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Christian

carnivorous plants in Jackson County, Mississippi

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Hi all,

we have been at several locations in Jackson County. The first one is just a few miles away from the Stone County Sarracenia alata population. There we found some Drosera, Pinguicula primuliflora as wella as some S. alata :)

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A bit further in the south we could find some more S. alata, one of them had a frog in it :)

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We had the great luck (totally unplaned, just by chance) to meet the Manager of the Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge in the early afternoon that day. He told us to know some carnivorous plants location in the Refuge, which he wanted to show us. As we all knew, that this is a chance we won't have again we were more than happy to go with him.

On the way to the location we got to see couple with it's chick of the rare Sandhill Crane.

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In the refuge, we could see the following plants:

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Maybe some of you do know "The Shed" close to Interstate 10, north of Ocean Springs. This one was recommended to us for having dinner. What noone told is was, that there may be some rain coming through the roofs if it's raining outside. The following picture has been taken inside the Restaurant :)

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Finally, a nice day came to it's end. We had totally other plans for that day, but most often the unexpected things are what you will remember for quite some time, and that's definitely true for that day :)

regards,

Christian

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Beautiful images Christian, thanks for shared with us. Just an question, in the fourth photo sure that Drosera is a D. intermedia? I ask this because i confess that have never seen this plant species grow in this way.

Best regards,

Rodrigo

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Hello,

yes, this should be a D. intermedia, even if it looks a bit like D. madagascariensis. We have seen quite a lot of sometimes quite different looking D. intermedias in the US. There have been only D. capillaris and D. filiformis var. tracyi close by (as far as we could see). I don't think, that a hybrid of any of those species could look like that. As long as nobody corrects me I think, this is just one of the many types of D. Intermedia.

Christian

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Christian, the Paulo Minatel explained that this plant really is a D. intermedia. The reason for it to have grown vertically due to the fact that it live in a region that suffers constant flooding and this would be an adaptation of the plant to live under such circumstances. When the water recedes we see and CP shown in the photo.

Best regards,

Rodrigo

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