no place for this. I have many hundreds of seedlings, some resulting from crosses with high potential (and I am currently in the process to make new interesting pollinisations...). However, sooner or later, I will have to make drastic selections. I think that in the future I will make a first sorting after 3 or 4 years, even if I risk to loose some good plants. Since last year I am using some fertilizers (mostly granulates for rhododendrons) and I see obvious growth acceleration.

 

Another option would be to share seedlings with colleagues and to ask them to have the right to be the first to receive a division if something truly interesting does emerge.

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