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Trev

More CP's in the wild!

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Well after my much appreciated picture of P. lusitanica in the wild, here are the pictures from my latest ramble in the mountains above my house here in S.W. Ireland.

P. vulgaris I presume? (and no I didn't put the ant there:)

p.vulgarism.JPG

The most rotund rotundifolia I've ever seen!

D.fatladysm.JPG

2 in 1

drosandpingsm.jpg

These last 3 are of an old peat workings that is now home to a whole colony of Drosera ? is it anglica or intermedia ?

drosm.jpg

dros1sm.JPG

dros2sm.JPG

Trev. :lol:

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Hi Darrell,

As far as I'm aware, (and I'm no authority on them) the native Irish CP's are:

D. rotundifolia

D. anglica

D. intermedia

P. vulgaris

P. grandiflora

P. lusitanica (see my recent thread - P.lusitanica in the wild!)

U. vulgaris

Oh, and Sarracenia purpurea has been introduced into quite a few bogs now.

Trev. :lol:

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Do U. minor or U. intermedia reach Ireland? Love the pics - keep them coming!

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Those last 3 pics are Drosera intermedia. Nice pics Trev!

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Thanks everyone, it's great to be able to share these with you now I have a camera. If I wax lyrical about them around here I get strange looks! 8-[

Pitcherboy, I'm not sure of other Utric's in Eire, I found U. vulgaris in a small lake on the other side of the mountain, if I remember I will try and look it up in the library.

Mike, how do you tell intermedia from anglica?? (P.S. finally got an email from NCCPG:)

Trev. :lol:

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Thanks for that link Aidan. unfortunately...

The topic or post you requested does not exist
:(

I just did a search on Google and found an excellent page on native Irish carnivorous plants here :-

http://www.ipcc.ie/infocarnivorous1.html

It says there are 11 native CP's and 1 introduced in 1906

3 Drosera

3 Pings

4 Utrics

1 Sarra

on D. intermedia and anglica it says :-

Sundew D. intermedia is local in the west of Ireland, typically growing in clumps on bare, exposed peat. Finally, the Long-leaved Sundew D. anglica, commonly grows in permanent pools on the bog.

which would suggest that the ones I pictured above are anglica, as they are growing on top of floating sphagnum and I haven't found any growing in any other conditions?

Trev. :D

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Hi Trev,

you lucky - there's no need of a bog garden for you ;-)

I like your pictures! The diffused sunlight let them look really nice!

Cheers,

Markus

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Great photos Trev! :)

I agree with Mike, they look like D. intermedia to me. As well as the leaf shape, which fits D. intermedia not D. anglica, the manner in which the flower scape arises from the plant is characteristic of D. intermedia. It doesn't arise straight up out of the centre of the rosette, as it does in D. anglica or in D. rotundiflora; this is shown excellently in the second photograph. Rather, the scape in D. intermedia arises between the leaves and grows out at angle intially and then becomes vertical; this is clearly shown in the superb last photograph.

Looking through my 20-year old field trip notes, we saw and keyed out 3 species of bladderwort on a Uni botanising trip to W. Ireland (Kerry - Connamarra); Utricularia australis, U. minor and U. intermedia, but didn't see U. vulgaris which does occur in Ireland, in less acidic waters.

This web page, from the Irish Peatland Conservation Council, gives a useful summary of the CPs of Ireland, though the address for CPS Membership is out of date!! http://www.ipcc.ie/infocarnivorous1.html

Vic

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