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Richard Bunn

Growing Aldrovanda Outdoors

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OK I'm in the process of buying an Aldrovanda and haven't a clue how to grow it. I read the brief chapter in The Savage Garden about growing it and have put some peat in some rainwater out the back to leave things settle for a few days. I didn't realise I needed a reasonably shallow container so am going to have to get something from the discount store, one of those clear plastic oblong boxes will do.  

 

D'Amato says that I need some other plants in there too to emit CO2 into the water. He mentions Juncus, Carex, Typha or Water Hyacinth.  Where on earth do I get any of these? The only one I'm familiar with is the Water Hyacinth from my aquarium keeping days.

 

Anyone else here growing Aldrovanda (my one will be a form from Italy) outdoors? Care to share some growing advice?

 

Thanks

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This is my little experience

 

I am inspired by this article to make my tank (it's french) http://www.rossolis.org/article51.html

 

this is my installation :
in a large tank, I put a mixture of peat moss with sand (5cm). peat should be moistened beforehand. Remove the pieces floating. Above, I put the geotextil, not peat rises to the surface. The geotextil is maintained by a layer of sand or gravel or pozzolan (3cm).
Substrate height is greater on one side so that Carex, Rushes are located 15 to 20 cm up to the surface of the water. allow these plants to oxygenate the water. Require drilling holes in 4-5cm from the top of the tank to drain distances exceeding water after a heavy rain.
My tank is outside all year in the sun. Over the tray, the less there will be difference brutal temperatures in the day. Attention, it is important to avoid abrupt temperature change.
the summer, I put water regularly to regulate the temperature when it is very hot during the day.

image310.png

 

p1030111.jpg

 

plants begin to grow after the winter (size is nearly 4cm)

p1030110.jpg

Edited by castor123456
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Thanks for the brilliant info.  I'm going to get a Juncus spiralis like you have there, also an Iris kaempferi. I figured the Iris would be more attractive than getting something like Typha minima. It would perform the same job wouldn't it??????

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I'm going to get a Juncus spiralis like you have there, also an Iris kaempferi. I figured the Iris would be more attractive than getting something like Typha minima. It would perform the same job wouldn't it??????

Indeed, this plant is more beautifull. I don't know if this plant will be as good

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Wish I could Stephen but I'm going to be in possession of the plant in a few days.  It's rainwater and I already have the peat in there.  If the turion is still dormant then I'll have a little grace time before the companion plants arrive.

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I had them here a couple of years ago growing outside. Well they are not easy to grow. And for some mysterious reeason the turions did never survive the winter. I had the red and green European ones.

 

Alexander

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The secret about growing it (one of the many to be honest) is a stabilized environment. You need to prepare your container many weeks before you get your plants. Try to use clay soil at the bottom, some monocot plants, water from a pond or river, dead leaves of monocots with peat and a CO2 injector (can be a homemade one).

Take a look on my set up:

http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=51752

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This is my little experience

I am inspired by this article to make my tank (it's french) http://www.rossolis.org/article51.html

this is my installation :

in a large tank, I put a mixture of peat moss with sand (5cm). peat should be moistened beforehand. Remove the pieces floating. Above, I put the geotextil, not peat rises to the surface. The geotextil is maintained by a layer of sand or gravel or pozzolan (3cm).

Substrate height is greater on one side so that Carex, Rushes are located 15 to 20 cm up to the surface of the water. allow these plants to oxygenate the water. Require drilling holes in 4-5cm from the top of the tank to drain distances exceeding water after a heavy rain.

My tank is outside all year in the sun. Over the tray, the less there will be difference brutal temperatures in the day. Attention, it is important to avoid abrupt temperature change. the summer, I put water regularly to regulate the temperature when it is very hot during the day.

image310.png

p1030111.jpg

plants begin to grow after the winter (size is nearly 4cm)

p1030110.jpg

Nice

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The secret about growing it (one of the many to be honest) is a stabilized environment. You need to prepare your container many weeks before you get your plants. Try to use clay soil at the bottom, some monocot plants, water from a pond or river, dead leaves of monocots with peat and a CO2 injector (can be a homemade one).

Take a look on my set up:

http://www.cpukforum.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=51752

Well I did all that but I had only the temperate Aldrovanda forms from Europe. Maybe the gropical ones are easier as they grow all year round. And an indoor aquarium is much more controlable then an outside container where you get variations in temperature over the year.

 

Alexander

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