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my ping rock---


amphirion
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because some of us aren't cool enough to have our own ping wall. :laugh2:... _sad__by_cookiemagik-d2zpwkb.gif

P. agnata 'blue flower' in the foreground; P. 'sethos', P. cyclosecta, P. esseriana, and P. jaumavensis in the background. I swear.

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_MG_6964 by mr.phamtastic, on Flickr

Aside from the previously mentioned, there's P. rotundiflora in the foreground and P. collimensis in the background.

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_MG_6963 by mr.phamtastic, on Flickr

Another shot.

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_MG_6962 by mr.phamtastic, on Flickr

P. cyclosecta's naughty bits.

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pinguicula cyclosecta flower by mr.phamtastic, on Flickr

P. cyclosecta

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_MG_6952 by mr.phamtastic, on Flickr

thanks for stopping by!

Edited by amphirion
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Thaks very much! To answer both of your questions, the rock is "grown" using the tray system. Peat, perlite and sand are used to fill in pockets of the lace rock and I plant the pings in those pockets. I only fill the water up to slightly below the lowest ping. The water travels to the plants via capilary action well enough, but using LFS as wicks to feed the media pockets water can also work. My rock is still relatively young--it will be much more easier to maintain once when moss grows which will give the pings something more substantial to attach themselves on.

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Pinguicula walls don't have to be built like they have been... All that Sphagnum doesn't seem very ping friendly to me anyway.

A nylon water wicking system mixed with sand and gravel might work just as well as Sphagnum moss and vermiculite, but the nylon should last for many more years and not degrade as the sphagnum will.

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Amphirion, his collection of Pinguicula is fantastic, congratulations and success in the hobby.

Pinguicula walls don't have to be built like they have been... All that Sphagnum doesn't seem very ping friendly to me anyway.

Dave Evans, most of my Pinguicula are substrate prepared Sphagnum + sand, and apparently go well. Recently i am doing an experiment growing in a mineral substrate with a clone of P. 'Aphrodite', i created a sheet from the mother plant, and noticed that the plant takes longer to develop. I'm following the growth of it and depending on the situation, i will migrate my entire crop for this type of substrate.

Best regards,

Rodrigo

Edited by Rodrigo
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