Winter Pinguicula Deaths


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This is the first year I have really delved into pings but only 1 survives out of the 3 I had, and winter isn't over yet...Both of the ones that died where inside while the other was outside, so maybe that had something to do with it. The weird thing being is they looked fine for a couple of months or more indoors, but then just died. Anyone have any thoughts or speculations to the cause of this?

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It drives me straight to insanity situations like this, ive only just started growing pings so im the last person to ask, I feel for you though unexplained plant deaths are maddening. there are some real experts lurking about on here so im sure you will get an answer

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It will be easier to understand if you list which species/hybrids you are (or were) growing and which conditions you used for them. Temperatures, light exposure, substrate and water level will be helpful to make a better guess.

Best regards

Dieter

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Hi,

if you don't tell us more or show some pictures nobody can help you.

Please answer these question:

Do you know what species it is?

If not is it mexican or temperate?

Can you show us pictures?

What are the growing conditions?

The answer you can expect is only as good as the facts you tell! :-)

Cheers Marcus

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Whilst we wait for the added info other members have suggested you provide, I'll share my experience with Mexican Pings when I first grew them a few years back.

During their 1st winter I kept my Mexicans indoors in a spare bedroom (due to having no heating in my greenhouse). I was able to keep most of them in a covered propagator which helped keep up the humidity but, as is often the case, I bought more than I had room for in this environment and a few others had to take their chances in the windowsill of the same room. The windowsill is above a radiator which is linked to our gas fired heating system and which causes a dry atmosphere. Needless to say whilst the Pings in the propagator came through the winter in good condition those in the windowsill didn't fair too well and a few P. ehlersiae appeared to die. I say "appeared" to die because when I took the pots up to the greenhouse in the Spring they eventually all sprouted again and are now quite healthy. The strange thing about these "dead" ones is they all sprouted double heads which does look at bit odd.

So maybe you have a similar problem and, if you decide to keep any indoors in future, you just need to raise the humidity level. I notice you live in California which I know has a very dry atmosphere (at least in LA which is the only place in CA I've visited). Anyway I'm sure others will add their thoughts especially after you have given us more details to work on.

Good luck.

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Ok, I'll try to give as much info I can about them.

Plant A: P. Gigantea

Conditions: 3 hours of light...around that give or take. The temperature is in the 15 to 21 Celcius range (for those who use it, and 65 to 70 Fahrenheit for US residents).

Plant B: Unknown, probably Mexican though.

Conditions: 4 hours of sun. Temperature same as the P. Gigantea.

Thanks for your guys help in this matter, it just seems perplexing that they were doing fine for such a while. Another thing is I transplanted the P. Gigantea, so maybe that had something to do with it, thanks!

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What compost are they in and how much water have they been getting? When you say 3 hours of light for the P. gigantea, do you mean only 3 hours in total during a 24 hour period? Are they in a basement or something?

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They rotted from a lack of light and too much water. Unlike most carnivorous plants, Mexican Pinguicula need very loose, mostly mineral soils which are not wet. The soil needs to fluctuate between moist and damp, never wet, sometimes dry. Not sure how strong the light is, but I doubt 3 to 4 hours is going to keep much of anything alive... Any reason for so few hours?

Edited by Dave Evans
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They rotted from a lack of light and too much water. Unlike most carnivorous plants, Mexican Pinguicula need very loose, mostly mineral soils which are not wet. The soil needs to fluctuate between moist and damp, never wet, sometimes dry. Not sure how strong the light is, but I doubt 3 to 4 hours is going to keep much of anything alive... Any reason for so few hours?

Yeah, thanks for the explanation,and that may explain why my outside ping is still alive and thriving due to the fact it gets around 6 hours of sun and sometimes goes without water. The unknown ping window is facing the opposite way of the sun and there is a small cover above, so it gets very little sun...and the P. Gigantea is in the computer room with blinds, and I don't want prying eyes looking at the computer to possibly steal while i am away, but i will try to open it when I am at home to maximize growth of the remaining plants in there that have yet to die...Thank you all for helping me find the culprit!

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Just tell people its a houseplant--you don't have to mention it is rare and you can't buy it at the store... But if it is the computer you're worried about, can't help there. :(

Edited by Dave Evans
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