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While in Sarracenia territory, we happened to stumble upon a couple of pinguiculas in the wild. Butterworts weren't found at many sites, but when they were there, they grew in abundance. Interestingly enough, they could be found in areas that no sarracenia (has ever gone before, hehe) could ever survive because it was way too dry! Perhaps these Southern butterworts are somewhat like their mexican cousins in the sense that they produce relatively succulent leaves, which allow them to tolerate more drought-like conditions. Their compact growth and small surface area may also be the reason they can grow in these dry areas.

We mostly saw Pingicula lutea in a lot of sites, and I was shocked to see many of these yellow flowered butterworts produced thin, pencil-like elongated leaves. unfortunately, I don't think I photographed any :( . Perhaps this is because the grass gets so tall by end of the summer that they have to find some way to get more light, or else they'll bite the dust.

I had been dreaming of finding P. primuliflora before the trip (never seen it in situ before), and on the plane ride home, I lamented that we didn't see any....until we went over the photos and realized we did see them!!!! Sorry Fernando, if you're out there, we didn't mean to let you down with our crappy ping skills :)

Anyhow, here are the photos!

P. lutea in situ at the S. rubra wherryi roadside site in Washington Co, AL. Notice how just like the rubra wherryi's, the pings also survived being run over by a tractor...they're tough little gems:

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Closer shot of a single plant from the same site: medium was this really fine, silty clay with a pinch of well decomposed organic, peaty material mixed in:

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I think this is another roadside population in washington Co, AL:

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They loved to inhabit the open areas, and seemed to thrive in full sun:

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Brown chicken, brown cow!!! Yes, these are that hot (to me at least):

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These were huge P. lutea plants-just beautiful:

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I wasn't meant to be a photographer:

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Here's some growing at a site in okaloosa Co, FL:

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Drosera capillaris (?) is a common companion plant:

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Butterworts were worse to find than S. psittacina-this is what you're typically up against...can you find the P. lutea in this picture?

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Some of the P. luteas were pretty big:

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P. primuliflora was growing in the very wet, boggy areas. Okaloosa Co, FL:

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A closer shot-I'm double guessing myself, but I'm sorta sure these are primulifloras:

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One last shot:

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Wow!!! Stunning images, thanks for sharing it with us.

Best regards,

Rodrigo

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Roadsides can be very good habitats for all kinds of wildflowers including those CP, s. But I have noticed that they mowe them to frequently. Well Droseras and Pinguicula can tolerate that well as they are low growing plants. But Sarracenias with taller pitchers get no chance to grow well there then as their pitchers get mowed off all the time. Maybe the US government should considering mowing those roadsides only in the autum season after the Sarracenias seeds have ripened,then they can colonize those roadside habitats. Well it will be also better for other wildlive like butterflies and birds.

And less mowing of roadsides would save the US government probably millions of dollars.

Here in The Netherlands they mowe less frequently, only ones or twice a year. It results in many wildflowers! Hopefully the US will do the same!

Alexander

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Hi,

Maybe the US government should considering mowing those roadsides only in the autum season after the Sarracenias seeds have ripened,then they can colonize those roadside habitats. Well it will be also better for other wildlive like butterflies and birds.

from what i heard, they will rather go for herbicides instead of mowing. I heard from several people speaking about several sites (mostly just under a powerline), that they turned to spraying herbicides instead of mowing, as this is easier and likely cheaper. That's for sure the end of every plant, that's growing there.

Christian

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