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Simon Lumb

sarras and tap water

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with no sign of the hot weather letting up and therefore no rain around the corner anybody any idea how long sarras will survive in tap water before adverse effects are seen?

S

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People have grown them for many years with no effect in tap water . It's down to your local water supply . The only answer to this question is try it out sometime on a spare plant sometime .

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unless you can test the TDS of your tap water and it's within safe levels then I'd just bite the bullet and buy some distilled. personally I wouldn't fancy the riskof using tap water unless I knew it was safe.

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Simon,mine is fine for sarra's.Bring a bucket next time your up.

ada

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Adrian you can't beat Yorkshire water unfortunately Thames water is not as CP friendly. Every year I swear I won't go short again and despite increasing the number of water butts I always run out. Without wanting to sound like Mike (sorry Mike) I've gone through 2000L of stored rainwater. Scorchio today ..again and when i got home half my neps were as flaccid my todger after seven pints of Stella.

Gotcher no stream only the Thames nearby and carrying is not an option.

I think I will just end up repotting everything into fresh media at the end of the year.

Edited by Simon Lumb
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Si

I'm in the same boat as yourself. On my last drop of water:(

Why don't you invest in buying a RO FIlter your worries would be over about using tap water.

It's one of the best things I've ever got. :)

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In the future if you sink your pots in deep sand and water at one given point you would use less water . Be aware of the weight this does work on any plants I have used this method in the past and is very good if going away .

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I use RO water when my rainwater runs out. I have been using ro water for the last few weeks now, and I have to say the plants really do look very healthy on it. Thinking of getting an ro kit but have absolutely no idea how they work or how to instyall one etc etc, so I guess I'll just continue buying it from the local aquatic centre.

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I've just bought a RO filter and it really is simple to set up, though it helps enormously if you have an outside tap you can attach a hosepipe to.

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Every so often (...usually when we have a week or two of SUN !!) a thread or two comes up about the lack of water.

A few years ago, just like Flyter above (...and those others posting in the 'lack of water' threads) i bought a RO unit due to seriously runnning short of H2O - sounding familiar to anyone at the moment. ?

....and since then I've never looked back !!!!!! Just a bit of common sense needed to work out when you're going to run dry....so you can start SLOWLY 'creating' RO water before that happens.

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I've been watering my CPs with tap water for years with success, including Sarras, tropical Drosera, Dionaea and even Heliamphora. I did add few drops of citrus acid from time to time to the water in case of pH rise. Can't say my local water was crystal clear, I guess it's just that plants aren't as fragile as it's claimed.

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Exactly. My tap water is crystal clear but because the CaCO3 content is off the scale (pun intended) it's deadly. I've noticed the way people who proclaim to use tap water for years and notice no ill effects appear to be living in soft water areas on the kind of geology that supports native populations; So obviously! Now I'm not naive and suggesting that's all there is to it (dissolved K+ was mentioned and then there's the chlorides and flourides) but it's not as if any nitrogenous stuff is added to our water supplies (that's what the purification mostly removes).

Everybody bragging about the virtues of their own tap water isn't helping send out the right message to inexperienced growers.

Tap water should only be considered okay to use in exceptional circumstances and when certain of it's chemistry (don't trust what the water board tell you, test for yourself).

By the way regarding the original question I would go with gotcher's response that really you would have to do the test yourself for your supply.

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One thing that may help is to fill the water butts with tap water, allow it to stand at least overnight (gets rid of the excess chlorine), and to hang a bag (stocking or pantihose is ideal) of peat in the butt overnight - this will help to absorb some of the hardness and an acidify the water somewhat - when done use the peat on the garden.

chris

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Chris, I doubt that will make a difference to a butt full of hard water. I think that Adrian Slack used to acidify water with acid to reduce it to a specific pH.

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Hi Stephen,

I agree that it will not acidify the water much, but the tannin will combine with some of the calcium and precipitate out. Adrian used sulphuric acid, I have used phosporic acid in the past - neither should be used by anyone not trained to deal with these acids as they are highly corrosive.

chris

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